Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

The look of the forests in the Roaring Fork Valley may be dramatically different in the future. High elevation forests could be replaced with lower growing species like aspens. A new website shows how forests in the American West will look different under climate change. The local nonprofit Aspen Center for Environmental Studies worked with scientists to develop the site.

Jamie Werner is Forest Program Director at ACES. Her laptop’s propped open and she’s clicking around the site,

"So here we have Aspen Mountain and Aspen Highlands…”

Auden Schendler – Aspen Skiing Company, Olivia Siegel – ACES, and Naomi Oreskes – filmmaker and historian on this weekend's showing of the film “Merchants of Doubt” at the Wheeler Opera House.

YouTube/River of Eden

The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies is holding its first-ever film festival on Wednesday. The thirteen films featured are meant to connect people with their environment and inspire advocacy. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

“River of Eden” is one of the films in the festival. Basalt-based photographer Pete McBride traveled to Fiji for the film.

Elise Thatcher

Kids often learn about snow when they're sledding, skiing, or doing other activities in a wintry environment. But the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies takes it a step further. ACES aims to help young people understand a winter landscape more deeply-- like what snow crystals look like up close, and why they change. APR's Elise Thatcher attended a snow science class and files this report.

Your Evening News - December 5th, 2014

Dec 5, 2014

ACES is Aces with Charity Reviewer

The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies has gotten more phone calls and emails than usual today. That’s because the charity has been chosen as one of the best of its kind in the country. The national nonprofit reviewer Charity Navigator has listed ACES as the top botanical garden, park, or nature center. That’s in an online Holiday Giving Guide, put together by the well-respected charity review. ACES CEO Chris Lane found out about the accolade from a reporter with the Aspen Times.

On today's show, the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act and the Maroon Bells birthday bash with Olivia Siegel from ACES, Will Roush of Wilderness Workshop and Andrew Larson of the White River National Forest.

Also, Kelly Alford, Executive Director of Wyly Arts, and artist Jody Guralnick on the new Wyly Annex and Jody's show opening August 8th.

Marci Krivonen

Environmental education is expanding in schools across the Roaring Fork Valley. The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies grew its teaching programs over the last two years to include schools like Basalt Elementary and Carbondale’s Crystal River Elementary school. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, studies show schools with environmental programs score higher on standardized tests.

Environmental educator Melanie Poole instructs a group of kindergarten students plopped down in a semi-circle. Today’s lesson is about duck adaptations.

Marci Krivonen

In the future, the forests surrounding Aspen will look different. Already, mountain shrubs are replacing some Aspen stands and changing the complexion of the area.   This is likely due to due a warming climate.

The Nature Conservancy

The Nature Conservancy’s chief scientist will be speaking in Aspen Thursday. M. Sanjayan also contributes environmental reports to CBS News. In Aspen, he will talk about the role of conservation in improving human well-being, wildlife and the environment. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

M. Sanjayan is the lead scientist for the Nature Conservancy. He’s speaking at Peapcke Auditorium Thursday at 6:30pm. The event is being put on by the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies.

Marci Krivonen

Last month the Obama Administration laid out a plan to help plants and animals deal with the impacts of climate change. Already, polar bears are losing sea ice and waterfowl are flying south weeks later than decades before. The plan lays out strategies on how to help animals survive these changes.

In Aspen, a group of citizen scientists hope to do the same thing. They’re getting trained on how to recognize and record changes to the environment. The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies is behind the effort. The group hopes to make it easier to track changes.