Arts and culture

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Joe Seo is an Asian-American actor whose latest role in “Spa Night”, as David —  a gay man growing up in a conservative, Korean household — has won him multiple awards. It’s his big break in the North American film market after years of working in Asia. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Patrick Fort about his experience before the film is screened this week as part of AspenFilm’s Filmfest.

The 38th Annual Aspen Film Filmfest starts on Wednesday. The festival runs through the weekend and screens movies in Carbondale and Aspen.


The classic film “Mr. Mom” is being screened at the Basalt Regional Library on Wednesday.


MarchFourth Marching Band plays at the BellyUp on Thursday.


Valley Comedy All-Stars perform at Loyal Brothers Lounge in Glenwood Springs on Friday.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

  Genna Moe has been a mainstay in the Roaring Fork Valley arts community for almost ten years. She ran children’s programs at the Aspen Art Museum. She worked at the Wheeler Opera House.

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The Center’s floors were ruined when the building near Interstate 70 flooded this summer.

Construction is finally complete on the flood-damaged floors. Tomorrow afternoon, the organization will officially reopen its space. The $11,000 repair was included in the first stage of upgrades to the building.

Dance instruction was hindered due to the damage. Dancing is one of the largest parts of the art group’s programming. Those classes were being held in the Masonic Lodge in Glenwood springs.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Supporters of an extension to the Wheeler Real Estate Transfer Tax met last night at the Wheeler Opera House to discuss how voters can spread awareness about the ballot item.

First Draft - Jennifer Haigh

Sep 12, 2016
Rob Arnold

Jennifer Haigh's new novel is called Heat and Light. She is the author of four previous novels: Faith, The Condition, Baker Towers and Mrs. Kimble, winner of the PEN/Hemingway Award for debut fiction. Her short story collection News From Heaven won the Massachusetts Book Award and the PEN New England Award in Fiction.  Haigh's short stories have appeared in The AtlanticGrantaThe Best American Short Stories and many other places.  She lives in Boston.  

Curated - Sept. 12

Sep 12, 2016

Today on Curated, we speak with author Jennifer Haigh. Choreographer Rennie Harris talks about how he address racial issues with dance. Also, a taxidermist retires and Carbondale's creative district is feeling a cultural shift.

Garbage plays at the Belly up on Wednesday.

The forty ninth year of ruggerfest begins on Thursday and runs through Sunday.

The ski film, Ruin and Rose is holding its world premiere at the Wheeler Opera House on Friday.

The Mick Fleetwood Blues Band plays at the Belly Up on Friday.

In Carbondale, the Dance Initiative is holding its fifth annual Spectrum Dance Festival.

School representatives and members of local arts groups will discuss how Carbondale’s Creative District status and the school’s curriculum can be more in sync on Thursday.


The collaboration won’t begin for another year, but Koenigsknecht hopes to include a framework of project-based learning, where students learn through individual projects.


Crystal River Elementary’s principal, Matt Koenigsknecht, said the goal of this meeting is to come up with a cohesive vision for how the students might be learning.

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More than two decades ago, Rennie Harris started a dance company to try to eliminate negative stereotypes about rap and hip-hop. Now, Harris has multiple companies, and is bringing his Denver-based Grass Roots Project to Carbondale this weekend. Harris spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Patrick Fort about how he talks about race through dance.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Since Carbondale became a certified Creative District earlier this summer, there have been lots of concrete changes to the town. There are signs pointing towards creative business like galleries and restaurants. Coming soon are iPads placed around town to help people find out more about the Creative District.

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The 5Point adventure film festival is bringing their movies outside next Thursday in Carbondale.


“Road from Karakol”, which premiered at the 5Point Film Festival in 2013, is being shown.


The event features some of the highlights from the nonprofit’s four events in Minnesota, North Carolina, Washington state and here in Carbondale.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Don “Slim” Waechtler founded Slim’s Taxidermy in Glenwood Springs in 1981. In his house, he has what he calls his man cave. It has some of the essentials, like a pool table and flat screen TV, but the decorations are a little more nontraditional. You’ll find the heads of moose, elk and bighorn sheep, as well as a full-sized grizzly bear in the corner.

Curated - Sept. 5

Sep 6, 2016

 Lisa Singer’s interpretations of stormy weather are on display at the Art Base in Basalt starting Friday. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Patrick Fort about what creating these paintings does for her state of mind.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Although the ground soaked many shoes through the course of the weekend, closing headliners Duran Duran and Stevie Wonder played to a bustling crowd in Snowmass.  The popular rock band, The Killers, played Saturday night, performing one of their hits, “All These Things That I’ve Done”.

  A new collection of art will be on display at the Glenwood SPrings Branch Library on Wednesday.


A conversation at the Limelight Hotel on Wednesday will seek to demystify the arts. Carbondale Arts’ Amy Kimberly will lead an explanation of sculpture making.


Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds play at the Belly Up on Thursday.


5Point is screening films in Carbondale.


The Art Walk in Basalt celebrates second Fridays.


Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Colorado has the most creative people in the country, according to a nationwide study from the National Endowment for the arts. 65 percent of Coloradans “personally perform or create artworks,” according to the research.

Right now, multiple groups are trying to convince city government that they should be allowed to use the empty library space for offices. The Glenwood Springs Center for the Arts had its main location flood earlier this summer. YouthZone, another nonprofit, found out it would have to leave its current location after a land swap agreement put its building in control of the city, which has other plans for it (affordable housing).

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

For more than 25 years, Jim Horowitz has been putting on some of the biggest music events in the Roaring Fork Valley. But it wasn’t always that way.