Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

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Colorado writer Mark Stevens has written three murder mystery novels that are set in the Flattops Wilderness near Glenwood Springs. His latest book, Trapline, was released in November. He was signing books at Explore Booksellers in Aspen on Saturday. Stevens, who lives in Denver, explained to Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen why he chose the Flattops as the backdrop for his books.

Mark Stevens is the author of Trapline, a murder mystery novel set in the Flattops Wilderness near Glenwood Springs. Stevens’ fourth book comes out in September.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

Once again, Aspen will play host to the First Lady. Michelle Obama is expected to be in town this weekend.

An Aspen teenager arrested and taken down by police officers gets an attorney. Police suspect the teen had marijuana.

Aspen City Council supports an affordable housing project from a prolific landowner. But, a tree nearly derails the approval.

The new Airport Director in Aspen talks about plans to improve the experience of flying into the Upper Valley.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Wonderlane

If you’re an adult with Medicaid in the Roaring Fork Valley, there’s only one clinic that will accept your health insurance. This lack of access is a problem as the number of Medicaid patients increase under the Affordable Care Act. Colorado expanded Medicaid a year ago and in Pitkin County alone, the number of people using Medicaid nearly tripled. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

High Country News

The changes the White River National Forest is considering to minimize crowds in wilderness areas have been successful in other forests. Last week, Forest Service officials began an informal outreach effort around how to bring back solitude to busy trails and backcountry camping. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, their ideas have been tried in other wilderness areas.

Aspen Sopris District Ranger Karen Schroyer is delivering a presentation to a packed house in Aspen. She’s working to educate people about problems in the forest and solicit feedback.

West Slope Back On Drought Index

In the dry month of January, snowpack levels in nearly every river basin in Colorado declined. In the Roaring Fork Valley, not only did the amount of snow diminish but drought conditions returned. 

The U.S. Drought Monitor released Thursday puts the Western Slope in the “abnormally dry” category, including the majority of Eagle and Pitkin Counties and all of Garfield County. “Abnormally dry” is the least severe of five categories.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

With a measles outbreak in several states, more parents in Pitkin County are getting their kids vaccinated.

The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority will consider making it easier to comment on a controversial access plan.

The starting bell rings for candidates and ballot measures in Aspen’s May Election.

Snowmass Village starts reviewing proposed changes for Base Village.

We tally up just how recreational pot shops are in the Roaring Fork Valley after a year of legal retail marijuana.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Philippa Willitts

An Aspen charity focused on reducing the number of suicides in our region is expanding its reach. The Aspen Hope Center is holding a support group for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and questioning teenagers. According to its organizers, the group, called I am Me is the first of its kind in the Valley. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Hope Center Executive Director Michelle Muething realized LGBTQ teenagers needed support after several came to the organization for help.

The Aspen Music Festival and School has announced its 2015 summer season. The organization’s 300 events will center around the theme “Dreams of Travel.” The Music Festival holds classical music performances for eight weeks and instructs students from around the world. This year, the organization attracted more student applications than ever before. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Festival CEO Alan Fletcher.

Here's a list of offerings from the Aspen Music Festival and School this summer:

For one year now, Colorado has allowed recreational marijuana stores to operate. In the Roaring Fork Valley, fourteen recreational pot shops are operating. Aspen Public Radio is examining the legal marijuana business from one end of the Valley to the other and, how momentum has shifted from the mid Valley to  Aspen. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher and Marci Krivonen report.

Longtime Carbondale resident Tom Bleskan is standing outside of what could be his new line of work. He’s next to a small warehouse.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

Warm temperatures are boosting river levels and disappointing skiers. We’ll tell you what’s ahead in the forecast.

Low oil and gas prices are good for consumers but tough on companies drilling in Western Colorado.

Despite an oil and gas slowdown, a new analysis shows hundreds of spills are still being reported.

Aspen residents are gathering signatures to get a measure on the ballot that would require voter-approval of some development projects.

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