Mountain Edition

Thursdays at 3:30pm

Mountain Edition is Aspen Public Radio's weekly newsmagazine. The weekly, thirty-minute show airs Thurdays at 3:30pm just before NPR's All Things Considered. The show focuses on news, analysis, and commentary about Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley. Each week the Aspen Public Radio news department will examine the most significant issues and events affecting us in the Valley. The program will include news stories and features reported by APR reporters and contributors. The show will present moderated analysis of the news from guests and regular segments focused on the arts, music, and profiles of people and events of interest to residents of the Roaring Fork Valley.

Governor Hickenlooper says Colorado dealt with a lot in 2013 including massive fires and biblical floods. He delivered his State of the State address today.

Aspen saw its first plane crash in more than 20 years earlier this week. One died, two were injured and there were a lot of witnesses.

We talk with an expert who explains which pilots get extra training for flying into Aspen’s tricky airport.

We get the latest on efforts to grow and sell recreational pot in the Upper Valley.

Aspen is trying to alert residents and businesses about two big X Games concerts later this month.

And, we’ll hear just how easy it is to break the city’s noise ordinance.

Finally, there’s sobering news about what happens when big mountain skiing and snowboarding go terribly wrong. Our latest Road to Sochi looks at the documentary The Crash Reel.

Colorado made history this week when retail marijuana stores around the state opened for business. People traveled across the country to stand in line at several Denver-area businesses.

Here in the Roaring Fork Valley, retail pot shops will open later this year. In the meantime, law enforcement is getting ready.

Aspen resident and Nordic skier Simi Hamilton also made history-- but in a totally different field. He’s the first American male to win a World Cup stage race. The win gets him closer to the Olympics.

Paying for health insurance is really expensive in the Roaring Fork Valley compared to most other places in Colorado. Now, Governor Hickenlooper says he may get involved in lowering premiums.

Garfield County believes the state did a bad job setting up the prices for those premiums. But some experts say insurance officials didn’t break the rules. We’ll hear from one expert who’s asking why medical care is so high in the Valley and other resort communities.

Finally, sometimes the the road to Sochi is especially difficult. Ski racer Wiley Maple’s efforts were cut short after an old injury flared up.

Today we hear from Aspen Mayor Steve Skadron about his vision for the resort town in the coming year. Then we dig through the Aspen Public Radio archives and listen to some of this year’s most interesting and thought-provoking local stories. One Glenwood Springs woman was caught in a dangerous financial trap. And, her problem is somewhat common in Colorado’s immigrant community. As habitat for the Greater Sage Grouse disappears across the West, federal officials are deciding how strong protections should be on some Colorado land. Local stakeholders are watching closely. And a snowboarding veteran is battling a major injury with the Olympic Games a little more than a month away.

Congressman Scott Tipton looks back on 2013 and the legislation he supported. Our Roger Adams also asks him about 2014 - when campaigning goes into full swing for the next election.

Also today, figure skater Jeremy Abbott wants 2014 to be his Olympic year. He’s focusing his sights on Sochi. And, we caught up with where it all started: the Aspen Ice Garden.

Mountain Edition - December 12th, 2013

Dec 12, 2013

Seatbelts could have prevented some major injuries in a bus rollover that happened in October. That’s when A RFTA bus crashed near Carbondale.

The Pitkin County Jail is working on a set of policies for sexual assault. It’ll serve as a model for rural jails across Colorado.

Turns out, the higher you go in elevation...the bigger your brain gets. This brain swelling may be keeping high school athletes safer.

One of the largest citizen science efforts in the world kicks off on Sunday. The annual Christmas bird count includes volunteers in the Roaring Fork Valley.

And, Aspen’s Olympic history stretches way back. It begins when the first ski runs were being cut on Aspen the 1930’s. We’ll have more in the Road to Sochi.

A whopper of a snowstorm dumped more than a foot of white gold along the Roaring Fork Valley.

The Town of Basalt is facing angry residents who don’t want to be forced out of their homes.

South of Carbondale, citizen scientists are using backpacks to get more data on air pollution

And other residents there are grappling with more layoffs at the Elk Creek coal mine. It’s been all but closed up.

A New Castle native is hoping to overcome a big injury and make it to the Winter Olympics.

And we’ll hear from a seasoned athlete about what it’s like to compete in the Olympics and take home a medal.

Federal agents on the Front Range today are raiding medical marijuana dispensaries and grow operations with the help of local authorities. We’ll have the latest.

A new method for handling criminals is ramping up in Pitkin County. Instead of incarceration, a new wellness program is being tried for people who fit the bill.

As the Greater Sage Grouse’s habitat disappears across the West, federal officials are deciding how strongly to protect some of its Colorado habitat. Local stakeholders are watching closely.

College students around the country are getting an inside glimpse into the social workings of the Roaring Fork Valley...through a book called “The Slums of Aspen.”

A Wall Street Journal reporter explores the early movers and shakers in developing fracking - one of them is a former Aspen resident.

Finally, the fastest distance Nordic skier in the U-S grew up in Aspen. We profile Noah Hoffman in the Road to Sochi series.

Mountain Edition - November 14th, 2013

Nov 14, 2013

Energy planners gathered in Carbondale this week to compare notes and strategize about funding.

The Town of Basalt approves a home for senior citizens. Now, there’s an effort underway to recruit residents.

Snowmass Village takes a stab at cutting greenhouse gas emissions. The town has some of the highest per capita in the nation.

An independent study finds the Roaring Fork Valley’s mass transit system means big savings for residents.

We find out whether Lance Armstrong had anything to do with death threats against the national agency to prevent doping.

We’ll wrap up with the latest from our Road to Sochi series. Olympic hopeful Meg Olenick aims to be one of the first compete in a sport new to the winter games.

Mountain Edition - November 7th, 2013

Nov 7, 2013

On Tuesday, most voters said “no” to big tax increases locally and statewide. A CSU political science professor says anti-tax activists are growing in their influence.

One measure that did pass taxes retail marijuana to raise money for schools. As pot becomes more available in the state, one youth non-profit is worried.

A warming climate is changing ecosystems in the Roaring Fork Valley and one local government is using open spaces to gather data on what’s happening.

A new art display at the Wyly Art Center in Basalt features the work of a self-taught painter.  Despite being silenced by Alzheimer’s, Winifred Wyman is speaking through paint.

Also today on the Road to Sochi, Aspen native Simi Hamilton works to make the 2014 winter Olympic team. The Nordic ski racer specializes in sprinting.

That’s coming up on Mountain Edition.

A weekend RFTA bus rollover that injured 11 people is under investigation. We have the latest.

The fire district that serves Carbondale is asking voters for a tax increase. The chief says it’s needed to fight increasingly intense fires. Opponents say it costs too much.

Snowmass Village voters have a different tax question. It would pay for improvements to aging infrastructure like leaks and cracks in sewer pipes.

A Mid-Valley non-profit is concerned about the health of the Fryingpan River. Flows were down over the summer… thanks to the drought last winter... and a study will determine how that affected fish.

The Aspen Skiing Company is recognized with an award for commitment to the arts. Aspen Public Radio’s Roger Adams talks to the Ski-Co’s Managing Partners, Jim and Paula Crown.

Finally, an Aspen ski jumper is hoping to make the Olympic team in the Nordic combined. We profile Michael Ward in the latest Road to Sochi segment.