Here & Now

Monday-Thursday at 12noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

Earlier this year Planet Fitness canceled a woman’s membership after she complained that a transgender woman’s presence in the locker room made her feel unsafe. She’s now suing the gym chain. Planet Fitness says it was not her complaint that led to the decision, but her showing up three days in a row to warn other customers about “a man in the locker room.”

Another Hat In The Ring For House Speaker

Oct 5, 2015

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz declared on Fox News Sunday his candidacy for speaker of the House of Representatives. He is now the third Republican to vie for the seat, along with Majority Leader Kevin O. McCarthy of California and Rep. Daniel Webster of Florida.

Chaffetz’s announcement comes one week after Speaker John Boehner announced he was stepping down at the end of October. NPR’s lead political editor Domenico Montanaro joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to talk about the process of selecting a new speaker of the House.

A collection of stringed instruments, largely silent for seven decades, is giving voice to the horrors of the Holocaust. The “Violins of Hope” were once owned by the inmates of Nazi concentration camps and are now part of a three-month exhibit that opens today in Cleveland. David C. Barnett from Here & Now contributor WCPN has the story behind the violins.

Cancer was once referred to as “The Big C.” Then along came another C. A miracle, really, for so many: chemotherapy. It attacked cancers, prevented them from spreading, and helped so many people into remission. But, of course, it also has debilitating side effects.

Now, a landmark study, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute and published in the New England Journal of Medicine, finds that many women with early stage breast cancer can skip chemotherapy and do just fine.

Computer models are now showing a shrinking likelihood that Joaquin will make landfall in the U.S., even as the hurricane batters the Bahamas with heavy winds, rain and coastal flooding. The National Hurricane Center says the Category 4 storm is “extremely dangerous.”

Official: At Least 7 Dead, 20 Hurt In Oregon Shooting

Oct 1, 2015

A gunman opened fire at an Oregon community college Thursday, killing at least seven people and wounding 20, authorities said.

The shooting happened at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, about 180 miles south of Portland. The local fire district advised people via Twitter to stay away from the school. It later tweeted that there were “multiple casualties” but did not elaborate.

What It's Like To Be A UN Interpreter

Oct 1, 2015

Among the most heard and least recognized players at the United Nations General Assembly session these last two weeks were the interpreters.

A Radio Free Europe journalist once referred to the annual event as the World Cup of professional interpretation, and it’s easy to see why. It can be grueling. One interpreter famously collapsed during a long speech by the late Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi. He had made it through 75 of the speech’s 95 minutes.

In addition to mulling a move of its corporate headquarters out of Connecticut, General Electric has announced it will close a gas engine plant in Waukesha, Wisconsin, and move the 350 jobs to Canada.

Last year, President Obama touted the plant as a proud example of American manufacturing. GE says its closing the Waukesha plant due to Congress’s failure to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank.

“Protected intersections,” designed to prevent car-bicycle collisions, have long existed in the Netherlands, but they are just catching on in the U.S.

After a former video game maker in Oregon created a video (below) explaining the design, one was recently built in Davis, California, and another in Salt Lake City, Utah, and plans are being discussed in cities across the country.