Rob St. Mary

Digital Content Manager/All Things Considered Host

Born and raised in the northeast suburbs of Detroit, Rob has been a media freak since he was a toddler. His first movie experience was at age two. By age 17 he had co-created an underground student newspaper and started acting classes.  In 1997, at the age of 19, Rob produced a low-budget 16mm vampire/comedy called “Tainted”. In 1999, “Tainted” played in the market section at the Cannes Film Festival. In 2002, Rob undertook his first feature length documentary – “The Separation on State Street” which followed a church/state separation case in Michigan's thumb. Rob's film work has screened in festivals internationally and garnered awards.

Since 2001, Rob has worked in radio news. He started at WJR (Detroit) followed by WLEW (Bad Axe), WSGW (Saginaw), WOOD (Grand Rapids) and WDET (Detroit). Rob has been honored over two-dozen times for his feature and investigative work by statewide and national journalism organizations.

Beyond his work as digital content manager for Aspen Public Radio, Rob is also working on a book for Wayne State University Press entitled “Re-Entry: The Orbit Magazine Anthology” on the history several alt-weekly Detroit publications from the late 1970s to 1999. Rob is also co-host of a weekly film podcast, "The Projection Booth" which is available on-line and through iTunes.

In his off hours, Rob enjoys movies, books, playing guitar & bass, hanging out with his cats and enjoying the new environment of the Roaring Fork Valley.

You can follow him on twitter : @RobDET

Ways To Connect

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week Aspen Public Radio News Director Carolyn Sackariason hosts the show.

There’s a dust up down valley between the bus service and local officials over the Rio Grande Trail.

An elementary school in Carbondale is looking for a new principal after she put in her resignation half-way through the year.

Should Aspen votes be asked to approve every piece of development in the city?

Meanwhile, Mark Hunt goes directly to Aspen citizens about his development plans.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

The lodging review continues in Aspen and for the city council, this week, it was a mixed bag.

Meanwhile, the city employees reviewing those plans are looking for a new home of their own.

A proposed pot growing operation faces the NIMBY wrath in Silt.

Do we love the Maroon Bells too much and is that a problem?

Should Garfield County voters have the chance to vote for commissioners by district instead of at large?

Aspen and Glenwood Springs are going all mail balloting this spring

And what’s the lowdown on uphilling? That’s a conference coming on that topic.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week it was announced that Aspen’s book store could have a new owner – a collection of non-profit social advocates.

To add more rentals or not to add more rentals, that is the question when it comes to affordable housing the in the area.

“Citizens to Save Grand Avenue” are challenging the bridge project. But, could it end up in the lawsuit?

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

The upper Roaring Fork Valley saw a dramatic rescue this week, after three elk fell into an icy pond.

A local ski guide gets caught in an avalanche; it’s a reminder that avalanche season is in full-swing.

A new climate report shows Aspen has seen temperatures warm over the last several decades.

Much larger fines are looming for oil and gas companies who don’t follow the law.

And, Basalt inches closer to deciding how to redevelop parts of downtown.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

Finding an affordable place to live is not just an Aspen thing. The Roaring Fork School District and Carbondale are working together on something similar for teachers.

Colorado’s U.S. Senator Michael Bennet plans to reintroduce a bill to keep future drilling out of the Thompson Divide. But, does it have a chance in the Republican controlled Congress in Washington?

Aspen Valley Hospital and its Non Profit partner have worked out their differences. But, is that the end?

Welcome to Valley Roundup – a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week, development can often seem like three-dimensional chess – we’ll get the latest on Mark Hunt’s lodging plans for Aspen.

A wider runway is on the horizon for the Aspen Pitkin County Airport. But, if citizens need to vote on it would it get approved?

Rifle remembers the life of Air Force Captain William DuBois as he is laid to rest.

Glenwood Springs will get a review of air quality near downtown.

Could an antique chair lift derail Aspen Mountain’s world cup racing plans?

How many weed shops are too many… one… six… sixteen?

And, I’ll have a conversation with a familiar name in the valley, and voice you hear often on this program, who is taking a leadership role in the Aspen Public Radio news room.

Joining me this week are Curtis Wackerle, Managing Editor of the Aspen Daily News and Randy Essex, Editor of the Glenwood Post Independent.

ACS Gets High Marks in State Rankings

The Aspen Community School is one of the top-ranked schools in the state according to a new analysis. The school near Woody Creek ranked 6th out of 500 middle schools. The organization Colorado School Grades releases its report card annually on nearly 2,000 public schools. The group uses data from the Colorado Department of Education and a formula developed at the University of Colorado Denver to come up with its rankings. The formula looks at a school’s academic achievement, academic growth and gaps in education. In 2014, the Aspen Community charter School received an “A-plus” for grades six through eight. Other schools in the Roaring Fork Valley received grades. The Aspen High School scored a “B-plus” and Roaring Fork High School in Carbondale received a “C,” as did Glenwood Springs High School. Bridges High School in Carbondale was one of the lowest scoring high schools in the state. A link for the full list can be found here.

NOTE: Kent Haruf passed away in December 2014.  This interview was recorded in May 2013. 

Kent Haruf’s honors include a Whiting Foundation Award, a Stegner Award, a Frank Waters Award, and a special citation from the PEN/Hemingway Foundation. His novel Plainsong won the Mountains & Plains Booksellers Award and was a finalist for the National Book Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and the New Yorker Book Award. He lives with his wife, Cathy, in his native Colorado.  His most recent novel is Benediction.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week the White River National Forest released an oil and gas plan. But, does that settle the matter on drilling in the Thompson Divide?

The City of Aspen continues to refine a new lodging incentives ordinance. At the same time, the council is asking the city management to give them better information.

The State of Colorado is not messing around when it comes to regulations and medical pot shops.

Could Aspen’s Little Annie’s return from the grave… again?

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a look at the week’s news with various writers and editors in the valley.

This week the Aspen City Council decided on a new plan to increase the number of lodging beds in town. But, is anyone happy with the plan?

It looks like the economy has recovered as there is very little vacancy in the commercial core of Aspen.

Does Pitkin County need bigger bike lanes? We might just get them.

A local service man, Captain William H. DuBois is being remembered.

Glenwood Springs wants to get tough on unlocked trash.

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