Arts

Arts and culture

Stephen Geffre

Stephan Eirik Clark is the author of Sweetness #9 and the short story collection Vladimir’s Mustache, a finalist for the 2013 Minnesota Book Award.

Born in West Germany to a Norwegian mother and a Texan father, Clark split much of his childhood between England and the United States, and has lived in five states and five countries, including Ukraine, where he served a Fulbright Fellowship, and Russia.

Laird Hunt is the award-winning author of a book of short stories, mock parables and histories, The Paris Stories and six novels: The Impossibly, Indiana, Indiana, The Exquisite, Ray of the Star, and Kind One, and Neverhome. His writings, reviews and translations have appeared in the United States and abroad in, among other places, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, McSweeney’s, Ploughshares, Bomb, Bookforum, Grand Street, The Believer, Fence, Conjunctions, Brick, Mentor, Inculte, and Zoum Zoum. Currently on faculty in the University of Denver’s Creative Writing Program, where he edits the Denver Quarterly, he has had residencies at the MacDowell Colony and the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France, and was in residence at Marfa (Lannan Foundation) this past summer. He and his wife, the poet Eleni Sikelianos, live in Boulder, Colorado, with their daughter, Eva Grace.

Chicago born Peter Orner’s fiction and non-fiction has appeared in the New York Times, the Atlantic Monthly, Granta, The Paris Review, McSweeney’s, The Southern Review, The Forward, The San Francisco Chronicle, and Ploughshares. Stories have been anthologized in Best American Stories and twice won a Pushcart Prize. Orner was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship (2006), as well as the two-year Lannan Foundation Literary Fellowship (2007-2008).

Michael Lionstar

James Salter grew up in New York City and was a career officer and Air Force pilot until his mid-thirties, when the success of his first novel, The Hunters (1957), led to a fulltime writing career. Salter’s potent, lyrical prose has earned him acclaim from critics, readers, and fellow novelists. His novel, A Sport and a Pastime (1967), was hailed by the New York Times as “nearly perfect as any American fiction.” His latest book, All That Is, was published to critical acclaim in 2013. He lives in New York and Aspen.

Rob Liguori

Boris Fishman was born in Minsk, in the former Soviet Union, in 1979, and emigrated to the United States in 1988. His journalism, essays, and criticism have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine and Book Review, The New Republic, The Nation, Harper’s, Vogue, The London Review of Books, The Wall Street Journal and other publications.

Beth Gwinn

Karen Joy Fowler is the author of six novels and three short story collections. The Jane Austen Book Club spent thirteen weeks on the New York Times bestsellers list and was a New York Times Notable Book. Fowler’s previous novel, Sister Noon, was a finalist for the 2001 PEN/Faulkner Award for fiction. Her debut novel, Sarah Canary, was a New York Times Notable Book, as was her second novel, The Sweetheart Season. In addition, Sarah Canary won the Commonwealth medal for best first novel by a Californian, and was listed for the Irish Times International Fiction Prize as well as the Bay Area Book Reviewers Prize. Fowler’s short story collection Black Glass won the World Fantasy Award in 1999, and her collection What I Didn’t See won the World Fantasy Award in 2011. Fowler and her husband, who have two grown children and five grandchildren, live in Santa Cruz, California.  www.karenjoyfowler.com

This week on CrossCurrents, Aspen Filmfest runs September 26th-October 2nd. Guests on the show are Laura Thielen and George Eldred from Aspen Film with a preview of this year's event.

Also, Filmfest’s first Documentary Spotlight recipient, Daniel Junge, Oscar award winning documentary filmmaker.

aspenfilm.org

Joshua Ferris is the bestselling author of three novels, Then We Came to the End, The Unnamed and To Rise Again at a Decent Hour. He was a finalist for the National Book Award, winner of the Barnes and Noble Discover Award and the PEN/Hemingway Award, and was named one of The New Yorker’s “20 Under 40” writers in 2010.  His current novel To Rise Again at a Decent Hour is short listed for the Man Booker Prize.  He lives in New York. www.joshuaferris.com

Today on CrossCurrents, screenwriter Lorenzo Semple, Jr. was a fixture in the Aspen community. He was well-known for penning such classics as “3 Days of the Condor”, “Flash Gordon”, “The Parallax View”, “Papillon”, “Never Say Never Again”, the 1960s “Batman” TV series, and many more. Semple died in March at the age of 91. A tribute to his life and work will take place on Tuesday evening, September 23rd, at the Wheeler Opera House. Today, Semple’s children, Maria & Lo, talk about the tribute, their father, his work, and his love of the community.

Alan Lightman is the author of six novels, including Einstein’s Dreams, which was an international best seller and The Diagnosis, a finalist for the National Book Award.  He is also the author of two collections of essays and several books on science.  A theoretical physicist as well as a writer, he has served on the faculties of Harvard and MIT, where he was the first person to receive a dual faculty appointment in science and the humanities.  He lives in the Boston area.

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