KAJX

Affordable Housing

  This week:  It’s all about housing…A Valley Round Up special in depth look into one of the valley’s most talked about issues. Joining host Alycin Bektesh are Bill Stirling, whose recent op ed in the Aspen Times and the Aspen Daily News addressed this issue head-on. Bill served four consecutive terms as mayor of Aspen from 1983 until 1991, as well as Curtis Wackerle, Editor of the Aspen Daily News.

This week on Valley Roundup, a prominent developer is getting out his wallet, Snowmass Village is moving forward with a new shopping center, where does co-housing fit in the affordable-housing discussion? And will a valley lawsuit create precedent in Colorado’s judicial system?

Elise Thatcher

  Aspen councilmember Adam Frisch expressed concern about the Aspen Pitkin Housing authority Monday night. He gained support from his fellow council members in suggesting a work session to address the way the authority is governed.

This week, host Alycin Bektesh is joined in the studio by Aspen Times reporter Rick Carroll and Aspen Public Radio’s Wyatt Orme. She also checks in with Aspen Daily News Columnist Mick Ireland.

Claire Woodcock / Aspen Public Radio

Live from the Belly Up, moderator Alycin Bektesh leads a panel to discuss the question, “What Can Cities and Towns Do To Address The Affordable Housing Crisis?”

The panel features Aspen mayor Steve Skadron and assistant city manager Barry Crook, and Snowmass Village mayor Markey Butler and town manager Clint Kinney.

Craig Turpin / Aspen Daily News

Aspen Public Radio hosts the second in a series of Town Halls on housing in the valley Wednesday night.

 

Ahead of that, we’ve heard from valley residents about their own living experiences, concerns, and hopes for the future of affordable housing.

Reporter Alycin Bektesh speaks with host Elizabeth Stewart-Severy about the employee housing system in Snowmass Village.

Host Alycin Bektesh is joined by Christine Benedetti, editor of Aspen Magazine, Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, and Auden Schendler, author of Getting Green Done. His article How to fix the mountain town housing crisis was recently published in Outside Magazine.

David Johnston Architects

 Last month Aspen City Council voted 3-2 to approve an affordable housing unit on Castle Creek road, near the Marolt housing complex.

Aspen City Council is scheduled to discuss two new affordable housing developments Monday. Both require higher density zoning than their neighborhoods currently allow.

Glenwood Springs Post Independent

Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Springs Post Independent, is joining the Detroit Free Press early next month.

Next Generation Advisory Commission is under fire after suggesting trade-downs as a way of opening up employee housing units.

Theodore K Guy Associates PC

 

Aspen’s Truscott II affordable rental buildings were built through a partnership with the the Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority (APCHA) and private partners. The contracts expire this year, which leaves room for new opportunities.

courtesy photo

  This summer, the Aspen Skiing Company is partnering with two University of Colorado at Boulder graduate students to study housing in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Habitat for Humanity Roaring Fork Valley has always been aware of the evolving affordable housing issues in our valley. The look forward to the proposed 27 condominium project on the hillside behind Basalt High School.

Habitat for Humanity employees understand and see the hardships of living in the valley when it comes to affordable housing. They encourage the community to do more than simply "talk" about the problem. 

In 1999, the local chapter of Habitat International was formed in the Roaring Fork Valley. The founders of our local chapter had great instincts, and foresaw what would become one of the biggest issues in the valley- the need for affordable housing. 

New guidelines have been approved regarding asset caps for those applying for Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority residences.

The Aspen City Council discussed building three new affordable apartment complexes during their work session this week. The conversation lasted three hours and touched on the differing interests involved.

Currently, there are a handful of proposed developments in the Basalt area. The mid-valley is a desirable place to live, and the demand for housing has sparked fierce debates. Aspen Public Radio’s Wyatt Orme recently attended a meeting for The Tree Farm development, which is currently under review by Eagle County. He discussed the meeting, along the broader context of increased housing and business development in the mid-valley, with producer Christin Kay.

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