Here & Now

Monday-Thursday at 12noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

Yemeni officials say the president has resigned under pressure from Shiite rebels who seized the capital in September and have confined the embattled leader to his home for the past two days.

Presidential officials said Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi resigned after being pressured to make concessions to the rebels, known as Houthis. He had earlier pledged political concessions in return for the rebels withdrawing from his house and the nearby presidential palace, but Houthi fighters remained deployed around both buildings throughout the day.

President Obama in his State of the Union talked a lot about income inequality. But what happens when that income inequality occurs within one’s own family: one sibling is significantly richer or poorer? How does that affect family dynamics?

In his State Of The Union address, President Obama outlined a program to boost the middle class, in part by raising taxes on the wealthy.

Republican Senator John Thune blasted the president’s plan, calling it an “agenda of top-down policies of the past to tax, spend and regulate.”

He joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with more reaction to the speech.

Wal-Mart will offer cash tax refunds to taxpayers this year at all of its stores. And the big box retailer won’t charge customers to pick up their refunds.

Wal-Mart is touting the “Direct2Cash” program as more convenient than cashing a check, but of course it also conveniently puts customers in Wal-Mart with cash in hand.

The Charlie Hebdo attacks turned a spotlight on a part of France tourists don’t often see: the suburbs or banlieues that ring Paris, many of which are home to high concentrations of young Muslims.

After the attacks, an association representing 120 French mayors issued a statement warning that the economic disparities these young Muslims face must be addressed. Young Muslims were quoted saying they feel like they live in another country, and want to be regarded as truly French.

New NCAA Policy Hands Over Some Power

Jan 20, 2015

The organization that governs college sports is allowing five major athletic conferences to make some of their own rules. It’s a major change for an association that’s not known for change.

The conferences approved a new policy at the recent NCAA Convention, which will allow those conferences to fully fund athletic scholarships, because right now those scholarships do not really cover the full cost of attending college.

The NCAA also allowed athletes to participate in the convention for the first time.

On Tuesday, new data from the National Bureau of Statistics of China reported that the economy expanded at an annual rate of 7.3 percent in the last quarter of 2014.

Most countries would welcome growth like that, but for China it represents a slowdown. In fact, according to the new data, China grew at its slowest rate in 24 years last year.

Jason Bellini of the Wall Street Journal discusses the details of the downturn with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

A Story Of Kindness In Venice, Italy

Jan 19, 2015

As Parkinson’s disease worsened for Bernard Michaels, his family took him on a final trip to Europe. Early in the trip, a slip in Venice, Italy landed him in the hospital.

His daughter, Sonia, set out with a collapsible wheelchair to meet him, but 17 staired footbridges, slick with rain, stood between them. Fortunately, others took notice.

Boris Fishman‘s “A Replacement Life” comes out in paperback this week. The debut novel was named one of the “100 Notable Books of 2014″ by The New York Times.

“A Replacement Life” centers around Slava, an immigrant from the former Soviet Union. Though Slava wants to forget his roots, his grandfather pulls him into a scheme of writing fraudulent petitions for Holocaust reparations.

Fox News has apologized for an interview in which the guest called Birmingham, England a “totally Muslim” city, where non-Muslims don’t go.

Fox terrorism expert Steven Emerson used that description about the United Kingdom’s second largest city in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris. Emerson said there were areas in many parts of Europe where non-Muslims simply don’t go.

The comments were widely ridiculed, and that led Fox host Jeanine Pirro to interrupt a recent broadcast with an apology.

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