Affordable Housing

Elise Thatcher

  Basalt officials are considering whether to support a bond measure by the Roaring Fork School District. On Tuesday night, Town Council will discuss the $122 million bond measure that goes before voters this fall. If approved, the measure would mean money for, among other things, the District to buy or build affordable housing for its workers.

apcha.org

Aspen’s workforce housing program is collecting data from residents as part of an update to its guidelines. 

The Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority started disseminating surveys to workers early in July. So far, 665 people have filled them out. The survey asks about income, your profession and whether you live in workforce housing.

Right now, policy decisions are being made with old data, says Housing Authority director Mike Kosdrosky. The new information will provide a clearer picture of what’s needed.

aspenk12.net

The Aspen School District is hoping a change to its affordable housing rules will attract and retain more employees. Starting in August, school staff living in district rentals will only be allowed to live there five years. The school’s Employee Transitional Housing Program includes 43 units, mostly in Woody Creek and Snowmass Village.

The goal, says school superintendent John Maloy, is to provide more room for newly hired staff. He says last year, there was just one unit open for 27 new employees.

Jon Fredericks/LANDWEST

The Roaring Fork Valley Regional Planning Commission will review a proposed housing development in El Jebel today. It’s a project that could bring needed affordable homes to an area seeing barely any inventory and skyrocketing prices. Aspen Public Radio's Elise Thatcher continues our series on the housing shortage today with an exploration of new proposed developments, and some already in the works.

Elise Thatcher

Officials in the midvalley are trying to find a way to join forces on two big issues: childcare and affordable housing. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher was at an unusual collaborative meeting last night and has this report.     

Mountain Edition - May 21st, 2015

May 21, 2015

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Aspen’s second lifeline to the world is up and running again, as Independence Pass reopens.

A judge dismisses a case against an elderly Carbondale driver who killed a Basalt motorcyclist.

Two Aspen City Council candidates carefully duke it out on the Aspen Public Radio airwaves.

Turns out, you cannot buy exclusive access to your condo building, especially if you share the building with affordable housing residents.

Childcare in the Roaring Fork Valley is getting harder to find.

Elise Thatcher

The rental housing shortage in the mid Roaring Fork Valley is ratcheting up. As Aspen Public Radio has reported, rapidly increasing prices and restrictions are having a significant impact on residents. In our second story in our series, Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher takes a look at the subsidized housing options in the Mid-Valley.

Mountain Edition - May 14th, 2015

May 14, 2015

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

The embattled principal of Aspen High School announces her resignation.

A tax in Aspen is generating an extra $2 million annually. The public is getting a chance to decide how to spend it.

Finding affordable housing is always a challenge, but right now, Mid-Valley residents are facing significant hurdles.

A mentoring organization is seeking men, especially in Basalt and Carbondale.

And, a Carbondale resident is in the middle of Nepal’s aid effort. We talk to him about the latest earthquake to hit the area.

Grayson Schaffer

Glenwood Springs is a contender for being one of Outside magazine’s best towns. Such listings can be music to the ears of town promoters, but can also increase the demand for local resources, like housing. As Aspen Public Radio is reporting this month, the lack of rental housing in the Roaring Fork Valley is having a significant effect on locals. Jonah Ogles is Senior Editor with Outside Magazine, and talks with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher. He says Outside often gets criticism for listing communities as desirable.

Joleen Cohen

Finding decent housing in Aspen and parts of the Roaring Fork Valley has always been difficult. But the increasing shortage in rentals, especially in the Mid-Valley, is having a significant impact on residents. In the first in our series about housing in the Valley, Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has this story.

http://www.weymouth.ma.us/

Questions have been raised about Aspen’s affordable housing authority. Aspen Public Radio spoke with legal experts about whether it could be vulnerable to lawsuits. They say probably not, contradicting APCHA’s former director.

Elise Thatcher

Earlier this week Aspen City Council approved paying for a consulting company to gather data, pinpoint the goals of the housing program, and recommend  improvements to the guidelines. The analysis begins next week. One area that will be reviewed closely is the qualification requirements for someone who wants to live in Aspen’s affordable housing program.

  There’s more information now about a recently released document concerning Aspen’s affordable housing program. It’s come to light that the Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority has lost much of its power to the Aspen City Manager’s office.

Aspen mayoral race: Torre

Apr 27, 2015
Roger Adams

The race for mayor in Aspen has become more heated as election day gets closer. Two people are running for the seat. Ballots will be counted May 5th. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen sat down with candidate Torre.

Torre isn’t a newcomer to city politics. He served eight years on council. This is his fifth attempt to become mayor. The tennis instructor has lived in town for two decades and says he’s running because he feels the public’s voice has been lost.

Squirm Night gets Squirmy at Aspen City Hall

Apr 17, 2015
Grassroots TV

The candidates running for Aspen City Council and mayor were grilled Thursday night at the annual Squirm Night forum. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Affordable housing, development and the residency of one candidate came up during the two hour forum in council chambers. Editors from local newspapers grilled the seven people running for two open seats on council.

One question asked the candidates to grade the City Manager’s Office. Retired affordable housing director Tom McCabe and former mayor Mick Ireland:

Elise Thatcher

Officials say there's nothing illegal going on with how a local affordable housing program is being governed. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher was at last night’s Aspen/Pitkin County Housing Authority meeting and has this story, and a full copy of the memo.

Courtesy Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority

The legal status of Aspen's local housing authority is in question and its board of directors will discuss the problem tonight. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

A 2012 memo from a Denver attorney says the Aspen/Pitkin County Housing Authority has been stripped, over time, of its policy-making functions, so that its board doesn’t have the power it’s supposed to have under state laws. Instead, the city manager’s office controls the housing agency.

Aspen City Council race: Keith Goode

Apr 6, 2015
Facebook/Keith Goode

 

Next week ballots go in the mail for Aspen’s municipal election. Voters will choose from a large pool of candidates to fill two open seats on city council. Keith Goode is one of seven people running. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

"Reporter: Why are you running for city council?"

 

Goode: "I’ve been on the Planning and Zoning Board for the last four years and I really have enjoyed my time there. But, the main reason is when I hear people say ‘Aspen’s losing its character,’ I don’t buy that."

Mountain Edition - April 2nd, 2015

Apr 2, 2015

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

The top official for the U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs visits disabled vets in Snowmass.

The former owner of an embattled dog sledding operation appears in court.

And, it’s fire season in Colorado. Local firefighters are preparing at specific locations.

Potholes are forming on local streets. We’ll tell you why the deep caverns are particularly pronounced in the high country.

State lawmakers spend nine hours debating the budget.

Aspen City Council is considering eliminating a longtime housing option for local workers. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

It’s called the “Accessory Dwelling Unit” program and it’s been around for decades. The idea was that wealthy homeowners would offset their development impacts by building a separate dwelling unit from the main house so a local worker could live there. But it’s a voluntary program and many of them remain empty. At Tuesday’s work session, City Councilman Adam Frisch told his colleagues that the program should be eliminated.

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