Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Ahead of the mid-term election in November, polls differ on who’s ahead in Colorado’s most contested races.

The Colorado Department of Transportation is asking local governments to help pay for Glenwood’s Grand Avenue bridge. Garfield County has agreed to contribute millions.

Colorado Mountain College administrators are turning their focus to what kids are learning before they walk in the door.

And, a new preschool program serving low-income kids is using lessons about the brain to encourage learning.

Bureau of Land Management

The Colorado branch of the federal Bureau of Land Management is welcoming a new district manager. Joe Meyer will be in charge of the Northwest corner of the state, including the field office closest to the Roaring Fork Valley, in Silt. The long-time Wyoming Field Manager will begin his new job in Colorado next week. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen spoke with him from his office in Casper.

Joe Meyer is the BLM’s new Northwest Colorado District Manager. His home base will be in Grand Junction.

Marci Krivonen

ESPN is asking Pitkin County to consider allowing alcohol and fireworks at the upcoming X Games. An official from the network went before county commissioners on Tuesday with the requests. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains.

ESPN officials say they want to enhance the X Games experience at the base of Buttermilk. That’s the site where athletes test their skills on the superpipe and throw tricks on jumps and rails.

Kate Lapides

A growing education program in the Valley is teaching preschoolers how their brain works so they can focus on learning. The “Focused Kids” program is being taught to low income, mostly Latino kids, in a unique preschool. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, this new program is happening inside a school bus.

Inside El Busesito, a small group of students and teachers are playing games on the carpeted floor. It’s a comfortable space that doesn’t look at all like a bus. The seats have been removed to make way for books and toys.

Marci Krivonen

As the entire Roaring Fork Valley takes a huge breath after a busy summer, we’re exploring why Colorado’s mountain resorts get so congested. It’s thanks in part, to an aggressive marketing effort that’s been growing since the 1940s. In his book “Vacationland: Tourism and Environment in the Colorado High Country,” University of Denver History Professor William Philpott says the effort to repackage Colorado as a tourist destination followed World War II. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with him.

Marci Krivonen

Firefighters in Aspen today marked the 13th anniversary of 9-11 with a somber ceremony. The event not only recognized the World Trade Center attacks, but also touched on President Obama’s recent efforts to root out Islamic State extremists. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The mood was reflective and somber as local firefighters lined up outside the Aspen firehouse just after noon. A large American Flag waved high overhead as a group of more than 100 people gathered. A bell rang to remember the 343 firefighters who lost their lives at the World Trade Center.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

So far it looks like the Roaring Fork Valley is holding off a nasty virus that’s raising concerns in Denver. 

Bears are causing some problems, we hear what police in Basalt are doing about it.

One of the visible leftover structures from the recession in the Upper Valley may disappear later this year.

And more people are showing interest in farming Pitkin county open space land.

Climate change reports are frequent-- we check on one about water in the Valley.

We’ll get the details on how Aspen’s airport could get quieter and say “goodbye” to long time airport director Jim Elwood.

responsehelps.org

The problem of domestic violence is being talked about nationally after footage of abuse by an NFL player went public earlier this week. And,  the National Domestic Violence Hotline reportedly has seen a spike in calls.

Marci Krivonen

A multi-story building in Aspen that’s been unfinished since the recession could see construction work this Fall. Developers of the Dancing Bear’s “Mountainside” building want to open the luxury residence club by the end of 2015. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Randall Bone is CEO of Sunrise Company, the development group behind the two Dancing Bear buildings. Today he’s taking a small group on a tour of the “Parkside” residence club in downtown Aspen.

Marci Krivonen

Interest is growing in farming Pitkin County’s agricultural lands. The county manages about 250 acres that are either already leased or will become available to agricultural producers later this year. The land is desirable because it’s cheap. Often the cost of farming and ranching in Pitkin County keeps would-be agricultural producers from jumping into the industry. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

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