Aspen Ideas Festival

The Aspen Ideas Festival is an annual week long gathering that offers a variety of programs, tutorials, seminars, discussions and events that bring together vibrant intellectual exchange. You'll hear on some of the live sessions from the Aspen Ideas Festival here on Aspen Public Radio.

Women’s Health: The Unfinished Revolution

Jun 25, 2014

Women’s Health: The Unfinished Revolution

The phrase “women’s health” slips off the tongues of clinicians, public health experts, community advocates and legislators with ease, but the ideological battles of the past three decades have clouded this once-useful term. Reproductive health services and access to family planning promote health and combat poverty, but they do not represent the sum of women’s health needs or rights. Women also differ from men in how they develop, age, and respond to treatment, yet the science of their unique characteristics is alarmingly incomplete. What is “women’s health” really about, and how we do re-imagine its future?

Jane Otai, Sisonke Msimang, Courtney E. Martin, Betty King

THE ASPEN LECTURE When Experts Disagree: The Art of Medical Decision-Making

Despite medical advances and the application of scientific principles to modern medicine, there seems to be increasing controversy about the “right” diagnostic and treatment choices, even for very common medical issues – such as how best to treat high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol, whether to take vitamins, especially vitamin D, and who should be screened for cancer with mammograms and PSA. And the debate is very public, fomenting confusion with almost daily stories in the media. Why are experts disagreeing? Why isn't there a clear “right” answer? And what support do patients need to make decisions in the face of such controversy?

Jerome Groopman, Pamela Hartzband

Colorado's "Right to Try" Law: A Lifeline or False Hope?

Colorado’s new “right-to-try” law, signed in May, allows terminally ill patients access to investigational drugs without federal approval. Similar legislation is being considered in other states. Supporters call it a ray of hope for people with few alternatives, while skeptics argue that the hopes could be false and the suffering worsened. The US Food and Drug Administration already has compassionate-use mechanisms in place, but action at the state level is a first. What are the clinical and ethical implications of Colorado’s action? Are states usurping federal authority? What are the rights of dying people here?

Elliot Gerson, Joe Garcia, Diane E. Meier

2014 Aspen Institute Broadcast Schedule

Jun 23, 2014

Aspen Public Radio is proud to continue its long-term partnership with The Aspen Institute to bring you another summer of informative and stimulating keynote lectures. 

NOTE: This is the schedule of the lectures/events Aspen Public Radio plans to broadcast. Due to the fluid nature of the Aspen Institute's events, this schedule is expected to change with limited notice.

Tuesday June 24th

8pm-9pm
Colorado's "Right to Try" Law: A Lifeline or False Hope?

Wednesday June 25th

Today on CrossCurrents, a speaker from this year's Ideas Fest, Danah Boyd.

Danah Boyd is a principal researcher at Microsoft Research; a research assistant professor in media, culture, and communication at New York University, and a Fellow at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society

http://www.aspenideas.org/speaker/danah-boyd

feministing.com

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio.

This is our final episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll hear about a program to get more humanities students to become doctors, even if they major in, say philosophy.

“And then come to medical school without having had to take many of the traditional science requirements, and without having to take the MCAT.”

That’s the Medical College Admission Test, for all of you who’ve avoided the rigors usually required to become a doctor.

And those more well-rounded physicians could end up working in what Doctor Kenneth Davis calls the hospital of the future

“The providers of health care have no choice but to change. What we have to ask ourselves is with those changes, will we be improving access, and will we be improving quality.”

That’s this hour, on Spotlight Health.

feministing.com

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio. This is the fifth episode in our series on key health issues.

Today we’ll hear about ways technology is making it easier for people to live their lives. That includes prosthetics and robotics. Think of one of those really cool science terms you learned back in grade school or middle school. Exosekelton! A Roaring Fork Valley resident is using one to start moving again.

And the ever expanding field of 3-D printing could make that even more effective.

That’s this hour on Spotlight Health.

Amanda Boxtel, Bridging Bionics Foundation

Many people already use prosthetics to get around; now robotics is becoming another way to help people move. It’s already the case for a Basalt resident, Amanda Boxtel, who’s been paralyzed below her pelvis for decades. Boxtel is Executive Director of the Bridging Bionics Foundation. She says it’s been important to her to aim for the best quality of life possible. She talks with APR’s Elise Thatcher.

ted.com

Living with a missing limb is difficult, especially if keeps someone from working or taking care of their family. Krista Donaldson is CEO of D-Rev, a nonprofit that designs technology to help with certain problems in developing countries. Donaldson is working on a prosthetic knee that’s affordable and reliable. 

APR Special: Spotlight Health, Show #4

May 27, 2014
feministing.com

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio.

I’m Elise Thatcher, and this is the fourth in our series on critical health issues.

We’re going to explore the state of health and sports these days especially kids’ athletics.

“We put kids in uniform at age three, we got adults screaming on the sidelines at age six, and we create the travel teams at seven and eight…”

We’ll also get the details on research about staying young… using younger blood. You may have already heard about it.

“This research, may suggest that Bram Stoker had ideas ahead of his time.

That was a medical professor named Andrew Randall commenting on the shocking news on what may make us all live forever. Drinking blood?

It doesn’t actually involve children’s blood… but we’ll let our guest explain.

That’s this hour on Spotlight Health.

Pages