Non-Profit in the Spotlight

Every month, Aspen Public Radio picks a non-profit in the Roaring Fork Valley that is focused on service and improving the community for all. Each week, you'll hear a different aspect of our Non-Profit in the Spotlight as they explain their mission, challenges, and successes.

President of the board of directors for Aspen Community Theatre, Lynette Schlepp, says that ACT's shows are there to lighten things up when there's a lot going on in the world. Monty Python's Spamalot is a big undertaking, especially when it comes to the set. 

Producer Rita Hunter says that because there is a limited amount of people in the valley that have theatre experience, there is a lot of sharing and collaborating. This is ACT's 41st year, and November's production will be there 75th show.

Aspen Community Theatre was founded in 1976. They put on one musical each year at the District Theatre in the Aspen Elementary School. This year's production opens on November 3rd. 

District Manager of our local chapter, Jonathan Gorst, says the importance of keeping the younger generation in our valley and how important that is for our future economy. They encourage the community to reach out to them directly.

According to their website, Junior Achievement has contributed to the economics and business education of young people throughout the world. They say their unique system provides the training, materials, and support necessary to bolster the chances for student success.

Junior Achievement of the Roaring Fork Valley does not receive any funding from the National umbrella. All chapters function independently. Junior Achievement emphasizes the importance of their volunteers. 

Junior Achievement of the Roaring Fork Valley's purpose is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy. They believe that they are creating business leaders of the future.

Habitat for Humanity Roaring Fork Valley has always been aware of the evolving affordable housing issues in our valley. The look forward to the proposed 27 condominium project on the hillside behind Basalt High School.

Habitat for Humanity employees understand and see the hardships of living in the valley when it comes to affordable housing. They encourage the community to do more than simply "talk" about the problem. 

Habitat for Humanity, Roaring Fork Valley's mission states that they "provide a hand up, not a hand out" through their home ownership opportunities. Every home that Habitat builds is purchased by the selected family partners; the homes are not given away.

In 1999, the local chapter of Habitat International was formed in the Roaring Fork Valley. The founders of our local chapter had great instincts, and foresaw what would become one of the biggest issues in the valley- the need for affordable housing. 

According to A Way Out, in 2016 the surgeon general said that 1 in 7 Americans will confront a substance abuse addiction. A client of A Way Out shares his experiences.

A Way Out sees a rise in both mental illness and substance abuse. They provide support throughout a person's entire recovery process. A client of A Way Out, shares his powerful story.

A Way Out gives community members an opportunity to get help with their addictions. Addiction impacts more than just the addicted, and A Way Out provides a comprehensive family program.

A Way Out's mission is to support people in drug and alcohol crisis with the treatment they need. Since Aspen is a resort destination, the issues of how substance abuse negatively impacts someone's life are kept out of the public eye. 

CORE would like to expand their outreach into even more communities. CORE keeps their eye on a national level, yet focuses on local and state levels to do what they can. CORE started collecting energy wasting "True Confessions" from the public.

CORE encourages valley residents to know that they can make their homes or apartments safer and more efficient. CORE emphasizes that it's important for building codes to be responsive to today's needs of reducing green house gas emissions.

CORE collaborates with local towns to adopt new building codes and energy efficient programs. Along with the City of Aspen, CORE created a new social movement called "The High-Five". They hope to inspire the community to start saving or to increase the amount of energy they are already saving.

CORE was founded in 1994, when the awareness of climate change shed light on how the Roaring Fork Valley's economy is dependent on a good, clean environment. Energy consumption is universal. CORE says that saving energy helps to protect our environment and our economy. 

Spring Board Aspen is looking to expand both their membership and outreach. They want the community to know that students pursuing college who are experiencing financial barriers as well as potential members can have access to them. Spring Board Aspen encourages those interested to be proactive and reach out to them. 

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