Here & Now

Monday-Thursday at 12noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

Thousands of protesters have descended on a quiet part of North Dakota, occasionally clashing with security personnel over plans to build an oil pipeline under the Missouri River.

Lawsuits are pitting Native American tribes and environmental activists against the Energy Transfer Partners pipeline company.

Amy Sisk, a reporter with Inside Energy, discusses the latest with Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are preparing for what’s being billed as the marquee moment of the long campaign season: the first presidential debate, which will take place on September 26 in New York.

Trump spent Saturday visiting a black church in Detroit. The move was aimed less at trying to win over the black vote, but instead at cooling claims that he’s insensitive to minorities.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young discusses the latest news from the campaign trail with NPR’s Ron Elving.

Former Stanford student Brock Turner was released from jail Friday.

Turner served three months of a six month sentence for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman in January 2015. The case set off a national outcry, with many arguing that the six month sentence was too lenient.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets an update from KQED’s Beth Willon.

Hurricane Hermine made landfall in Florida overnight, before it was downgraded to tropical storm status.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott said Hermine may be responsible for claiming the life of a man who died after he was hit by a tree. Forecasters say the storm most likely will cause flooding in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic states.

This summer has been tough, with record heat, drought, floods and wildfires across much of the country. But in 1816, it wasn’t hot weather people endured. It was bitter cold.

The year came to be known as the “Year Without a Summer.” There was frost and snow all summer long, and it may have been a first taste of how a changing climate can affect peoples’ lives.

The film “The Light Between Oceans” opens tomorrow. The film is based on the best-selling novel by M.L. Stedman. Derek Cianfrance adapted the novel for screen and directed the movie, in which Michael Fassbender stars.


When it comes to the future of medicine, few therapies get people as excited as stem cells.

Researchers are looking at them for future treatment for diseases like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Type 1 Diabetes and more. But the key word is “future.” Progress with stem cell therapies has been slow and the few clinical trials taking place are in their infancy.

Yet despite the lack of FDA-approved treatments, stem cell clinics — which promise cures for conditions as varied as arthritis, pulmonary disorders and orthopedics — are popping up all over the country.

Mexicans by and large have been excoriating their president for inviting Donald Trump for what looked like a state visit yesterday.

Journalist Esteban Illades of the Mexican news site Nexos called it “the most painful day in the history of the Mexican presidency.” Illades joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young with more about how the country is reacting to Trump’s trip.

The great comic actor Gene Wilder died Monday at age 83 from Alzheimer’s disease.

Known for his roles in such films as “Young Frankenstein,” “Blazing Saddles” and “Willie Wonka And The Chocolate Factory,” Wilder’s performances delighted audiences for decades.

Here & Now pays tribute by revisiting host Robin Young’s 2005 interview with Wilder about his then-new memoir, “Kiss Me Like a Stranger.”

Here’s the raw audio from their interview:


The worst bus stop in America is a small patch of concrete at the intersection of Route 29 and Crestmoor Drive in Silver Spring, Maryland.

That’s, at least, according to the transit website Streetsblog USA, which held a bracket contest to find the country’s sorriest bus stops.

Common, the hip-hop artist from Chicago, has been on the rap scene since the early-1990s. He branched into acting in the 2000s, and he recently started the Common Ground Foundation, a non-profit that aims to empower underprivileged young pepole through creative arts, mentoring, and educational opportunities.

He’s also working with Allstate on a scholarship program for students at historically black colleges.

The White House announced today that President Barack Obama will expand the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument off the coast of Hawaii, creating the world’s largest marine protected area.

The move quadruples the size of the monument from 50 miles to 200 miles. But it’s caused some controversy in Hawaii.

The University of Virginia is facing criticism for raising the cost of tuition for students over the last few years while at the same time, setting aside more than $2 billion in an investment fund.

Many major universities have these funds, but UVA’s is among the biggest for a public school. Today, the state legislature’s subcommittee on higher education will question top university officials about the fund, including President Teresa Sullivan.

Here are some of Sullivan’s remarks from her appearance before a Friday joint meeting of the Virginia State Legislature:

Across the country, the death penalty is on the decline.

Twenty states and the District of Columbia have abolished it, and four others have issued a moratorium on executions. Last year, 50 people were sentenced to death, less than half the number six years ago. But the majority of those sentences were handed down in just 16 counties, out of 3,000 counties in the United States.

Hope is dwindling for finding survivors in central Italy, where more than 267 people were killed in Wednesday’s 6.2-magnitude earthquake.

Questions are now being raised over how the massive destruction could have been prevented. But in a country filled with ancient and medieval architecture, that task can be difficult and expensive.

Republican Presidential hopeful Donald Trump was on the campaign trail again last night, stopping in Jackson, Mississippi to rally supporters.

In his speech, he reiterated many of his economic and national security plans, and tailored many of his comments towards African-American and Hispanic voters.

Trump was also joined on stage by former U.K. Independence Party leader Nigel Farage, who was instrumental in pushing through the Brexit vote for Britain to leave the European Union.

Last month, Here & Now spoke with a U.S. Air Force captain departing for Mongolia to compete in the world’s longest and toughest horse race. The Mongol Derby spans more than 600 miles and takes about 10 days.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti checks in with Capt. Tim Finley to see how he did.

Scientists announced the discovery of a habitable planet Wednesday, orbiting the solar system’s nearest neighboring sun Proxima Centauri.

Rumors of the finding circulated for several days and were confirmed by the European Southern Observatory (ESO), which added more details in a press conference.

Kelly Beatty of Sky & Telescope talks about the planet with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson.

Italian Premier Matteo Renzi says the death toll from the quake that hit central Italy has risen.

Renzi spoke Wednesday evening in the provincial capital of Rieti after visiting rescue crews and survivors in the hard-hit town of Amatrice and flying over other demolished towns in nearby Le Marche region.

When companies know about problems, they’re often reluctant to admit them publicly.

But it’s better when they do, because when the media exposes their problems, the negative publicity can do lasting damage. Recent examples include Volkswagen and Theranos.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti hears more from Curt Nickisch, senior editor at Harvard Business Review.