Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00AM-9:00AM
Renee Montagne, Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Genre: 

Pages

1:40am

Mon August 26, 2013
The March On Washington At 50

Two Officers, Black And White, On Walking The '63 March Beat

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 7:58 am

Joseph Burden (third row, third from right) with his graduating class at Washington, D.C.'s Metropolitan Police Department training academy in 1960. Every officer on the force was required to work the day of the March on Washington.
Courtesy of Joseph Burden

For the month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream Speech" Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capital from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

Read more

12:53am

Mon August 26, 2013
The Two-Way

Pain, Loss And Tears Come With Medal Of Honor

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 2:04 pm

U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Ty Michael Carter near Dahla Dam, Afghanistan in July 2012.
Ho/AFP/Getty Images

Update at 3:14 p.m. ET. Carter Receives Medal Of Honor:

Saying he represented "the essence of true heroism," President Obama presented Army Staff Sgt. Ty Michael Carter with the nation's highest military honors, this afternoon.

"As these soldiers and families will tell you, they're a family forged in battle, and loss, and love," Obama said, according to the AP.

Our Original Post Continues:

The Army staff sergeant who Monday afternoon will receive the Medal of Honor at a White House ceremony has mixed emotions.

Read more

7:47am

Fri August 23, 2013
Business

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer To Retire Within A Year

The company said Friday that Ballmer will stay on until his successor is found. He has been with the company for more than 30 years, and became CEO in 2000.

6:48am

Fri August 23, 2013
The Salt

Julia Child Was Wrong: Don't Wash Your Raw Chicken, Folks

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 7:52 am

The French Chef in which she teaches us how to roast a bird." href="/post/julia-child-was-wrong-dont-wash-your-raw-chicken-folks" class="noexit lightbox">
Julia Child poses with "the chicken sisters" before an episode of The French Chef in which she teaches us how to roast a bird.
Courtesy of Paul Child/PBS

4:58am

Fri August 23, 2013
Animals

Latest Nasdaq Glitch Was Not Squirrel Related

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 5:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE: Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The NASDAQ says it was a software glitch that froze its trading worldwide for hours yesterday. So this time it wasn't the squirrel. The bushy-tailed rodents have halted the flow of capitalism before. In 1987 and again in 1994, squirrels chewed through a key NASDAQ computer cable. Not saying, but cables still exist in the NASDAQ's high tech world so it seems squirrels could strike again. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Pages