Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00AM-9:00AM
Renee Montagne, Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Genre: 

Pages

4:09am

Thu April 17, 2014
Around the Nation

Lost Sea Lion Pup Found In California Almond Orchard

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 4:43 am

The pup was discovered 100 miles from the ocean. It mostly likely swam up the San Joaquin River, hopped out and couldn't find its way back.

3:31am

Thu April 17, 2014
Race

Probe: Gains Of Integration Eroded, Especially In The South

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 5:41 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Kelly McEvers.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

This spring will mark 60 years since Brown versus Board of Education. That's the Supreme Court ruling that was intended to end segregation in America's public schools. But a year-long study by the investigative journalism group ProPublica finds that we've never gotten to that goal. In fact, America in recent decades has been moving backward.

Read more

3:07am

Thu April 17, 2014
NPR Story

The Origins Of The Domesticated Chili Pepper

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 5:41 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Researchers believe they've discovered the origin of another pepper: The domesticated chili pepper, now the most widely grown spice crop in the world.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The birthplace of the world's favorite spice is a fertile valley in East Central Mexico, between Oaxaca and Veracruz, not in the northeastern part of the country as previously thought.

MCEVERS: The Sacramento Bee reports the project conducted at the University of California, Davis was pretty complex. They used archaeology, genetics...

Read more

3:07am

Thu April 17, 2014
NPR Story

Spring Breakers Who Want Snow And Thrills Ski Tuckerman's Ravine

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 11:21 am

On a clear weekend day, as many as 3,000 people will make the 3-mile trek up the side of New Hampshire's Mount Washington to the snowfields, defying steep terrain and the threat of avalanches.

3:07am

Thu April 17, 2014
NPR Story

Does Business Innovation Depend On A CEO's Age?

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 5:41 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

One of the keys to success for a company or even a country is the ability to innovate, to create new ideas and products that change how people work, live and behave. And there's now new research suggesting that innovation could depend on the age of the people in charge. Of course innovation is just one measure of success. NPR's social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam has returned to join us. Shankar, good morning to you.

SHANKAR VEDANTAM, BYLINE: Hi, David.

GREENE: So what's this new research about?

Read more

Pages