Rob St. Mary

Digital Content Manager/All Things Considered Host

Born and raised in the northeast suburbs of Detroit, Rob has been a media freak since he was a toddler. His first movie experience was at age two. By age 17 he had co-created an underground student newspaper and started acting classes.  In 1997, at the age of 19, Rob produced a low-budget 16mm vampire/comedy called “Tainted”. In 1999, “Tainted” played in the market section at the Cannes Film Festival. In 2002, Rob undertook his first feature length documentary – “The Separation on State Street” which followed a church/state separation case in Michigan's thumb. Rob's film work has screened in festivals internationally and garnered awards.

Since 2001, Rob has worked in radio news. He started at WJR (Detroit) followed by WLEW (Bad Axe), WSGW (Saginaw), WOOD (Grand Rapids) and WDET (Detroit). Rob has been honored over two-dozen times for his feature and investigative work by statewide and national journalism organizations.

Beyond his work as digital content manager for Aspen Public Radio, Rob is also working on a book for Wayne State University Press entitled “Re-Entry: The Orbit Magazine Anthology” on the history several alt-weekly Detroit publications from the late 1970s to 1999. Rob is also co-host of a weekly film podcast, "The Projection Booth" which is available on-line and through iTunes.

In his off hours, Rob enjoys movies, books, playing guitar & bass, hanging out with his cats and enjoying the new environment of the Roaring Fork Valley.

You can follow him on twitter : @RobDET

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2014 Aspen Ideas Fesitval
12:01 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Communities That Thrive

Communities That Thrive

Healthy communities put people first, with safe housing, convenient schools and workplaces, and ready access to food, water, recreation and sustainable transportation. Rural or urban, resource-rich or impoverished, they offer opportunity and hope, and reward imagination and ingenuity. These places also foster a sense of shared purpose, perhaps sporting community centers and gardens, resource-sharing activities and microenterprise, sidewalks and bike lanes. What are the must-have features of a healthy community? How should small towns and large cities be designed in the future? What does the explosion of mega-metropolises around the world mean to health?

Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, Gabe Klein, Kennedy Odede, Gina Murdock, Belinda Reininger

2014 Aspen Ideas Fesitval
6:22 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Personalized Medicine: The Future is Now

Personalized Medicine: The Future is Now

Personalized medicine is upending hierarchies with consumer products like Scanadu, designed to track physiological signals, and 23andMe.com, which provides raw genetic data. Meanwhile, our exploding knowledge means treatments can increasingly be custom-tailored — the genetic characteristics of a tumor can predict the most effective drug to fight it; a medical image can reveal which artery-opening device will be most effective for a particular individual. How does personalized medicine change the way medicine is practiced? Is it possible to know too much? Does the US need a new regulatory framework for this unprecedented era?

2014 Aspen Ideas Fesitval
1:32 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

The Fight for Good Food

The Fight for Good Food 

Since Sam Kass became senior policy advisor for Nutrition Policy at the White House, five years ago, he has been at the forefront of Michelle Obama’s campaign to convince manufacturers to reduce fat and sodium and add whole grains to their foods. A legacy of the White House will be improving school lunches — if, that is, the improvements the White House won four years ago don’t get rolled back by a Congress that says fruits and vegetables are expensive and kids don’t eat them anyway. Kass will discuss the White House’s priorities and successful strategies, the far-flung effects of the Let’s Move! campaign, and their unexpectedly heated recent fight to keep their lunch legacy alive.

Sam Kass, Corby Kummer

2014 Aspen Ideas Fesitval
11:54 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Women’s Health: The Unfinished Revolution

Women’s Health: The Unfinished Revolution

The phrase “women’s health” slips off the tongues of clinicians, public health experts, community advocates and legislators with ease, but the ideological battles of the past three decades have clouded this once-useful term. Reproductive health services and access to family planning promote health and combat poverty, but they do not represent the sum of women’s health needs or rights. Women also differ from men in how they develop, age, and respond to treatment, yet the science of their unique characteristics is alarmingly incomplete. What is “women’s health” really about, and how we do re-imagine its future?

Jane Otai, Sisonke Msimang, Courtney E. Martin, Betty King

2014 Aspen Ideas Fesitval
10:46 am
Wed June 25, 2014

THE ASPEN LECTURE When Experts Disagree: The Art of Medical Decision-Making

THE ASPEN LECTURE When Experts Disagree: The Art of Medical Decision-Making

Despite medical advances and the application of scientific principles to modern medicine, there seems to be increasing controversy about the “right” diagnostic and treatment choices, even for very common medical issues – such as how best to treat high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol, whether to take vitamins, especially vitamin D, and who should be screened for cancer with mammograms and PSA. And the debate is very public, fomenting confusion with almost daily stories in the media. Why are experts disagreeing? Why isn't there a clear “right” answer? And what support do patients need to make decisions in the face of such controversy?

Jerome Groopman, Pamela Hartzband

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