Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

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The Forest Supervisor for the White River National Forest says he expects to see more marijuana grow sites on national forest land now that pot is legal in Colorado.

Forest Service officials on Wednesday dismantled a large cultivation site near Ruedi Reservoir. It’s illegal to grow marijuana on federal land and there are strict penalties.

Hunters discovered the latest site that contained more than 2600 mature marijuana plants. That’s $6 million to $8 million worth of pot. Scott Fitzwilliams is Forest Supervisor.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

The White River National Forest wipes out a multi-million dollar marijuana grow site near Ruedi Reservoir.

The City of Aspen and a condo developer are battling it out in court this week, arguing about access to a downtown building.

And dark money is flowing into a state senate race in our region.

Republicans are going after the millennial vote in the hotly contested US Senate Race... that pits Mark Udall against Cory Gardner.

CAIC

Wednesday’s big snowflakes were the first major sign of winter in Colorado’s high country and one organization is already warning powder hungry skiers to be wary of avalanches in the backcountry. 

The Colorado Avalanche Information Center put out a statement on Wednesday warning of avalanches in October. Avalanche Forecaster Scott Toepfer says it’s not uncommon to see slides this early in the season and usually skiers are unprepared.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Vox Efx

In November the Republican party in Colorado is aiming for control of the State Senate and one key race is in the 5th Senate District. It includes Pitkin and Eagle Counties. The seat is up for grabs because Senator Gail Schwartz of Snowmass Village is term-limited. Three candidates, each new to state politics, are urging voters to turn out to the polls and, so-called “dark money” is flowing into the race. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Marci Krivonen

Next week a new creative space will open in an old library in Carbondale. Two non profits are retrofitting the former Gordon Cooper Library and renaming it The Launchpad. They say the center, which will offer art and dancing, adds something that’s missing in Carbondale’s rich arts scene. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Deborah Colley gingerly steps over construction materials at the old Gordon Cooper Library.

"Our offices will be over here on the closed-off, glassed-in north side of the building," she says.

Marci Krivonen

The U.S. Forest Service is proposing media outlets ask permission before filming or photographing in Wilderness areas. But local forest service officials say little will change on the White River National Forest. 

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

The Roaring Fork Valley is awash with fall colors this week.

Basalt puts together a commission to decide on a way to revitalize old town.

Health insurance rates are going down next year for some residents in the Glenwood Springs area. And that’s partly because some doctors and hospitals have agreed to get paid less.

U.S. Senate candidates in Colorado battle it out for the women’s vote in the November election.

And we look at the 35th annual Aspen Film Fest, opening this weekend.

www.ourtownplanning.org

Tonight (Tues 9/23) the Basalt Town Council will decide whether to approve members of a special board that will help make decisions on downtown development. The committee would, according to the Town Manager, “put more meat” on redevelopment ideas. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Ahead of the mid-term election in November, polls differ on who’s ahead in Colorado’s most contested races.

The Colorado Department of Transportation is asking local governments to help pay for Glenwood’s Grand Avenue bridge. Garfield County has agreed to contribute millions.

Colorado Mountain College administrators are turning their focus to what kids are learning before they walk in the door.

And, a new preschool program serving low-income kids is using lessons about the brain to encourage learning.

Bureau of Land Management

The Colorado branch of the federal Bureau of Land Management is welcoming a new district manager. Joe Meyer will be in charge of the Northwest corner of the state, including the field office closest to the Roaring Fork Valley, in Silt. The long-time Wyoming Field Manager will begin his new job in Colorado next week. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen spoke with him from his office in Casper.

Joe Meyer is the BLM’s new Northwest Colorado District Manager. His home base will be in Grand Junction.

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