Spotlight Health 2015

Spotlight Health is a series of programs created by Aspen Public Radio highlighting key people and topics during a special section of this year’s Aspen Ideas Festival.  The programs present many of the speakers and leaders from around the world working on cutting-edge health issues.

This program is supported by The Anschutz Medical Campus. This June, The Anschutz Medical Campus and 300 other health and health care leaders will be featured at Spotlight: Health at the Aspen Institute. More information about how The Anschutz Campus is pioneering the way medical discoveries, teaching and practices work together, can be found at thefrontierofwhatsnext.com

In the fourth episode of our spring series on critical health issues, host Elise Thatcher talks with two guests about the value of truly being yourself, even when it’s challenging or dangerous.

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Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the final episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll hear about something called Doctor in a Box.

“It’s telemedicine that you can have in the privacy of your own home, or you can actually take the kit with you while you’re traveling and have consistent access to health care.”

The idea comes from a firm who also came up with a bike you probably saw on facebook or twitter last year. Yes, we’ll hear where the Denny Bike is now.

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Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the fifth episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today, we sit down with a recently retired FDA commissioner.

As part of her tenure, Dr. Margaret Hamburg focused on how the U.S. can make sure food and medicine coming from other countries is safe.

Later in the program we’ll hear the argument in favor of hospital mergers and some of the results from one in New York City.

That’s coming up, here on Spotlight Health.

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Good afternoon you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the fourth episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll hear from a health expert who noticed patients spend a lot of time in hospitals without much to do and how that changes when there is art and music in the building.

“I witnessed moments where patients would listen to the concert, and that could be the last beautiful thing they’ve heard.”

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Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the third episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we hear from the doctor who keeps an eye on infectious diseases for the National Institutes of Health. With the measles outbreak in December, he’s tackling the vaccine controversy head on by getting the word out to parents who have not already vaccinated their kids.

“I would try and convince them by, first of all, not attacking them.”

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Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio.

This is the second episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today, we’ll find out what living longer can mean both emotionally and logistically.

“I ask people on a regular basis, if you have an extra 30 years, where would you put them. And no one has ever said, ‘I’d want to make old age longer.’ ”

We’ll also hear about one way of becoming younger by using blood. That’s right, blood.

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This is Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio.

This is the first episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll check in with the world of prosthetics and light therapy, and how medical technology is changing.

We’ll also examine why healthcare is so expensive in the United States, even though the quality of care isn’t always that great.

That’s this hour on Spotlight Health.

Guests: Krista Donaldson, CEO D-Rev & Elizabeth Bradley, Director of the Yale Global Health Initiative.

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Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio.

This is our final episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll hear about a program to get more humanities students to become doctors, even if they major in, say philosophy.

“And then come to medical school without having had to take many of the traditional science requirements, and without having to take the MCAT.”

That’s the Medical College Admission Test, for all of you who’ve avoided the rigors usually required to become a doctor.

And those more well-rounded physicians could end up working in what Doctor Kenneth Davis calls the hospital of the future

“The providers of health care have no choice but to change. What we have to ask ourselves is with those changes, will we be improving access, and will we be improving quality.”

That’s this hour, on Spotlight Health.

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Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio. This is the fifth episode in our series on key health issues.

Today we’ll hear about ways technology is making it easier for people to live their lives. That includes prosthetics and robotics. Think of one of those really cool science terms you learned back in grade school or middle school. Exosekelton! A Roaring Fork Valley resident is using one to start moving again.

And the ever expanding field of 3-D printing could make that even more effective.

That’s this hour on Spotlight Health.

Amanda Boxtel, Bridging Bionics Foundation

Many people already use prosthetics to get around; now robotics is becoming another way to help people move. It’s already the case for a Basalt resident, Amanda Boxtel, who’s been paralyzed below her pelvis for decades. Boxtel is Executive Director of the Bridging Bionics Foundation. She says it’s been important to her to aim for the best quality of life possible. She talks with APR’s Elise Thatcher.

ted.com

Living with a missing limb is difficult, especially if keeps someone from working or taking care of their family. Krista Donaldson is CEO of D-Rev, a nonprofit that designs technology to help with certain problems in developing countries. Donaldson is working on a prosthetic knee that’s affordable and reliable. 

Stanford University School of Medicine

Research around mouse blood has been making the rounds in the news media lately. It even got a moment on NPR’s Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me earlier this month. Scientist and neurology professor Tom Rando is a key player in that research. He’s Director of the Glenn Laboratories for the Biology of Aging at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Rando spoke with APR’s Elise Thatcher, and says the blood research has taken nearly a decade.

Aspen Institute

There’s a big push to get kids more physically active, but some kids are already playing sports regularly-- maybe even too often. As part of our spring series on key health issues, Tom Farrey talks with APR’s Elise Thatcher. He writes for ESPN and directs the Sports and Society program at the Aspen Institute. Farrey says there’s growing concern about kids overdoing it.

APR Special: Spotlight Health, Show #4

May 27, 2014
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Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio.

I’m Elise Thatcher, and this is the fourth in our series on critical health issues.

We’re going to explore the state of health and sports these days especially kids’ athletics.

“We put kids in uniform at age three, we got adults screaming on the sidelines at age six, and we create the travel teams at seven and eight…”

We’ll also get the details on research about staying young… using younger blood. You may have already heard about it.

“This research, may suggest that Bram Stoker had ideas ahead of his time.

That was a medical professor named Andrew Randall commenting on the shocking news on what may make us all live forever. Drinking blood?

It doesn’t actually involve children’s blood… but we’ll let our guest explain.

That’s this hour on Spotlight Health.

Brent James/ Institute for Health Care Delivery Research

The Affordable Care Act has changed a lot for doctors and other medical professionals. There are new insurance requirements, potentially lots more patients and the logistics of switching to digital medical records. Doctor Brent James is right in the middle of all of this, fine tuning the answer to an age old problem: how do you take care of patients in a way that’s really effective, but not overwhelmingly expensive? Dr. James is Executive Director of the Institute for Health Care Delivery Research in Salt Lake City. As part of our spring series on key health issues, James talks with APR’s Elise Thatcher.

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Good afternoon, this is Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio. This is the third of six episodes in our series on key health issues.

Today we’ll untangle why seeing a doctor can be so confusing...

“Despite all the medical advances, there seems to be increasing controversy about what is the right thing to do, even about your most common conditions.”

We’ll hear one solution for making that whole treatment experience cheaper and more effective, too.

“We estimate that we’re taking at least $400 million per year out of Intermountain’s cost of operation, through better care.

Coming up today on Spotlight Health.

Episode 3 of 6 in a series to explore key health issues with guests also participating in the Aspen Ideas Festival Spotlight: Health programming this summer.

Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer

Deciding between doctors, treatments, and, surgeries can be exhausting, and often especially hard when juggling a serious diagnosis. Boston Physician Pamela Hartzband noticed this after practicing medicine for years, and she and a colleague have written a book on how to navigate those decisions. It’s called Your Medical Mind: How to Decide What Is Right for You. Dr. Hartzband will speak at the Aspen Ideas Festival this summer. As part of our spring series on key health issues, Dr. Hartzband spoke with APR’s Elise Thatcher. 

CeDAR/University of Colorado Hospital

Treating drug addictions can be gender specific, and that's part of the therapy at the Center for Dependency, Addiction, and Rehabilitation at the University of Colorado Hospital in Denver. Ben Cort represents the Center, and sat down with APR’s Elise Thatcher. 

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Good afternoon, this is Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio. I’m Elise Thatcher, and this is the second episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll find out how gender plays a role in treating drug addicts…our guest has personal experience with tackling inner demons.

“At 26 was a director at an S & P five firm, but I’d never done anything with my recovery, that was separate.”

We’ll also hear from a former Pepsi Executive about why he believes we should feel empowered to choose exercise or fresh fruit over other unhealthy foods and behaviors.

“What I learned in the food industry, is that many of those tobacco prescriptions don’t apply as easily to food.”

That’s coming up... on Spotlight Health.

Episode 2 of 6 in a series to explore key health issues, with guests also participating in the Aspen Ideas Festival Spotlight: Health programming this summer.

Chicago Tribune

For many people, changing bad habits can be incredibly difficult. But it’s those personal choices that can take us from being in decent health… to feeling miserable. As part of our spring series on key health issues, APR’s Elise Thatcher talks with Derek Yach, Senior Vice President of the Vitality Institute, a New York think tank. 

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