Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

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12:48pm

Wed July 17, 2013
Colorado River

U.S. Senators Focus on Colorado River Challenges

Predicted imbalances in the Colorado River was up for discussion at a Senate hearing in Washington D.C. yesterday. The River provides water to nearly 40 million people.
Credit Marci Krivonen

The Colorado River and its future imbalances were the focus of a Senate hearing in Washington D.C. Tuesday. The river supplies water for cities and farms in seven states and parts of Mexico. Lawmakers went over a 2012 study that projects water demand will outpace supply in the coming decades. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

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2:45pm

Mon July 15, 2013
Environment

Tribes in Western U.S. Use Water to Assert Sovereignty

The Kerr Dam in Northwest Montana was built in the 1930's on the Flathead Indian Reservation. It's been owned by non-tribal companies since it was built.
Credit Marci Krivonen

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes in Montana stand to become the first tribes in the country to own a major hydroelectric dam. In Colorado, tribes are managing parts of hydro projects. All are examples of tribes regaining control of resources on their land. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

In Colorado’s southwest, the Ute Mountain Ute tribe co-manages part of the Dolores Water Project. And, near Durango, the Animas/La Plata project is partially managed by the state’s two tribes. Ernest House directs the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs.

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12:10pm

Fri July 12, 2013
Bike and Build

Cross-Country Cyclists Build Homes for the Needy in Colorado

Cindy Freimark and Rachel Scheinman are part of the group Bike and Build. On Friday, they're helping construct a home in Silt.
Credit Marci Krivonen

A group of cross-country cyclists is making a stop in Silt Friday to help build a house. The group will work with the local chapter of Habitat for Humanity to construct a home for a family in need.

The cycling group, called Bike and Build, sends groups of young people on long tours through different parts of the country, where they hammer nails for affordable housing projects.

24-year-old Cindy Freimark is with the group building homes in Colorado this summer. She says she’s been touched by the stories she hears.

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5:00pm

Thu July 11, 2013
Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition - July 11th, 2013

If you get a DUI, your blood sample isn’t going to the state lab any more... that’s because the Colorado health department wasn’t handling them properly. We’ll get an update on what that means for drug and alcohol cases.

Indian Tribes across the west are strengthening their sovereignty by getting involved in natural resource development on or near reservations. The tribes in Colorado are involved in two hydro projects.

And fires may be burning differently-- because of changing weather, trees, and other factors. That means changes are in store for how firefighters take on wildfires.

Carbondale writer Jon Waterman has a new book out--after detailing the winding journey of the Colorado River, he’s put together what he calls a handbook for a life intertwined with the outdoors.

And, We’ll get a preview of three exhibitions opening in Basalt this weekend... they’re all by women artists.


10:16am

Wed July 10, 2013
Guns

Updated: Sheriffs' Lawsuit to Overturn Colorado's New Gun Laws heads to Court

Larry Emery manages Basalt Firearms in downtown Basalt. He's seeing impacts from the state's new gun laws.
Credit Marci Krivonen

The lawsuit 55 Colorado sheriffs filed to overturn two new gun laws goes in front of a judge today. The laws went into effect July first. Now, an attorney representing the sheriffs will ask that parts of the law that limits gun magazines be put on hold. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The sheriffs and other plaintiffs in the case, including one retired police officer, want the new laws completely struck from the books. One law limits gun magazines to 15 rounds. The other mandates background checks for all gun transfers.

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