Aspen City Council

Welcome to a Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

 

A group of locals, including two former mayors, are pushing elected leaders to ban chain stores in Aspen’s downtown core. They are afraid there won’t be anywhere to shop or eat for the average person. But there could be some serious unintended consequences for the commercial landscape and the local economy.

Courtesy Photo

 

Last year, the Aspen City Council took a chance by bankrolling a citizen-led initiative meant to help young entrepreneurs.

Spaces that occupy stores like Brunello Cucinelli, Prada and Moncler were once locally serving businesses. As in, the average person could buy stuff without draining their bank account. Now, there’s an idea afloat to ban chain stores in town. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason explores this issue with area journalists on Valley Roundup.

 

You can hear more of the conversation on Valley Roundup at 3:30 p.m. today right here on Aspen Public Radio news.

 

Aspen’s elected officials are inching forward with their plans to overhaul government buildings.

 

Roger Adams

After sitting on prime Aspen real estate for years, the city council is making moves to develop new affordable rental units in town.

Barbara Platts / Aspen Public Radio News

Aspen councilman Bert Myrin was elected into office on an anti-development platform. Now, with several months left before the end of a development moratorium, he speaks with Alycin Bektesh on the future of building in Aspen. The first public hearing on the changes is scheduled for October 24th.

Wilderness Workshop

Aspen City Council voted unanimously last night to keep the water rights to build reservoirs on Maroon and Castle creeks. The vote comes despite public opposition.

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio News

Local governments are opening up their spreadsheets as the 2017 budget process begins Tuesday.

  Aspen’s historic preservation commission (HPC) is a volunteer board with a lot of power. The group reviews developments within designated historic districts in town. HPC makes the final call for many new buildings — even going against City Council recommendations.

Barbara Platts/Aspen Public Radio

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Politics is heating up in Basalt and now that the town manager up and resigned, the government  and its elected leaders are facing heavy scrutiny.

Barbara Platts/Aspen Public Radio

Government transparency, civil discourse and what to do now that the town manager has quit are issues facing the town of Basalt. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup are Scott Condon, reporter for the Aspen Times, Cindy Hirschfeld, editor of Aspen Sojourner Magazine and Aspen Times columnist Roger Marolt.

You can hear more of the conversation which includes Aspen Daily News Editor Curtis Wackerle at 3:30 p.m. on Aspen Public Radio news.

 

Courtesy of Myles Rademan

More than 70 Park City business people, government officials and nonprofit leaders are planning a visit to Aspen next month as part of their annual pilgrimage to other ski resort towns.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

All of the tearing down of homes and buildings in Pitkin County means most of that debris is heading to the landfill, which has 15 years left of life on it. City of Aspen officials are considering making it mandatory to recycle that material.

Hard choices 
are forecast for construction waste diversion

The majority of construction waste in the valley is going straight to the county landfill and elected officials are hoping to curb some of that. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup are Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, Andy Stone, columnist for the Aspen Times and Randy Essex, publisher of the Glenwood Post Independent.

You can hear more of the conversation at 3:30 p.m. today.

 

Barbara Platts/Aspen Public Radio News

As the City of Aspen works to maintain a healthy forest, developers face hefty fees to remove trees. Sometimes, though, city council is willing to let the trees fall in order to save a building.

Carolyn Sackariason/Aspen Public Radio News

After $1 million and two years of work, the “Mill Street Complete Streets” project needs some refinement. After the city heard complaints from motorists, traffic will be re-routed through the intersection of Main and Mill Streets. Carolyn Sackariason met up with the city’s senior project manager, Justin Forman, and city engineer Trish Aragon to talk about the changes.

 

Alycin Bektesh / Aspen Public Radio

As homeowners build, renovate, and expand their properties, the leftover construction materials head right to the dump. Monday night, Aspen City Council will looking at how to address the growing amount of waste created by the construction industry.

Elected officials are taking the high road today when it comes to understanding the local marijuana industry. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

Aspen City Council members are taking a field trip this afternoon to three pot shops in the downtown core. They’ll spend 20 minutes or so at each one in hopes of learning something about an industry they are considering regulating.

 

Welcome to Valley Roundup during this summer’s pledge drive. I’m Carolyn Sackariason. Thank you for listening and your support. It’s listeners like you who we rely on to produce shows like Valley Roundup so please take a moment and make your financial contribution. No pledge is too small or large! We are here to take your donation. Please call 920-9000 or pledge right here online. And now, let’s get on with the show.

City of Apsen

After nearly five hours of deliberation Tuesday night, Aspen City Council couldn’t come to a consensus on whether to build a new $31 million City Hall.

Council was given a few different options on how to house all of the city’s departments. Council members Ann Mullins and Art Daily want the “Galena” option. That would put all city services in one 52,000-square-foot building across from Rio Grande Park.

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