Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00AM-9:00AM
Renee Montagne, Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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3:17am

Tue August 13, 2013
Law

Holder Unveils New Approach To Criminal Justice

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And the Obama administration is trying to reduce prison time for some people convicted of less serious crimes. Attorney General Eric Holder outlined a new approach to criminal justice yesterday in a speech to the American Bar Association in San Francisco. He's targeting what he says is expensive and racially biased overcrowding in American prisons.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

ATTORNEY GENERAL ERIC HOLDER: Too many Americans go to too many prisons, for far too long, and for no truly good law enforcement reason.

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3:17am

Tue August 13, 2013
Law

'Whitey' Bulger Found Guilty of Murder, Racketeering

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. James "Whitey" Bulger - the mobster who once reigned over Boston's underworld - was found guilty yesterday on 31 of 32 counts in a federal racketeering indictment. The laundry list of allegations against him included murder, extortion and illegal gun possession. The verdict came after a 20-year quest to bring the gangster to justice. From member station WBUR in Boston, Asma Khalid reports.

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2:07am

Tue August 13, 2013
Shots - Health News

Obamacare: People With Disabilities Face Complex Choices

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:59 am

Speech-language pathologists Jill Tullman (left) and Mendi Carroll (right) work with Bryce Vernon at Talking with Technology Camp in Empire, Colo., on July 25.
Kristen Kidd KCFR News

The Affordable Care Act has set new standards — called essential health benefits — outlining what health insurance companies must now cover. But there's a catch: Insurance firms can still pick and choose, to some degree, which specific therapies they'll cover within some categories of benefit.

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1:03am

Tue August 13, 2013
All Tech Considered

A Closer Look At Elon Musk's Much-Hyped Hyperloop

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:59 am

A rendering of a Hyperloop pod.
Courtesy of Elon Musk

You can thank brainy billionaire Elon Musk's Hyperloop proposal for bringing electro-magnetic-powered transportation and the linear induction motor back into the public consciousness.

The Hyperloop is a system for really-really rapid transit. If built, Musk claims it can carry people about 800 miles per hour, which could get you from Los Angeles to San Francisco in about 30 minutes.

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1:02am

Tue August 13, 2013
The Salt

Colorado Vault Is Fort Knox For The World's Seeds

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 5:59 am

Dave Dierig, research leader at the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation, stands among the ceiling-high shelves that hold the 600,000 seed packets in this cold storage vault.
Grace Hood KUNC

When unapproved genetically modified wheat was found growing in Oregon earlier this year, it didn't take long for accusations to start flying. A flurry of initial finger-pointing cast potential blame on a federal seed vault in Fort Collins, Colo., which housed the same strain of wheat, developed by Monsanto Corp., for about seven years up until late 2011.

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