Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00AM-9:00AM
Renee Montagne, Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Ecstatic Voices
12:56 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Across America, Voices Rise To Reinvent India

Kanniks with the choir at St. Johns Unitarian Church in Cincinnati in 2004.
Courtesy of Kanniks Kannikeswaran

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 2:20 pm

When I visit Kanniks Kannikeswaran on a weekday evening, he is warming up his choir in the meeting room of a civic center in suburban Cincinnati.

"Breathe in the cosmic energy," he says to the choir. The response is a collective "Ommmmmm ..."

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U.S. Commutes: The Way We Get To Work
12:55 am
Thu November 7, 2013

To Get Around Town, Some Cities Take A Step Back In Time

Construction of the Atlanta streetcar line has hurt many businesses along the route, but there is hope that economic gains will increase once the line opens next spring.
Kathy Lohr NPR

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 10:17 am

This story is part of a project on commuting in America.

Cities across the country are investing in old-fashioned streetcars to solve what's known as the "last mile" problem. The hope is that trolleys will make it easier for people to get to their final destination.

Atlanta is one of the latest, laying steel rails for a 2.6 mile line. The tracks will run downtown from Peachtree Street to the Martin Luther King Jr. historic district on the east side of the city. Some see this as a big step forward.

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Around the Nation
5:12 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Why Are Thousands Of Weddings Planned For Next Tuesday?

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 6:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The new century has offered a bonanza of special dates for weddings. Like one Saturday in 2007, lucky 7/7/7, when 65,000 couples got married. The annual survey for David's Bridal estimates more than 3,000 couples will wed next Tuesday. Yes, it's a Tuesday but it's 11/12/13. Those who miss that sequential date have one last chance for a cool number next year - 12/13/14. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Television
5:08 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Norwegian Broadcaster Lures Viewers With 100 Hours Of Chess

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with the Norwegian TV listings. Americans can kill their Sundays watching pro football, but Norway's broadcaster, NRK, plans to program 100 hours of chess. The airtime will focus on a young Norwegian player's quest to become world champion. It will also make a statement about television. The broadcaster says it's pioneering what it calls Slow TV. A previous effort at Slow TV featured 12 hours of non-stop knitting.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR News Investigations
3:03 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Secret Persuasion: How Big Campaign Donors Stay Anonymous

A composite image shows part of the NPR/Center for Responsive Politics reporting team's whiteboard at NPR headquarters that was used to map out how Wellspring connects to other social welfare groups. (Click the enlarge button to see a full-size image.)
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 2:48 pm

Part two of our "Secret Persuasion" story reported with the Center for Responsive Politics. Read the first part here.

As tax-exempt organizations become a vehicle of choice for big political donors, one powerful appeal is the anonymity. Federal laws allow tax-exempt groups — unlike political committees — to withhold their donor lists from disclosure.

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