Aspen Ideas Festival

The Aspen Ideas Festival is an annual week long gathering that offers a variety of programs, tutorials, seminars, discussions and events that bring together vibrant intellectual exchange. You'll hear on some of the live sessions from the Aspen Ideas Festival here on Aspen Public Radio.

Afternoon of Conversation

* PepsiCo Chairperson and CEO Indra Nooyi in conversation with David Bradley

* Former Vice President Al Gore with David Gergen

* Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair in conversation with Andrea Mitchell

* The Race Card Project with NPR’s Michele Norris and Guests

* Gen. David Petraeus (Ret., US Army) in conversation with Bob Schieffer

Screenshot from aspeninstitute.org

Colorado residents can vote this fall on whether communities can limit oil and gas drilling. The state supreme court approved four ballot measures Monday, June 30th, that allows such questions. The decision comes as Democratic Governor John Hickenlooper is in Aspen, speaking at the Ideas Festival about existing rules for the industry. He was joined yesterday by the head of the Environmental Defense Fund, Fred Krupp.

Fracking: Is There a Fix to the Fight?

Domestic shale gas has transformed the US energy equation, but its development can have unacceptable impacts on air and water quality, while methane emissions from oil and gas development can undo the climate benefit of burning natural gas instead of other fossil fuels. Colorado has led the way with the nation's strongest air pollution standards for oil and gas development, including the first direct regulation of methane. Governor John Hickenlooper and Environmental Defense Fund President Fred Krupp, who worked closely on the breakthrough rules in Colorado, lead a discussion of the way forward for shale gas.

Fred Krupp, John Hickenlooper, Gillian Tett

The Road to Depth: Thinking about what Character Is

Some people seem to lead inner lives that are richer and more substantive than the rest of us. How do they do it? This talk is a survey of some of history's most substantive characters. How love, suffering, struggle, surrender and obedience lead them to their depth.

David Brooks has been an op-ed columnist for The New York Times since 2003 and is a commentator for “PBS Newshour,” NPR’s “All Things Considered,” and NBC’s “Meet the Press.” Brooks also teaches at Yale University. He was a senior editor at The Weekly Standard, contributing editor at Newsweek and The Atlantic, a reporter and editor at The Wall Street Journal, and worked at The Washington Times. Brooks began his journalism career as a police reporter for the City News Bureau. He has authored three books, most recently The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement.

The Service Year: Creating a New Cultural Norm

Imagine a world in which most young Americans completed a year of national service. How would this contribute to transforming our country and our world? How do we reinvigorate our sense of civic duty and redefine success for the next generation in a way that integrates and institutionalizes national service into our culture? How can government, higher education, philanthropic organizations, the private sector, media, and service organizations can work together to foster a culture of national service over the next decade? How can we work together to make a service year a rite of passage and common expectation for young Americans through the creation of 1 million annual service-year positions? The panel will discuss the potential economic, political, international, community, and individual benefits that could be gained through large-scale national service.

Stanley A. McChrystal, Carrie Hessler-Radelet, Elliot Gerson

Airbnb: How the Sharing Economy is Redefining the Marketplace and Our Sense of Community

Airbnb does business in 34,000 cities, has a valuation of over 10 billion dollars, and in a very short time has disrupted the world of hospitality and travel. Its co-founder and CEO Brian Chesky envisions the future city as a place where sharing is front and center — where people become micro-entrepreneurs, the local mom and pops will flourish once again, where space isn’t wasted, but shared, and more of almost everything is produced, except waste. But the journey from here to there won’t be all smooth sailing. What are the ups and downs of the sharing economy, as businesses like Airbnb confront critiques about regulation, economic development, and fairness? What role might businesses play in creating more shareable, more livable cities? How will the sharing economy, with its de-emphasis on ownership, be a tool for addressing urban inequality?

Brian Chesky, Jennifer Bradley

Wealth and the Modern American Family

The president of one of the nation's top investment institutions shares how changing family roles and dynamics affect wealth management.

Keith Banks, Gillian Tett

Keith Banks is president of U.S. Trust, which provides integrated investment, trust, banking, and lending services to wealthy and ultra-wealthy clients. He also oversees wealth management banking and Bank of America Global Capital Management. Banks joined FleetBoston Financial in 2000 as CIO and CEO of the asset management organization before its merger with Bank of America in 2004. With Bank of America, he served as president of Global Wealth and Investment Management and president and CIO of Columbia Management Group.

Gillian Tett writes two weekly columns for the Financial Times, covering a range of economic, financial, political, and social issues worldwide since 1993. In 2014, she was named columnist of the year by the British Press Awards. In 2012, she received a SABEW Award for best feature article. She was previously awarded a President’s Medal by the British Academy in 2011 and was recognized as Journalist of the Year in 2009 and Business Journalist of the Year in 2008 by the British Press Awards, as well as Senior Financial Journalist of the Year (2007) by the Wincott Awards.

Can Congress Come Together to Build a Healthier Nation?

There's much more to health politics than the Affordable Care Act. Along with remarkable new advances in medicine by 2024, we will see Baby Boomers swamping the health care system, more veterans needing services, and the impact of climate change becoming ever more apparent. Leaders from both political parties in both houses of Congress should be shaping the vision, negotiating the legislation and committing the funding to improve the nation’s health. What can Congress do to promote better health for more Americans? How can our elected officials reach consensus?

William Frist, Thomas Daschle, Julie Rovner, Mickey Edwards

Communities That Thrive

Healthy communities put people first, with safe housing, convenient schools and workplaces, and ready access to food, water, recreation and sustainable transportation. Rural or urban, resource-rich or impoverished, they offer opportunity and hope, and reward imagination and ingenuity. These places also foster a sense of shared purpose, perhaps sporting community centers and gardens, resource-sharing activities and microenterprise, sidewalks and bike lanes. What are the must-have features of a healthy community? How should small towns and large cities be designed in the future? What does the explosion of mega-metropolises around the world mean to health?

Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, Gabe Klein, Kennedy Odede, Gina Murdock, Belinda Reininger

Personalized Medicine: The Future is Now

Personalized medicine is upending hierarchies with consumer products like Scanadu, designed to track physiological signals, and 23andMe.com, which provides raw genetic data. Meanwhile, our exploding knowledge means treatments can increasingly be custom-tailored — the genetic characteristics of a tumor can predict the most effective drug to fight it; a medical image can reveal which artery-opening device will be most effective for a particular individual. How does personalized medicine change the way medicine is practiced? Is it possible to know too much? Does the US need a new regulatory framework for this unprecedented era?

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