Arts

Arts and culture

Leonardo Cendamo

Elizabeth Strout was born in Portland, Maine, and grew up in small towns in Maine and New Hampshire. From a young age she was drawn to writing things down, keeping notebooks that recorded the quotidian details of her days. She was also drawn to books, and spent hours of her youth in the local library lingering among the stacks of fiction. She is the author of Amy and Isabelle, Abide with Me, Olive Kitteridge, for which she won a Pulitzer Prize, and The Burgess Boys. She lives in New York City.

"Fratres" by contemporary Estonian composer Arvo Pärt is part of an eclectic 6 p.m. program, presented by the Percussion Ensemble at Harris Concert Hall.

Weekend No. 5 at the Aspen Music Festival includes a semi-staged opera performance at the Benedict Music Tent and a live Sunday afternoon broadcast on Aspen Public Radio.

NPR hosts are known for their great stories and, sometimes, their unusual names. Aspen Public Radio's Rob St. Mary introduces you to an Aspen area writer and comedian who decided to have some fun with his love of public radio.


Aspen Public Radio’s summer pledge drive is here!

Please take a moment today to make your financial contribution and know that the quality programming you hear on APR is the direct result of your support.

Pianist and faculty member Anton Nel performs a recital at Harris Concert Hall.  Included on his program is Schubert’s grand and final Piano Sonata in B-flat major.

Gil Shaham scales one of the most ambitious and Herculean projects for a solo violinist: the complete sonatas and partitas of Johann Sebastian Bach. Shaham's recital begins at 6 p.m. at Harris Concert Hall.

Conductor and Aspen Music Festival alum Leonard Slatkin talks about his new book, "Conducting Business: Unveiling the Mystery Behind the Maestro."  He also discusses his long-term prognosis for classical music and the orchestra that he currently leads, the Detroit Symphony.

One of the hottest tickets of the summer, Grammy-winning mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato makes her festival debut with a 7:30 p.m. voice recital at Harris Concert Hall.  She sings a varied program, familiar operatic arias by Mozart and Rossini, alongside lesser-known art songs and arias by Obradors, Giocomelli, Di Chiara, Hahn and Donaudy.

David Shankbone

Edwidge Danticat was born in Haiti in 1969 and came to the United States when she was twelve years old. She graduated from Barnard College and received an M.F.A. from Brown University. She writes fiction, memoir, non-fiction and essays. Her books include Breath, Eyes Memory, Krik? Krak!, The Farming of Bones, Brother, I’m Dying, The Dew Breaker, Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work and her latest novel Claire of the Sea Light. She is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, was awarded the American Book Award for The Farming of Bones. Both Krik? Krak! and Brother, I’m Dying received National Book Award Nominations and Brother, I’m Dying won a National Book Critics Circle Award. She lives in Miami with her family.

Violinist and longtime faculty member Sylvia Rosenberg joins faculty colleagues in a 6 p.m. chamber music performance of Mozart’s Piano Quartet in E-flat major, K. 493.

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