Here & Now

Monday-Thursday at 12noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

Have you ever thought about what makes a face feminine? According to one of the surgeons who pioneered facial feminization surgery, what makes a face feminine isn’t easy to define.

“We hear beauty is only skin deep; it’s not,” Spiegel says. “It has to do a lot with the bones. When we change the face, I need to change the bones. And then the skin is almost like clothing. If a woman puts on a man’s shirt it still looks like a woman…. so the skin, if it sits on the right way on the facial structures, we start to get the right cues.”

Could The Paris Attacks Happen In The U.S.?

Nov 17, 2015

In Paris today, Secretary of State John Kerry said the world needs to go after ISIS where the militants are planning their attacks. Kerry met today with France’s President François Hollande, who will come to Washington next week to meet with President Obama.

Daniel Benjamin, director of the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth College, speaks with Here & Now‘s Indira Lakshmanan about Kerry’s meeting and the next steps in the fight against the Islamic State.

Hannover’s police chief says authorities have cancelled a friendly soccer match between Germany and the Netherlands because they had “concrete information” about a bomb threat.

The German news agency dpa quoted police chief Volker Kluwe saying the information concerned an explosives attack. The stadium was evacuated by police about an hour and a half before the kickoff Tuesday night in the northern German city.

After the Paris terrorist attacks, Secretary of State John Kerry and President Barack Obama joined French President Francois Holland in calling the Islamic State militant group “Daesh.”

At a press conference today, President Obama returned to using the term “ISIL” (Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant), which is a variation of ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria).

Here & Now’s Indira Lakshmanan talks with Abderrahim Foukara of Al Jazeera about these different names, their roots and the politics behind them.

India has a sizable Muslim minority. At 168 million people, it’s the second-largest Muslim population in the world. Since the Hindu nationalist leader Narendra Modi took power as prime minister last year, many say things are getting worse for ordinary Muslim citizens in India.

European financial markets today opened for the first time since Friday’s attacks in Paris, and there was little reaction. Paris’s CAC 40 is holding steady, as are Germany’s DAX and London’s FTSE.

Does that mean the attacks won’t have much of an economic impact? CBS’s Jill Schlesinger speaks with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about this and some other business stories.

English As A Global Language

Nov 13, 2015

A growing number of schools in the United States are adopting bilingual education, while at the same time, more people around the world are learning English. Technology is helping English spread around the world, and English has become the lingua franca of business, science and technology.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Salikoko Mufwene, professor of linguistics at the University of Chicago, about how this affects other languages around the world.

Is it ethical to wear fur? That has been a debate for decades now. Most fur sold today is taken from farm-raised animals, which animal rights activists oppose. They argue that no animal should be killed for the sake of fashion.

Classic Comics Return To Your Doorstep

Nov 13, 2015

It used to be that people bought the Sunday newspaper to read the comics – at least that was one of the reasons. This Sunday, hundreds of papers around the country will include a special 16-page insert of classic comic strips.

The occasion marks the 100th anniversary of King Features, which syndicates older strips such as “Blondie,” and “Beetle Bailey” and newer ones such as “Mutts.”

Comics scholar A. David Lewis joins Here & Now‘s Indira Lakshmanan to talk about the commemoration of classic comics this weekend.

The numbers aren’t as large as the flow into other European countries, but there are some refugees seeking asylum who are making their way into Norway through Russia.

The interesting thing about their story is that they ride bikes across the border to get around the rule that crossing by foot is not allowed. Here & Now’s Indira Lakshmanan checks in with BBC correspondent Tim Whewell, who has seen this occur.