agriculture

Your Evening News - December 2nd, 2014

Dec 2, 2014

Glassier Open Space Comment Deadline Approaches

The deadline is looming to comment on a management plan for a new open space parcel in the mid-valley. The Glassier open space near Emma will be used for recreation and agriculture.

Unlike most Pitkin County-managed open space parcels, the Glassier land will give agricultural producers a chance to grow crops. About half of the 282-acre land is irrigated and at one time, was used for ranching.

Suzanne Stephens is the Associate Director of Aspen Valley Land Trust. She works with landowners to conserve open lands and working ranches in the Roaring Fork and Colorado River Valleys. Martha Cochran, Executive Director of AVLT, also contributes to the conservation. We talk about water conservation, land conservation, and why it is important today and tomorrow.   

Learn more about Aspen Valley Land Trust and the properties they protect: www.avlt.org.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

So far it looks like the Roaring Fork Valley is holding off a nasty virus that’s raising concerns in Denver. 

Bears are causing some problems, we hear what police in Basalt are doing about it.

One of the visible leftover structures from the recession in the Upper Valley may disappear later this year.

And more people are showing interest in farming Pitkin county open space land.

Climate change reports are frequent-- we check on one about water in the Valley.

We’ll get the details on how Aspen’s airport could get quieter and say “goodbye” to long time airport director Jim Elwood.

Marci Krivonen

Interest is growing in farming Pitkin County’s agricultural lands. The county manages about 250 acres that are either already leased or will become available to agricultural producers later this year. The land is desirable because it’s cheap. Often the cost of farming and ranching in Pitkin County keeps would-be agricultural producers from jumping into the industry. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Colorado River Water Conservation District

The public is weighing in how to solve the problem of less water in the future. People offered suggestions for Governor Hickenlooper’s Colorado Water Plan at a town hall meeting in Aspen Thursday. A growing population and climate change are straining the resource in Colorado, and an enormous water gap is projected, between how much water Colorado has and how much it needs. The Water Plan will use information collected by nine basin roundtables organized around various watersheds. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Jim Pokrandt.