The Diane Rehm Show

Monday-Friday at 9:00AM

The Diane Rehm Show is produced at WAMU 88.5 and distributed by National Public Radio.

Each week, more than 2.4 million listeners across the country tune in to the program, which has grown from a small local morning call-in show on Washington's WAMU 88.5 to one of public broadcasting's most-listened-to programs. In 2007 and 2008, the show placed among the top ten most powerful public radio programs, based on its ability to draw listeners to public radio stations. It is the only live call-in talk show on the list.

Diane's guests include many of the nation's top newsmakers, journalists and authors. Guests include former president Bill Clinton, General Tommy Franks, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Julie Andrews and Toni Morrison. Newsweek magazine calls the program one of the most interesting talk shows in the country. The National Journal says Diane is "the class act of the talk radio world."

Each hour includes dialogue with listeners who call, e-mail, Tweet or post to Facebook to join Diane's virtual community and take part in a civil exchange of ideas.

Genre: 

Podcasts

  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 10:28am

    Michelangelo created some of the most celebrated works in the history of Western art, including the "Pieta," "David" and the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Born in Italy during the Renaissance, Michelangelo was considered a genius in his own time. He was also known to be egotistical, hot-tempered and consumed by his work. He fought the notion that the artist was simply a craftsman and often clashed with patrons over creative control. Michelangelo insisted that he need answer only to his own muse. In doing so, a new book claims, he revolutionized the practice of art - and the role of the artist in society. A discussion about the life and legacy of Michelangelo.

  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 9:28am

    New York Sen. Charles Schumer recently declared: “Polarization and partisanship are a plague on American politics.” He says one of the main culprits is our party primary system. It is not a new criticism. Political scholars have long argued that when primary elections are restricted to voters from one party, nominees with the most extreme views often win. But some question whether open primaries – where voters can cross party lines -- actually improve the electoral fortunes of moderate candidates. And others worry open primaries dilute a party’s ability to nominate their own candidate without outside interference. Diane and her guests discuss the role of primaries in today’s polarized politics.

  • Wednesday, July 23, 2014 10:28am

    Ifemelu and Obinze are young college students in love when they leave military-ruled Nigeria. She heads to America on a scholarship, while he plunges into an undocumented life in London. For the first time in their lives they grapple with what it means to be black. They are the lead characters in the award-winning novel “Americanah” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. The book is many things: a romance, a story about immigration and a series of observations about race and what it means to be American. A readers’ review discussion of “Americanah.”

  • Wednesday, July 23, 2014 9:28am

    On July 22, two federal appeals courts issued conflicting opinions on Affordable Care Act subsidies for health insurance premiums. The US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled that, per the law as written, only consumers living in states running their own exchanges could possibly qualify for subsidies. Two hours later, an appeals court in Richmond, Virginia ruled that a state’s decision not to run its own exchange did not preclude residents from qualifying for lower premiums. We discuss the Affordable Care Act subsidies and the future of President Barack Obama’s signature legislation.

  • Tuesday, July 22, 2014 10:28am

    Classical music has thrived for centuries. But many say it is now facing its biggest challenges of all time, and risks becoming obsolete. Orchestras across the country face financial trouble, and there’s worry that the younger generations are connecting less and less with Brahms and Debussy. In response, many organizations are venturing into new musical and technological territory to attract loyal audiences…everything from intimate “living room” concerts organized on social media, to collaborations with pop and rock artists. A look at classical music’s place in society, and what’s in store for its future.