Arts

Arts and culture

Tonight at Harris Concert Hall, a debut of sorts: the Emerson String Quartet in its new configuration with Welsh cellist Paul Watkins.  On the Emerson’s program are Haydn’s String Quartet in G minor, Op. 20, No. 3; Britten’s Third String Quartet and the first Razumovzsky quartet by Beethoven.

The concert will be broadcast live on Aspen Public Radio, beginning at 7:59 p.m.

At 6 p.m., conductor Federico Cortese leads the Aspen Philharmonic Orchestra in works by Webern, Schubert and Brahms.  And at 8:30, violinist and festival favorite Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg returns to Aspen for a recital of pieces by Pärt, Prokofiev and Chausson. 

Musical collaborators as well as husband and wife, conductor David Robertson and pianist Orli Shaham preview their separate performances this weekend at the Aspen Music Festival and School. 

Concert explores faith through music, storytelling

Aug 6, 2013
Rebecca Kruth

Tonight (Tues 8-6-13), at the Aspen District Theater, a group of young Jewish musicians will explore the concept of faith through music and storytelling. The performance is called Beyond Belief: Sounds of Sacred Searching. Aspen Public Radio’s Rebecca Kruth went to a rehearsal for a behind-the-scenes peek and filed this report.   

For Cantor Rollin Simmons, the exploration of faith stretches beyond the walls of the Aspen Jewish Congregation where she’s served for the last few years.

Among today's offerings: "Baby Got Bach," master classes, Rimsky-Korsakov's "Scheherazade" and pianist Inon Barnatan in recital.

Bill Faulkner

Robert Boswell has published seven novels, three story collections, and two books of nonfiction. He has had one play produced. His work has earned him two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Iowa School of Letters Award for Fiction, a Lila Wallace/Woodrow Wilson Fellowship, the PEN West Award for Fiction, the John Gassner Prize for Playwriting, and the Evil Companions Award. The Heyday of the Insensitive Bastards was a finalist for the 2010 PEN USA Award in Fiction. What Men Call Treasure was a finalist for the Western Writers of America Nonfiction Spur Award. Both the Chicago Tribune and Publisher’s Weekly named Mystery Ride as one of the best books of the year. The London Independent picked The Geography of Desire as one of the best books of the year. Virtual Death was a finalist for the Philip K. Dick Award and was named by the Science Fiction Chronicle as one of the best novels of the year. Boswell has published more than 70 stories and essays. They have appeared in the New Yorker, Best American Short Stories, O. Henry Prize Stories, Pushcart Prize Stories, Esquire, Colorado Review, Epoch, Ploughshares, and many other magazines and anthologies. He shares the Cullen Endowed Chair in Creative Writing with his wife, Antonya Nelson. They live in Houston, Texas; Las Cruces, New Mexico; and Telluride, Colorado. They also spend time in a ghost town high in the Rockies.

More at robert-boswell.squarespace.com/

Normally a quiet day, this particular Monday features a variety of performances: Rachmaninoff's soulful Cello Sonata in G Minor, the Puccini double bill "Suor Angelica" and "Gianni Schicchi" and veteran soprano Sylvia McNair singing cabaret.

It's another packed weekend. Friday at 6 p.m., pianist Garrick Ohlsson performs the poetic Schumann Piano Concerto with the Aspen Chamber Symphony, and soprano Susanna Phillips sings Britten’s song cycle "Les Illuminations."  Sunday's Aspen Festival Orchestra program features pianist Yefim Bronfman in Bartok's Third Piano Concerto.

Tonight is the premiere of Aspen Opera Theater Center’s Puccini double bill of "Suor Angelica" and "Gianni Schicchi": tragedy and comedy all in one evening.  Also tonight, pianist Garrick Ohlsson performs a recital at Harris Hall.  Works by Beethoven, Chopin, Schubert and American composer Charles Griffes are on his program.

Tonight at 8:30, the American String Quartet performs their annual concert at Harris Concert Hall.  On the program are works by Haydn and Brahms, as well as the dramatic First String Quartet by 20th-century Czech composer Leos Janacek.  

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