Here & Now

Monday-Thursday at 12noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

Several of the nation’s largest companies, including Starbucks, CVS and Walmart, have signed on to a pledge to hire 100,000 16 to 24-year-olds who are out of school and out of work.

It’s called the 100,000 Opportunities Initiative, and it’s designed to target “disconnected youth.” Roben Farzad, the host of Full Disclosure on NPR One, discusses this with Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti.

Baby Rhino Rescued In Northeast India

Jul 10, 2015

An baby rhino has been rescued Kaziranga National Park in northeast India. It is monsoon season in the park right now and not uncommon for young rhinos to get separated from their parents on the trek to higher land.

Now that the small rhino, just a few weeks old, is safe in the care of the International Fund for Animal Welfare and the Wildlife Trust of India, what happens next?

Here & Now concludes a series of conversations about Iraq and ISIS with someone who served in the Iraq War.

Retired Marine Matt Victoriano, who served as a scout and sniper team leader from 2000 to 2004, participated in the invasion of Iraq in 2003 and returned to conduct combat operations in Al Anbar and Babylon provinces.

Cameras orbiting the earth are becoming less expensive and therefore more widespread. And as Bloomberg News reports, the images collected are providing a lot of economic information, to everyone from investors to aid organizations.

Jeff Kearns writes in Bloomberg:

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is signaling diplomats won’t conclude an Iran nuclear agreement by early Friday morning, complicating American efforts to quickly implement any deal.

Under U.S. law, the seven nations negotiating in Vienna have to complete the accord before the end of Thursday in Washington to avoid invoking a 60-day congressional review period during which the Obama administration cannot waive sanctions on Iran.

If they meet the target, the review would only be 30 days.

DJ Session: Gospel Sunday

Jul 9, 2015

We turn to the music of the church pews for this week’s edition of the Here & Now DJ Sessions. Our guide to gospel is Cecilia Webb, host of “Train to Glory” Sunday mornings on KUNM in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Webb says the music that began during American slavery is evolving, with some artists bringing in sounds of hip hop, rhythm and blues, and rock.

Officials at the New York Stock Exchange say a nearly four-hour halt in trading yesterday was the result of a technical problem. But most investors didn’t really feel the impact of the shutdown. The NYSE is now just one of many exchanges to choose from.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax about the glitch and its effects.

Showtime Vs. HBO: A Fair Fight?

Jul 8, 2015

Showtime brings back two hit shows this Sunday: “Masters of Sex,” about a pair of sexuality researchers working in the ’50s and ’60s, and “Ray Donovan,” centered on a clean-up guy for Los Angeles’ rich and famous.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to talk about the premieres and how Showtime might set itself apart from HBO.

Imagine it’s the final game of the season. The stakes are high and suddenly, a quarter of your team is subbed out and replaced with – rookies.

That’s how some people in medicine describe what happens each July when senior residents move on, and a wave of 30,000 or so newly minted doctors begin their residencies at hospitals across the country.

Update 3:15 p.m.: Trading on the New York Stock Exchange has resumed.

The New York Stock Exchange says a technical problem that has suspended trading since late morning is an internal technical issue and not the result of a security breach.

The exchange made the statement in a tweet on its official Twitter account. The trading halt is ongoing.

NYSE-listed stocks are still trading on other exchanges. The Nasdaq and other exchanges are unaffected by the outage.

Pages