Here & Now

Monday-Thursday at 12noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

Uber reached a settlement in class-action lawsuits in California and Massachusetts, allowing the company to continue to classify workers as independent contractors rather than employees.

The settlement calls for Uber to pay as much as $100 million to about 385,000 drivers represented in the cases, but it allows the ride-hailing company to avoid having to pay minimum wage or contribute to workers’ Social Security.

The Treasury Department announced yesterday that Harriet Tubman will soon become the first African-American to be on the front of a currency bill, and the first woman on U.S. currency in a century.

Tubman, who’s best known for her work as an abolitionist, and a so-called conductor on the Underground Railroad, will replace President Andrew Jackson, a slave owner and anti-abolitionist, on the front of the $20.

Remembering The Life And Legacy Of Prince

Apr 21, 2016

Pop superstar Prince, widely acclaimed as one of the most inventive musicians of his era with hits including “Little Red Corvette,” “Let’s Go Crazy” and “When Doves Cry,” was found dead at his home on Thursday in suburban Minneapolis, according to his publicist.

His publicist, Yvette Noel-Schure, told The Associated Press that the music icon died at his home in Chanhassen. No details were immediately released.

Saudi Arabia warned last week that it would sell its investments in the U.S. if Congress passes a bill allowing victims of terror attacks like 9/11 to sue foreign governments. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with business journalist Ali Velshi about the impact if Saudi Arabia followed through on the threat.

Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew has decided to put Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill, making her the first woman on U.S. paper currency in 100 years, a Treasury official said Wednesday.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity in advance of Lew’s official announcement, said that the 19th century abolitionist and a leader of the Underground Railroad, would replace the portrait of Andrew Jackson, the nation’s seventh president.

Lew’s announcement is expected to provide details on other changes being made to the $20, $10 and $5 bills.

Michigan’s attorney general filed felony and misdemeanor charges Wednesday against three state and city environmental managers in connection with the lead contamination of the Flint water supply. The charges are the first to be filed in the ongoing state investigation into the contaminated water. A federal investigation is also ongoing. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Lindsey Smith, who covers the Flint crisis for contributor station Michigan Radio.

President Obama met Saudi Arabia’s King Salman in Riyadh today. The president’s final visit to the kingdom comes during a time of strained relations. The Saudis are concerned about the U.S. nuclear deal with Iran and the fight against ISIS. On President Obama’s agenda are questions about Saudi Arabia’s human rights record. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Greg Myre of NPR about the issues involved in the talks.

Across the country, school districts get their funding from property taxes. But the Texas Supreme Court will soon rule on a challenge to that system, which opponents say short-changes poor children and those whose parents don’t speak English.

Ahead of today’s New York’s primary, many polls showed Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton comfortably ahead of her rival, Bernie Sanders. But Sanders, who has drawn big crowds at his New York rallies, says polls can be wrong. What is the outlook for Sanders in New York and beyond? NPR’s lead political editor Domenico Montenaro addresses that question in his conversation with Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

As New York State votes in the primaries today, Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with veteran Democratic U.S. Rep. Louise Slaughter, one of the longest-serving women in Congress. They discuss the issues that matter most to her constituents and why she’s stumping for Hillary Clinton.

President Obama recently described the lack of planning for post-civil war Libya as the worst mistake of his presidency. Shahrazad Kablan advised the White House during the Libyan civil war, and tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that she is disappointed with the president’s comments and his Libya policy.

Here & Now’s Robin Young sat down with Linda Stasi, the longtime firebrand columnist for the New York Daily News, the left-leaning tabloid with the wild front pages (see some of them below). Stasi talked about the presidential campaign and the boost that Donald Trump has given her paper.

Stasi also addressed concerns that the New York Daily News and her coverage of Trump have helped to create him as a national candidate. “We did not create him, we put him on steroids,” she said.

Prices on crude oil dropped Monday as OPEC members failed to reach an agreement on freezing oil production. Jill Schlesinger of CBS News joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain this, as well as the latest step in Amazon’s plan to expand its business in streaming video.

As the final weekend of campaigning in New York State approaches, the Democratic primary race is tightening. Hillary Clinton has now appeared on a ballot four times in New York, twice for a U.S. Senate seat and twice as a presidential candidate.

Reporter Brian Mann of Here & Now contributor North Country Public Radio explores what Clinton’s past campaigns might tell us about this year’s race. Sixteen years ago, Mann trekked along as the then-first lady stumped for votes in her first campaign, a historic bid for a U.S. Senate seat.

Sounds of Akron poster

For the past year, residents of Akron, Ohio, have been collecting soundbites from their city for a new symphony. On Saturday night, they will hear their contributions in the final product.

Bernie Sanders' Burlington Political Roots

Apr 15, 2016

Bernie Sanders might be from Brooklyn, but he’s spent his political career in Vermont. Anthony Brooks of Here & Now contributor WBUR, traveled to Burlington, where Sanders’ political career began, and where the passion for his political agenda still shapes the city.

How To Make Really Good Pizza At Home

Apr 14, 2016

Americans spend $30 billion a year on take-out pizza. But Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst says making pizza at home is cheaper, easier than you might think and tastes great! She joins hosts Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young with samples and these recipes:

In New Zealand, an octopus named Inky has captured the world’s attention with his crafty escape from the National Aquarium. Inky slipped out of his tank, slithered across the floor and disappeared through a drain pipe and into the ocean.

The escape happened three months ago, but only came to light this week. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Roger Hanlon, an octopus expert and senior scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, about Inky and the antics of other octopuses.

Behind The Furious Debate Over GMO Crops

Apr 14, 2016

Genetically engineered crops, commonly called GMOs (genetically modified organisms), trigger lively discussions over the way they are created. For the farmers who grow them, many feel they are a wonder of technology. For those opposed, the plants represent everything they feel is wrong with modern agriculture. Luke Runyon of Here & Now contributor Harvest Public Media explains what people are really arguing about.

Around the world, subway projects are booming. New metros have sprung up or are in the works in Brazil, Saudi Arabia and India, and China announced several years ago that it would build 25 new subway systems. But in the United States, investment in new subways has lagged.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks to Fred Salvucci, senior lecturer in civil and environmental engineering at MIT and former Massachusetts Secretary of Transportation, about what state and local governments should be doing about transportation for the future.

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