Fresh Air

Monday-Thursday at 7pm
Terry Gross

Opening the window on contemporary arts and issues with guests from worlds as diverse as literature and economics.  

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11:45am

Thu July 25, 2013
Author Interviews

A Metro 'Revolution': Cities, Suburbs Do What Washington Can't

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 1:47 pm

Philanthropic and business leaders have come together to revive the core of Detroit, which recently filed for federal bankruptcy protection.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

When Detroit filed for federal bankruptcy protection last week, news accounts were filled with troubling stories of urban decay in the city: vast areas of vacant lots and abandoned houses, shuttered parks, nonworking streetlights and police response times close to an hour.

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11:37am

Thu July 25, 2013
Health Care

For Bioethicist With Ailing Spouse, End-Of-Life Issues Hit Home

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:14 pm

Margaret Battin's husband, Brooke Hopkins, was left quadriplegic after he collided with an oncoming bicycle while cycling down a hill in Salt Lake City.
Courtesy of The New York Times

After writing books and essays about end-of-life issues, and advocating for the right to die, bioethicist Margaret Battin is wrestling with the issue in her own family. Her husband, Brooke Hopkins, an English professor at the University of Utah, where she also teaches, broke his neck in a bicycle accident in 2008, leaving him with quadriplegia and dependent on life support technology. In order to breathe, he requires a ventilator some of the time and a diaphragmatic pacer all the time. He receives his nutrition through a feeding tube.

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12:53pm

Wed July 24, 2013
Book Reviews

'My Lunches With Orson' Puts You At The Table With Welles

Central Press Getty Images

If you asked me to name my favorite movie scene, I'd choose the one in Citizen Kane when newspaper owner Charles Foster Kane steals his rivals' best reporters, then throws a party in his own honor. As musicians literally sing his praises, we watch Kane dance with chorus girls wearing a look of radiant delight. It's a moment bursting with promise and cockiness and joie de vivre, made all the more exuberant because Kane's pleasure is so obviously shared by Welles himself.

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11:01am

Wed July 24, 2013
Author Interviews

After WWII, Europe Was A 'Savage Continent' Of Devastation

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 3:59 pm

In his latest book, Savage Continent, Keith Lowe takes a look at Europe in the years directly following World War II.
Picador

In the introduction to his book, Savage Continent, Keith Lowe writes:

Imagine a world without institutions. No governments. No school or universities. No access to any information. No banks. Money no longer has any worth. There are no shops, because no one has anything to sell. Law and order are virtually non-existent because there is no police force and no judiciary. Men with weapons roam the streets taking what they want. Women of all classes and ages prostitute themselves for food and protection.

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12:18pm

Tue July 23, 2013
Author Interviews

A Reclusive Novelist Reckons With His Legacy '& Sons'

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 12:56 pm

New York City's Central Park
AnnaNem iStockphoto.com

At the center of David Gilbert's new novel & Sons is a famous and famously reclusive writer in the J.D. Salinger model. It's a book about the writer as author of books, and as the father of sons — sons who don't feel nearly as warmly toward him as readers do. When & Sons begins, the writer, Andrew Newbold Dyer — or A.N. Dyer as he's known to his readers — is nearing 80.

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