Arts

Arts and culture

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When Tom Voss and Anthony Anderson returned from their tours of duty in Iraq, they came back changed men. They were dealing with moral injuries, more than physical ones. Both were dealing with post traumatic stress disorder.

For the final interview of the summer, I sat down with Nancy Wilhelms to take a look back at the events of the summer and talk about the Ranch's plans for the coming fall and winter.  

Curated - Aug. 22

Aug 22, 2016
Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Mark Beauregard was a reporter, but made a decision to write a book after thinking about Herman Melville’s Moby Dick. Melville had a close relationship with Nathaniel Hawthorne, another American writer. They wrote letters to each other that suggest that they were more than friends. Melville’s writing was often about his life, yet Moby Dick is almost always seen as an allegory. Beauregard was struck by this comparison and decided to write about the relationship between Melville and Hawthorne.

 

Courtesy Photo

The 67th year of the festival began with a ceremony dedicating new offices and practice spaces at the Bucksbaum campus in Aspen. Music festival president and CEO Alan Fletcher listed all of the people who were responsible for the renovations at the event.

“We owe so much to community members, the city of Aspen, our patrons our volunteers, all of our donors,” Fletcher said at the dedication in July.

  On Tuesday, the opening reception for the “Surface as Cipher” exhibition starts at five at Anderson Ranch.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Back in the 1970s,  while Andy Stone worked at the Aspen Times, he was questioning himself. He felt that all newspaper reporters had a novel in them. So he decided to follow suit.

His first novel, “Song of the Kingdom”, was published by Doubleday in 1979. After that book’s release, he decided he’d take another crack at the publishing world.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Colorado is investing millions of dollars in the arts throughout the state. The money supports film, public art programs and the state’s creative district program, which tries to help rural economies grow through the arts. In the Roaring Fork Valley, municipalities are figuring out ways to incorporate public art, and make their towns a great place to support artists. In just the past month, the relationship between the arts and government has evolved.

courtesy donaldjtrump.com

 A trio of Republican Governors spoke at the McCloskey speaker series last night in Aspen. Matt Bevin (KY), Pete Ricketts (NE)  and Lawrence Hogan Jr. (MD) discussed the upcoming presidential election how their state’s economies have improved under their leadership.

 

When asked about Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, Bevin said he would not endorse the candidate, but would be voting for him in the upcoming election.

 

This week on Audio Canvas I sit down with Andrea Wallace, chair of the Internship Program, to discuss the importance that this new generation of helping hands has on the Ranch. This weeks episode has been produced by APR intern Matt Kendrick. 

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Tonight, Aspen City Council will hear from the Parks Department about how to handle new public art pieces and the installation process.

Curated - Aug. 15

Aug 15, 2016

First Draft - Helen Schulman

Aug 15, 2016

Helen Schulman is an American novelist, short story, non-fiction, and screenwriter. Her fifth novel, This Beautiful Life, was an international bestseller, and was chosen in the 100 Notable Books of 2011 by the New York Times Book Review.  Schulman has taught in graduate programs at Columbia University, New York University. She teaches at the New School University where she is the Fiction coordinator at the Writing Program and a tenured Professor of Writing.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Governor John Hickenlooper’s book “The Opposite of Woe: My Life in Beer and Politics” was released earlier this year. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio arts reporter Patrick Fort before a book signing in Aspen last week.

  The Aspen Santa Fe Ballet performs on Tuesday at the Aspen District Theatre.

 

The Basalt Public Library will screen “Some Like it Hot” on Wednesday.

 

Dirty Heads play at the Belly Up in Aspen on Wednesday.

 

Artist Hank Willis Thomas speaks at the Aspen Art Museum on Thursday.  

 

Maraca and His Latin Allstars perform at the JAS Cafe at the Little Nell on Friday.

 

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

This year's Red Brick Center for the Arts Plein Air Festival comes to a close Sunday.  “Plein Air” is a French term, meaning “in full or open air”. That’s the attraction for the nearly two dozen participants, including Peter Campbell, of Durango.

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper is presenting his book, The Opposite of Woe: Life in Beer and Politics, this afternoon at Explore Booksellers in Aspen

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

The Snowmass Concert series finishes tonight on Fanny Hill. This summer, most of the shows have avoided the anecdotally present rain that seems to have interfered in previous seasons. The series featured music industry veterans like Taj Mahal and newcomers like Jamestown Revival.

This week at Anderson Ranch I talk to Jessica Cerise and Liz Ferrill to talk about the ArtWorks Store. The ArtWorks Store is open year-round. Summer hours are Monday - Friday, 8:30 am - 5:30 pm and Sunday 12 noon - 6 pm. Non-summer hours are Monday-Friday, 9 am - 5 pm.  

 The Aspen Art Museum held its annual ArtCrush fundraising event on Friday. The museum netted $2.5 million, and was exactly what was expected, according to Aspen Art Museum CEO Heidi Zuckerman. That number is the same compared to last year’s event.

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