Amendment 64

Marci Krivonen

A laboratory that tests retail marijuana is opening in Carbondale. It’s one of just two such Colorado labs west of the Continental Divide. The scientists who run GreenHill Laboratories say they will be testing for potency and they’ll be one of the first to test for contaminants. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Inside Greenhill Laboratories in Carbondale, Lab Owner Hilary Glass motions toward her equipment.

Glass: "These are my incubators. I need about eight more."

Marci Krivonen

Governor John Hickenlooper says when it comes to legal marijuana, the future is still somewhat hazy in Colorado. Recreational pot became legal last year and retailers started selling it in January. Hickenlooper looked back yesterday on how the process has gone so far, in a talk at the Aspen Ideas Festival. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Marci Krivonen

Some of the heavy hitters in the marijuana community celebrated its legalization in Colorado at an event near Woody Creek. The group NORML, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, held a cookout over the weekend at Owl Farm, Hunter S. Thompson’s old homestead. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen was there and filed this report.

Marci Krivonen

When recreational marijuana goes on sale for adults age 21 and older next year, the most expensive buds in the Roaring Fork Valley will likely be in Carbondale. Voters there passed a 5 percent tax on both retail and wholesale pot this month. And, new statewide taxes will increase the price even more. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, some Carbondale marijuana businesses are preparing for higher-priced pot.

Marci Krivonen

Voters in Colorado passed new taxes on retail marijuana that will help pay for fixes to school buildings in disrepair. Proposition AA establishes excise and sales taxes on recreational pot that’s allowed to be sold to adults 21 and older. Besides raising money for schools, the taxes will also fund regulation of the new retail industry.

Flickr/Dave H

The federal government yesterday (Thurs., 8-29-13) said it won’t sue to stop recreational marijuana use in Colorado and Washington. The news comes a little over a week after Garfield County commissioners voted to ban recreational marijuana businesses in certain areas of the county. Aspen Public Radio’s Rebecca Kruth spoke to one of the commissioners who voted in favor of the ban and filed this report.  

Garfield County Commissioner John Martin says the federal government’s latest stance on recreational marijuana has left him feeling somewhat confused.

Marci Krivonen

This fall voters across Colorado will decide how recreational marijuana should be taxed. The state legislature referred a special sales tax and an excise tax to the ballot. As Bente Birkeland reports, while the initiative has broad support, there are some who worry it goes too far.