Mitchell Gunn/ESPA

One of the U.S. women competing at the World Cup races in Aspen is coming back from a knee injury. This season Resi Stiegler of Jackson Hole is working to again be among the best racers in the world. 

Stiegler will race in slalom over the weekend. It’s among her first competitions after ACL surgery following a crash during a January training run. Last season, her best competition was at the World Cup in Aspen, where she placed eleventh. She says the Aspen race course is one of her favorites with its rolling hills and curves. She wants a solid race here.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Battlement Mesa residents hope to convince Garfield county commissioners that drilling in a residential area is a bad idea.

Get-out-the-vote efforts fell flat in getting young people to the polls for the fall election.

Finishing touches are wrapping up on a World Cup race course at Aspen Mountain.

And, we talk to the head of alpine racing for the U.S. Ski Team about who he thinks will win.

While many people will be feasting this Thanksgiving, others struggle to put food on the table. One nonprofit is helping.

Madeleine Osberger

The U.S. athletes competing in the World Cup races in Aspen this week have a good shot at winning. That’s according to the head of the alpine program for the U.S. Ski Team. Patrick Riml has been traveling with the team to training camps and races. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen caught up with Riml Wednesday, ahead of the start of competition Friday.

Patrick Riml directs the alpine program for the U.S. Ski Team. 

Two more exhibits opening at Aspen Art Museum

Nov 18, 2015

The last of the Aspen Art Museum’s new shows will be opening tomorrow. They’ll be marked by a reception tonight.

Ryan Gander’s exhibit “Make every show like it’s your last” will open Friday, along with a group exhibition called “A Fragile But Marvelous Life.”

Gander’s sculptures are modeled after things like his daughter’s makeshift forts. “A Fragile But Marvelous Life” includes the work of Ian Wilson who is known for his minimalistic style, including works like his 1968 piece “Circle on the floor” which is exactly what it sounds like.


When winter comes, so do changes for the arts scene

Nov 18, 2015
Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Lots of people are coming into town now that skiing is back. Hotels are going to be running at full capacity soon enough, but the arts scene also has to ramp up for the high-season.

How to make a high-class restaurant menu

Nov 17, 2015
Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

  Lots of work goes into putting together a high-quality restaurant menu. What sort of ingredients should` be included? Are there any new trends to follow? Right now, chefs at Element 47 in the Little Nell in Aspen are trying to figure that out.

The look of the forests in the Roaring Fork Valley may be dramatically different in the future. High elevation forests could be replaced with lower growing species like aspens. A new website shows how forests in the American West will look different under climate change. The local nonprofit Aspen Center for Environmental Studies worked with scientists to develop the site.

Jamie Werner is Forest Program Director at ACES. Her laptop’s propped open and she’s clicking around the site,

"So here we have Aspen Mountain and Aspen Highlands…”

Curated - November 9th

Nov 10, 2015

This week's episode of Curated features the La Catrina Quartet, new art exhibits at the Aspen Art Museum and James Bond!

Blue Horizon - Nov. 7, 2015

Nov 7, 2015

With Veterans Day coming up next week, Blue Horizon will be featuring artists who are or were also veterans.

Featured artists include:  Big Bill Broonzy, Hosea Leavy, Junior Wells, Jay McShann, Magic Sam and more.   Here is a video of Vietnam veteran Watermelon Slim: 

Creative Commons/Flickr/Parker Knight

About one in ten kids in Pitkin County are living in poverty. That’s according to a statewide study discussed in Aspen last week. Officials with the Colorado Children’s Campaign visited with parents, elected leaders and child care workers about their latest findings. Shirley Ritter is a child advocate who runs Kids First — an Aspen center subsidized by taxpayers. She spoke with Marci Krivonen.

Shirley Ritter directs Kids First for the city of Aspen.