Here & Now

Monday-Thursday at 12noon
  • Hosted by Robin Young & Jeremy Hopson

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews.

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.1 million weekly listeners on 325 stations across the country.

Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

Despite intense lobbying by human rights groups, Amnesty International has voted to support the decriminalization of the sex trade.

The group says the policy is based on the idea that sex between consenting adults should not be subject to state interference. They believe it is the best way to protect sex workers and will help make their lives safer.

We sit down with Jim McGuinn, host of the show “Teenage Kicks” on Minnesota Public Radio’s music station The Current. He brings us some sounds from the 1970s, 80s and 90s.

Music From The Segment

The Undertones, “Teenage Kicks”

[Youtube]

Gas prices are low, but are they low enough?

Oil is down to a six-year low of $43 per barrel, so why aren’t gas prices dirt cheap? And how will these prices translate to the airline industry?

Marilyn Geewax, NPR’s senior business editor, speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about where gas prices are going.

The War Comes Home For Baby Boomer Veterans

Aug 11, 2015

The Vietnam War ended decades ago. Veterans from that conflict are now in their 60’s, and starting to retire. And with retirement, for some, there’s a troubling realization that they have deep wounds from the war that have never healed because they’ve never been dealt with.

Phoenix, Arizona, has been called the world’s least sustainable city. But the city is on a mission to change that in at least one area: garbage.

City leaders have set a goal of reducing the amount of trash sent to city landfills by 40 percent over the next five years. And they also hope to become leaders in waste innovation.

Phoenix city manager Ed Zuercher talks with Here & Now’s Robin Young about changing the ways of waste.

China devalued its currency on Tuesday, surprising global investors and worrying economists. The move was the most significant devaluation to the yuan since 1994 and the Chinese currency proceeded to drop nearly two percent in trading against the U.S. dollar.

Gregory Maguire is known for re-imagining classic tales, for example in his “Wicked Years” books he put his spin on L. Frank Baum’s “The Wizard of Oz.” For “Egg and Spoon” he explores pre-revolutionary Russia, incorporating magical figures from tales he read in his childhood.

Utilities and residents along Colorado’s Animas River and New Mexico’s San Juan River are scrambling to find alternative water sources following an accidental mine spill over the weekend.

A cleanup crew supervised by the Environmental Protection Agency last week inadvertently leaked 3 million gallons of orange-colored toxic wastewater into the Animas, which runs into the San Juan. The crew was trying to treat water inside an abandoned gold mine when the accident occurred.

What's Showing In Iowa And New Hampshire?

Aug 10, 2015

With six months left until the Iowa caucuses, urgency is starting to creep up on candidates for both parties to gain ground. In today’s political world, that means a flurry of political ads.

Here & Now’s media analyst John Carroll talks with Robin Young about the ads the candidates have released for the early primary states, and what they show about their respective strategies going forward.

[Youtube]

'The Blob' Takes Over The West Coast

Aug 7, 2015

Since 2013, a patch of unusually warm water known as “the blob” has been spreading across the Pacific Ocean right off the U.S. coast, causing problems both at sea and on land.

The increased temperatures in typically temperate climates like Puget Sound and the Gulf of Alaska have made it hard for cold-water species to thrive, leading to an increase in toxic algal blooms – unwelcome changes that have made Washington shut down multiple fishing industries.

Pages