Here & Now

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Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

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NPR Story
12:21 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Primary Election Campaigns Focusing On Family Ties

Dad, father, daughter, son and husband are all common words popping up in election ads this year, as family seems to be the theme in political campaigns this year.

Here & Now media analyst John Carroll discusses the trend with Here & Now’s about the familial trend.

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NPR Story
12:21 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Recently Ousted Jill Abramson Delivers Commencement Speech

Former New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson made her first public comments since being fired, when she spoke to graduates of Wake Forest’s class of 2014.

She had agreed to deliver today’s commencement address several months before her very public fallout with the newspaper last week.

Abramson’s abrupt ouster has raised questions about her management style, her compensation and whether gender bias plays a role in any of the controversy.

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NPR Story
2:23 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

U.K., France Compete For China's Tourists

People from China are considered the world’s top tourists. Studies show that on average they spend more money than people from other countries do.

This is a relatively new development because China’s economy has boomed and government restrictions on travel have been eased. The middle class now has money. They want to see the world and of course there are millions of them.

The BBC’s China correspondent Carrie Gracie reports on what Britain and France are doing to attract them.

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NPR Story
2:23 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

How A Quarrel In Panama Is Making Waves In Miami

Epic Endeavor: Building the Panama Canal's wider locks. (Panama Canal Authority)

The brand new PortMiami tunnel is set to open next week. It’s a billion dollar project that’s been in the works for more than four years. The tunnel will take trucks and cruise passenger traffic under Biscayne Bay, rather than through downtown Miami.

It’s the centerpiece of the $2 billion makeover of the Port of Miami, which was done largely so the city can capitalize on another major expansion going on more than 1,000 miles to the south: the widening of the Panama Canal, to accommodate bigger ships carrying more cargo.

But the Panama Canal project is now in limbo.

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NPR Story
2:23 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Woman Organizes Against Police Killings In Brazil Ahead Of World Cup

Riot police stand near the Arena Corinthians stadium during a protest of the Workers Without a Roof Movement (MTST) against the upcoming FIFA World Cup Brazil 2014 in Sao Paulo on May 15, 2014. The Arena Corinthians will host the opening match of the FIFA World Cup Brazil 2014 on June 12, between Brazil and Croatia. (Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images)

The World Cup kicks off in Brazil in less than a month, and preparations are still ongoing — three stadiums are still under construction.

Boston resident Liz Martin is worried that part of the preparations for the World Cup will include more violence by the police.

Amnesty International reports that Brazil’s police are responsible for about 2,000 deaths each year, one of the highest rates in the world.

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