The Diane Rehm Show

Monday-Friday at 9:00AM

The Diane Rehm Show is produced at WAMU 88.5 and distributed by National Public Radio.

Each week, more than 2.4 million listeners across the country tune in to the program, which has grown from a small local morning call-in show on Washington's WAMU 88.5 to one of public broadcasting's most-listened-to programs. In 2007 and 2008, the show placed among the top ten most powerful public radio programs, based on its ability to draw listeners to public radio stations. It is the only live call-in talk show on the list.

Diane's guests include many of the nation's top newsmakers, journalists and authors. Guests include former president Bill Clinton, General Tommy Franks, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Julie Andrews and Toni Morrison. Newsweek magazine calls the program one of the most interesting talk shows in the country. The National Journal says Diane is "the class act of the talk radio world."

Each hour includes dialogue with listeners who call, e-mail, Tweet or post to Facebook to join Diane's virtual community and take part in a civil exchange of ideas.

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Podcasts

  • Monday, July 28, 2014 10:28am

    As the 40th anniversary of President Richard Nixon’s resignation approaches, you may think we have learned all there is to know about Watergate. But a key member of Nixon’s White House would disagree. John Dean says he now understands more about Watergate than when he played a central role in the scandal and its resolution. Dean has listened to thousands of hours of Nixon’s secret Oval Office tapes -- many of which he says historians have overlooked. And he’s found a few surprises. Former White House counsel John Dean talks with guest host Susan Page about what he now believes the president knew and when he knew it.

  • Monday, July 28, 2014 9:28am

    In a meeting last week President Barack Obama told the presidents of Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala that many of the children from these countries who have turned themselves into U.S. border agents will need to be sent home. Since last October, approximately 57,000 children from Central America have come to the U.S. With Congress deadlocked on ways to address the current child migration crisis and the larger issue of what to do about the 11 million people in this country without legal authorization, Obama has vowed to fix much of our immigration system on his own. Please join us to discuss next steps for immigration reform.

  • Friday, July 25, 2014 10:28am

    A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories: A blast kills at least sixteen at a UN school used as a civilian shelter in Gaza. The source of the bombing is unclear and Israelis and Palestinians blame each other. Secretary Kerry proposes a weeklong truce. Pro-Russian separatists hamper the international investigation on the downed Malaysian plane in eastern Ukraine. Pro-Russian rebels shoot down two Ukrainian military jets. President Obama meets with Central American presidents on the child migrant crisis. And the Islamist terrorist group Boko Haram is suspected in bombings in Nigeria that kill at least seventy-five people.

  • Friday, July 25, 2014 9:28am

    President Barack Obama meets with Central American leaders today on strategies to stem the flow of migrant children to the border. Prospects for immigration legislation grow dim, with congress down to one week before recess. Two federal appeals courts issue conflicting rulings on the affordable care act, setting the stage for further challenges. David Perdue wins the GOP’s senate runoff in Georgia, pitting him against democrat Michelle Nunn in November. The midterm contest could decide control of the senate. And a botched execution in Arizona takes two hours, one of the longest deaths by lethal injection in U.S. history.

  • Thursday, July 24, 2014 10:28am

    Michelangelo created some of the most celebrated works in the history of Western art, including the "Pieta," "David" and the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Born in Italy during the Renaissance, Michelangelo was considered a genius in his own time. He was also known to be egotistical, hot-tempered and consumed by his work. He fought the notion that the artist was simply a craftsman and often clashed with patrons over creative control. Michelangelo insisted that he need answer only to his own muse. In doing so, a new book claims, he revolutionized the practice of art - and the role of the artist in society. A discussion about the life and legacy of Michelangelo.