Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways to Connect

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In a matter of a month, the issue committee backing Base 2 lodge on the fall ballot has spent nearly $30,000. Election groups filed their final campaign finance reports with the City of Aspen on Tuesday (10/27). 

Citizens for Aspen Alive is working to get people to vote yes on Question 2A. It would allow developer Mark Hunt’s Base 2 lodge to be built on the corner of Monarch and Main streets. Hunt’s the lone contributor to the issue committee, spending $50,000 of his own money on things like mailers, newspaper advertising, t-shirts, pizza and beer.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BeHeardTVlive

A Carbondale nonprofit is getting involved in this week’s Republican presidential debate in Boulder. The True Media Foundation will aim to give youth a voice during tomorrow’s event. 

The Foundation teaches local students to produce media with positive social impact. One of its programs - Be Heard! - is spearheading the GOP effort. It’s sending two mobile production vehicles and a crew to the CU Boulder campus - the site of the debate.

Marci Krivonen

There’s growing momentum around producing local food in the Roaring Fork Valley. The new group Roaring Fork Beginning Farmers and Ranchers sprung up earlier this year. It targets mostly young people and it’s meant to help new farmers with hurdles like expensive land. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

Creative Commons/Flickr/David Leo Veksler

By the year 2040, nearly 8 million people will call Colorado home. A new set of data shows the state’s population will grow by 40 percent. 

Rocky Mountain PBS and I-News examined numbers from the Census Bureau and state demographer. They released the data last week.

It shows Garfield County’s population will surpass 100,000 people sometime between 2035 and 2040. The latest population count shows 57,302 people live in the county. Most of the Western Slope, led by Garfield County, will experience strong growth between now and 2040.

Sandra Peirce

Five people are vying for two open seats on the Aspen School District’s Board of Education. Issues being discussed this campaign season include district funding, teacher housing and school culture. All of the candidates support ballot question 3A, which seeks school funding through property taxes.

Mary Houchin

Five people are vying for two open seats on the Aspen School District’s Board of Education. Issues being discussed this campaign season include district funding, teacher housing and school culture. All of the candidates support ballot question 3A, which seeks school funding through property taxes.

Marci Krivonen

Five people are vying for two open seats on the Aspen School District’s Board of Education. Issues being discussed this campaign season include district funding, teacher housing and school culture. All of the candidates support ballot question 3A, which seeks school funding through property taxes.

Marci Krivonen

Five people are vying for two open seats on the Aspen School District’s Board of Education. Issues being discussed this campaign season include district funding and school culture. All of the candidates support ballot question 3A, which seeks school funding through property taxes.

Pitkin County

The budget for Pitkin County is getting reviewed ahead of a December deadline for adoption. The $104 million budget reflects upgrades to government buildings.

Each fall the county commissioners review every dollar the local government plans to spend in the coming year. In 2016, ongoing expenses like salaries, health services and public safety are rising by 1.7 percent. But, the overall budget will increase by 8.9 percent. That includes expected costs for a major construction project. Jon Peacock is county manager.

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