Aspen City Council

  Concerns about  Aspen's Chamber of Commerce and a ballot referendum got a close look at Monday night’s City Council meeting. Backers of the referendum argue it's inappropriate for the Aspen Chamber Resort Association to lobby against the local measure, since the group receives public funding through the City of Aspen. They also point out it looks shady that two City Council members are part of the Chamber's campaign.

Ballots will be dropped in the mail today for the Aspen municipal election. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has the details.

Around 6,100 ballots will be mailed to registered voters. City Clerk Linda Manning hopes to get back less than a third of those--about 2,500. If you haven’t received a ballot by Friday, contact her office in City Hall, or just come in person.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

Glenwood Springs has two new council members.

It looks like the Thompson Divide will be safe from oil and gas drilling. But, what about other areas and how do residents there feel about that sort of activity in their backyards?

There’s movement and millions of dollars in play in getting a base village built at the base of Snowmass ski area.

Meanwhile, a new executive director has been hired at the Wheeler Opera House.

And, an Aspen City Council candidate is being scrutinized for something he did 10 years ago.

Joining me this week are Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, Jill Bethard, editor of the Snowmass Sun, Randy Essex, editor of the Glenwood Post Independent and Michael Miracle, editor of Aspen Sojourner magazine.

Elise Thatcher

Last night, Aspen City Council candidate Bert Myrin defended altering opposing campaign materials ten years ago, to benefit a political cause. The issue came up during the Aspen Chamber Resort Association candidate forum.

Today on CrossCurrents – a portion of the live Town Hall event from the Belly Up Aspen on the "Keep Aspen Aspen" ballot referendum with Carolyn Sackariason, Michael Kinsley, Michael Behrendt, Marcella Larson, Bill Stirling and Ann Mullins.

http://aspenpublicradio.org/post/live-event-keep-aspen-aspen-ballot-referendum-town-hall

Roger Adams

Former Aspen Mayor Mick Ireland is in familiar territory. He’s out campaigning for office like he’s done several times before. This time, Ireland is hoping to fill one of two open seats on city council. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Ireland served as a Pitkin County Commissioner for 13 years and mayor for six. He grew up in a family of public servants, he says.

https://twitter.com/bertmyrin

Questions have been raised about the integrity of an Aspen City Council candidate. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has the story.

An affidavit signed by Bert Myrin acknowledges he manipulated a message from a powerful local business group deliberately misrepresenting the organization’s position on a visitor’s center proposal in 2004.

The candidates and issues in the upcoming Aspen election will be debated Wednesday evening. The Aspen Chamber Resort Association is holding its forum for the 2015 election at the Limelight Hotel on April 8th from 4:30pm to 8pm. The event will be a moderated forum that will allow the public to hear from city council and mayoral candidates. The mayoral candidates will start at 5pm, followed by the city council at 6pm, and the evening wraps up with a discussion of the charter amendment on zoning at 7pm.

Facebook/Keith Goode

 

Next week ballots go in the mail for Aspen’s municipal election. Voters will choose from a large pool of candidates to fill two open seats on city council. Keith Goode is one of seven people running. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

"Reporter: Why are you running for city council?"

 

Goode: "I’ve been on the Planning and Zoning Board for the last four years and I really have enjoyed my time there. But, the main reason is when I hear people say ‘Aspen’s losing its character,’ I don’t buy that."

Aspen City Council is considering eliminating a longtime housing option for local workers. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

It’s called the “Accessory Dwelling Unit” program and it’s been around for decades. The idea was that wealthy homeowners would offset their development impacts by building a separate dwelling unit from the main house so a local worker could live there. But it’s a voluntary program and many of them remain empty. At Tuesday’s work session, City Councilman Adam Frisch told his colleagues that the program should be eliminated.

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