Here & Now

Monday-Thursday at 12noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

Silicon Valley is abuzz as usual. Apple reports its third quarter earnings Tuesday and analysts are expecting around $45 billion in sales. Also Tuesday, the digital currency Bitcoin has split in two after a contentious debate about the speed of its infrastructure. And Facebook attracted much attention with its recent announcement that its artificially intelligent chatbots were shut down after they created their own non-human language.

The Netflix documentary series “The Keepers” tells the story of the murder of Sister Cathy Cesnik, a Baltimore nun and Catholic school teacher who disappeared in November 1969. Her body was eventually found, but the case remains unsolved.

As Republican efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act slow to a halt, Congressional leaders are looking ahead to the next big-ticket item on their agenda: a tax revamp. Republican leaders in the House and Senate released a joint statement last week affirming their commitment to a tax overhaul this year, but with few specific proposals beyond lowering taxes “as much as possible.”

Anthony Scaramucci has reportedly been removed as White House communications director, just days after he took the job. The New York Times and other news organizations report his removal was at the request of new Chief of Staff John Kelly, who was sworn in this morning.

Here & Now’s Robin Young gets the latest from NPR’s Ron Elving (@NPRrelving).

It’s a dark, damp November night when Richard Smith gets off a merchant ship in New York in 1746, and heads, with great purpose, into the streets of Manhattan. But it takes 300 pages of treachery, misunderstanding, adultery, dueling, politics and race to find out what that purpose is.

In May 1969, Jim McCloughan was a 23-year-old private serving as an Army medic in Vietnam. During the ferocious, dayslong battle of Nui Yon Hill, he repeatedly entered the kill zone to rescue wounded soldiers, despite being wounded himself. McCloughan was wounded so badly that an officer suggested he leave the field for treatment. Instead he stayed, risking his life on nine separate occasions to rescue his comrades.

When he was 16 years old, Melvin Caballero left his life of picking coffee in Honduras in search of more opportunity in the United States. Part of the journey involved 36 hours crammed into the back of a sweltering tractor-trailer with one small hole for ventilation.

A New Life For Old School Board Games

Jul 28, 2017

Gaming enthusiasts are everywhere. Kickstarter’s most funded category has long been games — especially board and card games — and hobbyists are also breathing new life into so-called “old school games.”

In the startup-savvy San Francisco Bay Area, they’re trying to take them to the next level. Sonia Paul (@sonipaul) reports for KALW.

There’s been considerable news coverage of the Trump administration, but less about what’s been going on at the Department of Education since Betsy DeVos became secretary of education.

NPR lead education blogger Anya Kamenetz (@anya1anya) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to look at the policy changes DeVos has made in K-12 and higher ed, and where the education budget stands.

This weekend, Tanglewood Music Center in Massachusetts is featuring concerts of the music of French composer Olivier Messiaen and bird walks.

Members of the House Committee on Armed Services meet Thursday to discuss a report from the Government Accountability Office showing lax oversight of the federal program that transfers excess military equipment to civilian law enforcement agencies.

Bass guitarist Jaco Pastorius made a name for himself during his short and troubled life.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson and KCRW jazz DJ Bo Leibowitz listen back to a 1982 performance that is being reissued. We also hear music from the longtime American jazz pianist Ahmad Jamal, among others.

Britain is pledging to ban the sale of new gas- and diesel-powered cars by 2040. Electric, hybrid and fuel cell cars in the U.K. accounted for less than 3 percent of the market in 2015, so the country has a long way to go in phasing out diesel and gas.

A summer hike up to a 13,000-foot alpine meadow can be exhilarating. However the lack of oxygen, frigid temperatures and sparse vegetation would make long-term survival difficult. Archaeologists know hunter-gatherers traversed highland areas thousands of years ago, but presumed they had to spend most of their time in lowland areas.

The new Girl Scouts CEO Sylvia Acevedo comes to the organization from a background in technology, and she’s introducing new achievement badges and other incentives to encourage girls to discover and pursue careers in science and technology.

In a View From The Top conversation, Acevedo (@SylviaAcevedo) talks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about her efforts.

California has the largest number of homeless people living without shelter in the country. More than two-thirds of the state’s 118,000 homeless live on the streets or in tent encampments, many in the state’s largest cities. This is certainly true in Oakland, a city that prides itself on its progressive values.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions says he plans to stay on as the nation’s top prosecutor, despite criticism from President Trump in an interview last week. As attorney general, Sessions has been pursuing a conservative agenda and rolling back Obama-era policies.

President Trump says he wants to let the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, fail. He’s repeated the threat over and over in news conferences and on Twitter.

But NPR’s Alison Kodjak (@alikodjakNPR) reports that the health care law isn’t collapsing on its own: The president and his team are actively undermining the Affordable Care Act markets.

Iraq has declared military victory over ISIS in Mosul, but the painstaking process of rooting out the group’s influence in the devastated city continues.

Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins talks with France 24 journalist Simona Foltyn (@simonafoltyn), who went door to door in Mosul with counterterrorism officials searching for ISIS supporters.

There was a time when Google Glass was deemed the future — one in which people might walk the streets wearing a glass tab over one eye to display information beamed from their smartphones. But after criticism and safety concerns, the idea was killed as a consumer project.

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