Marci Krivonen


Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways to Connect

Creative Commons/Flickr/Marcie Casas

One question on the fall ballot asks Pitkin County voters to opt out of a state law, so better broadband service can be explored. Right now, many rural enclaves have poor service or no internet connection at all. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

City of Aspen

A pedestrian bridge over Castle Creek Road near Aspen was damaged this summer. Now it’s getting fixed, which means the road will be closed to traffic later this month. 

On June 18th an oversized construction vehicle clipped the the bridge on its way up Castle Creek Road. The wooden bridge connects two open spaces. The truck ripped off part of the support structure on the bridge’s underside. Matt Kuhn is the City of Aspen Trails Manager.

Marci Krivonen

High school students from around the valley got a lesson on drought and water scarcity in the West Thursday. The organization Ecoflight brought in experts, and college students just returned from a flight over the Colorado River basin. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

A developer behind a campaign in Aspen is infusing tens of thousands of dollars into an effort to build a hotel.

Base2 lodge is at the center of a ballot question. It was the theme of an Aspen Public Radio town hall meeting this week.

Voters in Snowmass Village recall a councilman who went to jail for drunk driving.

The fire departments in Carbondale and Basalt are asking voters for money in the fall election.

Construction on a new school in Carbondale is nearing completion.

Marci Krivonen

Pitkin County staff are taking first steps to up-root and move ahead of a major construction project.

Marci Krivonen

Supporters and opponents of a hotel development in Aspen, debated density, parking and employee housing Tuesday. 

Marci Krivonen

Officials with the White River National Forest told elected leaders in Pitkin County Tuesday (10/13) a government shutdown is a “very real possibility.” 

If a government shutdown comes as a result of disagreement over a budget in Washington, the public likely won’t notice. Forest Service staff would be laid off in December, when fewer jobs are filled. And, even though some ski resorts operate on Forest Service land, White River District Ranger Karen Schroyer says skiers and riders won’t be affected.

An Aspen Skiing Company executive has been chosen to help build a new statewide effort around Colorado’s multi-billion dollar outdoor recreation industry. Auden Schendler was named to an advisory committee for the Colorado Outdoor Recreation Industry Office. Schendler is the SkiCo’s Vice President of Sustainability.

Auden Schendler is the Aspen Skiing Company’s Vice President of Sustainability. Last week he was named to an advisory group for the new state office. 


Pitkin County will present several preliminary designs for a new airport terminal next week, on Oct. 22nd.

The concept drawings range from a single-story building to a two-story configuration. The designs incorporate community input given at community meetings last spring. Airport Director John Kinney said in a statement community comments led to designs where views are maximized, the size is appropriate and interior is intimate with a “small town feel.”

Aspen Global Change Institute


An expert in urbanization and land use change is speaking in Aspen Tuesday. She has advice for land use planners in Aspen.


Karen Seto is a professor at Yale. She studies why cities are growing, how they grow and how their growth impacts the environment. People are moving to cities at a more rapid pace than ever before. And, urban areas generate three-quarters of global greenhouse gas emissions. She says urbanization increases demand for resources.