All Things Considered

Weekdays 4:00-6:00 PM
  • Hosted by Melissa Block, Robert Siegel

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. 

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Carrie Fisher died today. Her long life in show business got an early start. She was the daughter of Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher, both big stars in their own right. She's been known to generations of "Star Wars" fans as Princess Leia.

In San Francisco, companies will pay six-figure salaries to entry-level tech workers from all over the world. So this might come as a surprise: A public university there is laying off some of its own IT staff and sending their jobs to a contractor with headquarters in India.

Until recently, Hank Nguyen's daughter wanted to follow in his footsteps and work in tech. Last spring, she was accepted into the University of California system.

"She was inclined to take computer science and engineering," Nguyen says.

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It's Christmas Eve, and tonight is also the start of Hanukkah. For interfaith families, this intersection can require a little negotiation. Deena Prichep reports.

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Christmas Eve is a great time to catch a glimpse of Santa, whether it's in real life or in one of these movies.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "SANTA CLAUS IS COMIN' TO TOWN")

Jeneyah McDonald is tired of using bottled water for everything: drinking, cooking, bathing.

In order to keep her two children safe, the resident of Flint, Mich., told them the city tap water was poisonous.

"I don't know any way to explain to a 6-year-old why you can't take a bath anymore every day, why you can't help mommy wash the dishes anymore," McDonald said earlier this year. "So I told him it's poison. And that way, he'll know I'm serious — don't play with it."

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We're joined now by Rukmini Callimachi via Skype. She's a correspondent for The New York Times. She covers terrorism. And she says that there are signs that ISIS directed Amri to attack the Christmas market in Berlin. Welcome to the program once again.

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And we're going to stick with President-elect Trump's comments on nuclear weapons for our regular Week in Politics chat. E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution is here in the studio. Hi, E.J.

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When Ebola struck West Africa a few years ago, the world was defenseless. There was no cure. No vaccine. And the result was catastrophic: More than 11,000 people died. Nearly 30,000 were infected.

Now it looks like such a large outbreak is unlikely to ever happen again. Ever.

The world now has a potent weapon against Ebola: a vaccine that brings outbreaks to a screeching halt, scientists report Thursday in The Lancet.

After nearly an hour's flight north from Baghdad, a cavernous C-130 military cargo plane touches down. Aboard are reporters, Pentagon officials and the man who has occasioned this trip, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter.

The plane taxis along an airstrip that as recently as July was controlled — and then largely destroyed — by Islamic State fighters.

This is the Qayyarah Airfield West, just 30 miles south of Mosul.

If you were to witness a bias-based attack or a hate crime, how would you respond?

It's something some activists are preparing some New Yorkers to be ready for, as reports of hate crimes in the city have increased since the election of Donald Trump. They are up 63 percent compared to the same period last year as of Dec. 14, according to the New York City Police Department.

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When Donald Trump won the presidential election, he made a pledge to every citizen: that he would be president for all Americans. In the weeks before Trump's inauguration, we're going to hear about some of the communities that make up this nation, from the people who know them best, in our series Finding America.

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