Marci Krivonen


Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

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Marci Krivonen

The USA Pro Cycling Challenge brings to Aspen not just professional cyclists, but visitors, vendors and infrastructure. To put on the event that spans two days, the City of Aspen relies heavily on volunteers. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Volunteers trickle into headquarters in downtown Aspen early Wednesday. At the registration table, they grab lanyards and get directions.

"It’s slow and steady right now, but everyone’s excited and it’s good," says Beth Hansen.

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School starts next week for students across the valley. The Roaring Fork School District operates schools in Basalt, Carbondale and Glenwood Springs. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke to superintendent Diana Sirko about how this year will be different than past years.

Diana Sirko is superintendent of schools for the Roaring Fork School District. This fall, the district may go to the voters for help in funding new school buildings and teacher housing. The school board will make a decision next week on whether to hold an election.


The Pitkin County Commissioners are unhappy with what they’ve seen so far in a BLM plan for existing oil and gas leases on the Thompson Divide. They’re crafting a letter to the agency. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Pitkin County gets an early look at the BLM’s preliminary draft Environmental Impact Statement because it’s a cooperating agency. A public version will be released in November. It’ll decide what to do with more than two dozen undeveloped oil and gas leases in the Thompson Divide, southwest of Carbondale. Pitkin County wants the leases canceled.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Frank Denis Chalk it up

Snowmass Village residents are generally happy with their quality of life and feel safe in town, according to results from a community survey.

This is the third time Snowmass has conducted such a survey. It’s like a report card for Town government, giving full and part time residents as well as visitors a chance to rate services, like transit and public safety.

Travis Elliot is with the Town of Snowmass. He helped get the word out about the survey.

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The demand is high for local food in the Roaring Fork Valley, but there’s not enough available. Results from a six-month study show a need to increase local food production through supporting new and beginning farmers. Gwen Garcelon heads the Roaring Fork Food Policy Council, which initiated the analysis. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Gwen Garcelon is with the Roaring Fork Food Policy Council. 

Facebook/USA Pro Challenge

The biggest impact to local traffic this week from the USA Pro Challenge will be on Independence Pass.

The professional cyclists will arrive in Aspen Wednesday (8/19) via Independence Pass. They’ll leave town the next day, on Thursday (8/20), headed to Breckenridge in stage four of the race.

This is the fifth year the riders will move through Aspen. The race always brings traffic disruptions.

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On Thursday, City of Aspen and Pitkin County staff took water and sediment samples at Grizzly Reservoir following discoloration of the Roaring Fork River. The work follows concerns from elected leaders.

The crystal clear water turned brown early this week after a dam problem forced the release of muddy water from Grizzly Reservoir. Between 10 and 20 acre feet flowed from Lincoln Creek into the Roaring Fork River.

  Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition. I’m Elise Thatcher.

And, I’m Marci Krivonen. Governor Hickenlooper visits Aspen and talks about climate change.

A man arrested for stealing pot from an Aspen dispensary gets transferred to a local jail.

General Wesley Clark was in Aspen for AREDay. He discussed renewable energy, national security and climate change.

A new Colorado law around DUIs might make life a little safer in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Marci Krivonen

Construction is more than halfway done on what’s expected to be one of the most energy efficient buildings in the world. Rocky Mountain Institute’s Innovation Center in Basalt will house offices and a large conference and community room.

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Pitkin County is looking to share 911 dispatchers with the Town of Vail to deal with a shortage of workers. 

Pitkin County Undersheriff Ron Ryan told county commissioners Wednesday the dispatch center is in “crisis mode.” 911 call centers typically experience difficulty in hiring, but for Aspen it’s especially tough because of its small staff. Just eight people are fully trained. That's about half of a full staff.