Here & Now

Monday-Thursday at 12noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

At the Trump Tower in New York City, real estate magnate and TV celebrity Donald Trump declared he would be “the greatest jobs president that God ever created.” He becomes the 12th candidate for the Republican nomination. We listen to excerpts of his speech.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The number of Chinese millionaires great by a million in 2014. A report out today by the Boston Consulting Group says a strong Chinese stock market helped make the rich even richer. As Chinese wealth grows, so too does the country’s demand from travel. About a decade ago, fewer than 200,000 Chinese tourists visited the U.S. Last year, that number reached about 2 million. The rise of the Chinese middle class and new U.S.

Match CEO Explains The Algorithms Of Love

Jun 15, 2015

One of the biggest online dating sites, Match, turned 20 this year, and a lot has changed since it debuted in 1995. It used to be there was a stigma attached to online dating, but not so much anymore. The Pew Research Center recently recently found a majority of Americans now say online dating is a good way to meet people.

CVS announced today that it will pay $1.9 billion to buy Target’s 1,700 pharmacies and clinics. The purchase will give CVS, the second largest drugstore chain in the country, a chance to expand into some new markets.

The deal will also allow Target to hand off its pharmacies, which had not been as profitable as its other retail departments. Here & Now’s Robin Young talks with with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News about the purchase.

Half Marathons Race To The Front

Jun 12, 2015

In some ways it’s easy to explain the growing popularity of the half marathon. It’s obviously not as long as the 26.2 mile race, but you feel a sense of accomplishment that’s similar to finishing a marathon when you cross the line after running half that distance. Last year for the first time ever in the U.S., more than 2 million people finished half marathons, according to survey out this month from Running USA. That survey also shows that among core runners nationwide, the half marathon (13.1 miles) is now the favorite distance.

The tensions between African-American communities and the police officers have become a continuing conversation across the nation as images of the incidents trend on social media and dominate the news.

While the issue has reached the forefront of the American conscience, it is nothing new. NPR’s Michel Martin speaks with civil rights advocate John Mack, who is the former president of the Los Angeles Police Commission, about his work in the department and the issues facing police.

A Cleveland municipal court judge has ruled that there is enough evidence to charge two police officers in the death of Tamir Rice.

The 12-year-old boy was playing with a pellet gun in a park last November when he was shot twice by police. Judge Ronald Adrine found probable cause to charge Officer Timothy Loehmann – who fired the shot – with murder, involuntary manslaughter, reckless homicide and dereliction of duty, and his partner Officer Frank Garmback with negligent homicide and dereliction of duty.

Jazz saxophonist and composer Ornette Coleman died early this morning at the age of 85 in a hospital in Manhattan. The cause was cardiac arrest. He’s being remembered as one of the most powerful and influential innovators in the history of jazz.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A convoy of brightly decorated cars will roll through San Francisco this weekend. It’s one of several “art car” events that take place across the country each year.

What started as a small, motorized procession of hippie artists in their mobile sculptures has grown into an almost cult-like phenomenon. It all began nearly three decades ago in Houston. That’s where we met a group of young “cartists” preparing for their first parade.

In our weekly look at how the news is reverberating through social media, Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Julia Turner, editor-in-chief of Slate. They discuss a new video showing a white police officer kicking a black man, which is now the subject of an investigation, and director John Waters’ graduation speech to students at the Rhode Island School of Design.

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