Aspen City Council

Hunt scraps lodge project on Main Street

Aug 19, 2015

One of Aspen’s gas station will not be torn down for an affordable lodge. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

Developer Mark Hunt on Wednesday officially withdrew his Base 2 lodge project, even though it was already approved by Aspen officials. Instead, he will submit a new application for a two-story commercial building. That’s to replace the Conoco on Main Street, across from Carl’s Pharmacy.

Elise Thatcher

  It’s now more likely that Aspenites will decide the future of a lodge on Main Street. Aspen City Clerk Linda Manning says there are more than enough valid signatures to have a ballot measure in the fall. Petition organizers want Aspen residents to decide whether to allow the “Base 2” project.

Concerns about how Aspen is developing prompted a city councilman Monday to ask for an analysis of development projects already approved. 

Aspen resident Ward Hauenstein told council Monday he’s worried.

"City government has had the vision and courage to limit growth. I fear that our representatives have lost that vision and courage."

aspenpitkin.com

The City of Aspen is in the throes of deciding where to put government offices in the future. Tuesday afternoon (7/14) council narrowed three options to two. 

City departments like police and engineering are currently in leased space that before long, will become unavailable. City council is examining two solutions. Both include building new structures and have price tags above $48 million.

aspenpitkin.com

Aspen City Council is getting behind a national effort to address climate change. On Monday council gave initial support for what’s called a “Carbon Fee and Dividend” proposal. 

In June seven Roaring Fork Valley residents, including an Aspen city staffer, traveled to Washington DC to sway elected officials to support the Carbon Fee and Dividend policy proposal. It would apply a fee to carbon-based fuels. Revenues from the fee would be returned to households across the country.

 

Petitioners are getting signatures in an attempt to stop a hotel from being built in Aspen. As of last week, organizers have beyond the 680 signatures needed to get on the ballot for a public vote later this year. The question would be whether a hotel, called Base 2, should move forward.

plexiglassplus.com

A change to Aspen’s development requirements is not retroactive. That’s the opinion of an attorney hired by the City after a recent charter amendment. Voters decided last month that an election is needed if developers want exceptions for how big a project can be, or how much affordable housing or parking is required.

GrassRoots TV screenshot

Aspen City Council swore in members new and old Monday night. That included a grassroots organizer known for criticizing the group. Newly elected Bert Myrin took an oath with returning councilman Adam Frisch.

https://twitter.com/bertmyrin

  

Voters have chosen a winner for Aspen’s last City Council seat. Bert Myrin handily won in a runoff election that ended Tuesday night. In preliminary results, Myrin snagged 65% to Mick Ireland's 34%.

GrassRoots TV

Last night, Aspen City Council approved a second affordable lodge proposal by prolific land owner Mark Hunt. Councilmembers gave the go-ahead for what’s called Base 2. It would replace a Conoco gas station on Main Street, and off-site parking has been a point of contention.

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