All Things Considered

Weekdays 4:00-6:00 PM
Melissa Block, Robert Siegel

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. 

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4:11pm

Wed September 11, 2013
The Salt

Pets Or Livestock? A Moral Divide Over Horse Slaughter

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:30 pm

Jamesport has the largest Amish community in Missouri, and horse-pulled buggies are often parked alongside cars. Horse owners in the state are divided over whether to allow horses to be killed for meat in the U.S.
Frank Morris for NPR

Few Americans eat horse meat, and many don't like the idea of slaughtering horses. But a handful of investors are struggling to restart the horse-slaughter industry in the U.S.

Thousands of American horses are already slaughtered in Mexico and Canada each year for their meat, which gets shipped to European and Asian markets.

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4:10pm

Wed September 11, 2013
World

What's Driving Russia's Tactical Change On Syria?

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:14 pm

Russian President Vladimir Putin has called on Syria to turn over its chemical weapons to avoid a strike by the U.S.
Michael Klimentyev/Ria Novosti Reuters/Landov

For months, Russia has been playing a defensive game on Syria, blocking U.N. resolutions that could have led to the ouster of its ally, Syrian President Bashar Assad.

But Russia is now on the offense, running with a plan that could avert U.S.-led strikes against Syria by having Syria place its chemical weapons under international control.

So why the change in tactics?

There are several different strands in Russian thinking on the issue.

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3:59pm

Wed September 11, 2013
All Tech Considered

Army Looks To Schools To Find The Next Cyberwarriors

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 4:50 pm

Security experts say the U.S. is ill-prepared to respond to cyberthreats. A new high school curriculum in Alabama aims to attract more young people to the field.
iStockphoto.com

You can literally see rockets when you drive into Huntsville, Ala., also known as the "Rocket City." NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is here, along with scores of aerospace and defense contractors. The city also has one of the largest fully digital school districts: 24,000 Huntsville City Schools students use laptops or tablets instead of textbooks.

All of this partly explains the new cybersecurity class at Grissom High School. Huntsville City Schools and U.S. Army Cyber Command are developing the curriculum, which will eventually begin in middle school.

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3:12pm

Wed September 11, 2013
Shots - Health News

Proposed Alaska Road Pits Villagers Against Environmentalists

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 4:29 pm

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell (center) gets a tour of King Cove, Alaska.
Annie Feidt Alaska Public Radio Network

The town of King Cove, Alaska, is crowded onto a narrow spit, surrounded by ocean and isolated by rows of volcanic mountains.

It's an Aleut Native community of about a thousand people, and for roughly a third of the year, treacherous winds close its airstrip. There's no road between King Cove and Cold Bay, the nearest town with year-round air facilities. When the weather turns bad, the only way out of King Cove is a two-hour boat trip through choppy seas.

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3:12pm

Wed September 11, 2013
Music Interviews

'Singing Just To Me': Gregory Porter On Musical Inheritance

Originally published on Fri December 13, 2013 12:14 pm

Gregory Porter's latest album is entitled Liquid Spirit.
Shawn Peters Courtesy of the artist

In his first semester playing football at San Diego State University, Gregory Porter severely injured his shoulder. Doctors told him his days on the field were over, but there was some good news: The school would let him keep his athletic scholarship. Suddenly without football, but with a lot of time on his hands, Porter searched for a new calling — and found it in his voice.

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