The Aspen Skiing Company

Marci Krivonen

After seeing the tricks, flips and crashes at last week’s Winter X Games, it’s hard to understand why someone would take such risks. And yet, terrain parks with similar, but smaller features are ubiquitous at ski areas around the country. Education around how to be safe in these parks is growing. And, as Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, the efforts are also meant to draw more people to snowboarding, which has seen a drop in popularity on the slopes.

Elise Thatcher

For the first time in seven years, snowboarding phenom Shaun White did not take home the X Games gold for Super Pipe. The Flying Tomato decided to save his legs for the Olympics in a matter of weeks… and Danny Davis took home the gold. That was the last event for this winter’s X Games… and early signs are that it may have been successful

Editor's note: Below is a transcript of reporter Elise Thatcher's story.

[Sound of snowboarder landing on the ice in the SuperPipe, during men’s finals.]

Elise Thatcher

One year ago today, Caleb Moore crashed during the Snowmobile Freestyle event of the X Games. He later died from his injuries. The crash led to some changes in how that event was run. Still, despite the inherent dangers, the Snowmobile Freestyle contest goes on.
 

Editor’s note: below is a transcript of reporter Elise Thatcher’s story.

Announcer: “It all comes down to the score… oh my gosh! He’s going to pick up where he left off, the gold…”

If you’ve skied one of the four Aspen Skiing Company’s mountains, you’ve probably seen the common safety warnings. Signs range from “slow” to “no straightlining.” Now, Ski Co is part of a month-long effort by the National Ski Areas Association to drill that message home. 

 

When you get off the Elk Camp Gondola at Snowmass, there’s a tent with tantalizing free cider, stickers and Clif bars… that is if you can first pass a quiz about safety.  Tackling that issue  on the slopes is a multifaceted affair. Level one is, well, skiing more slowly. 

Elise Thatcher

It’s been called a Swiss cheese mountain—that’s Aspen Mountain, and it’s filled with holes from a history of mining. Some caverns are ten stories high. Telling stories about them--and other tales of years gone by-- is all in a day’s work for History Coach Mike Monroney. He hosts ski tours for the Aspen Historical Society. Aspen Public Radio's Elise Thatcher clicked into her skis and joined the Aspen Mountain tour last week.

Below is a transcript of reporter Elise Thatcher’s story.

Valley Roundup - January 3rd, 2014

Jan 3, 2014

Carolyn Sackariason and Andy Stone join us to talk about the big news this week including the Silver Queen Gondola on Aspen Mountain.  Right at peak ski season the lift blew a wheel bearing - a big one.

The grounded ski lift appears to have had little effect on tourism in town.  It is shaping up to be one of the best Holiday season’s in recent years.

Also today we look at Colorado’s mark on history.  You can now walk into a store, buy some ganja, fire up the bong and toke it up…and it’s all legal.  This is such a big story that Colorado’s biggest news paper hired a marijuana editor to handle the news flow.

Its all head on today’s Valley Roundup.

Aspen Skiing Company

The last ten days of the year is the busiest part of the ski season in Aspen. And smack in the middle of it, the Aspen Skiing Company was forced to close the fastest way to the top of Aspen Mountain. The Silver Queen Gondola was out of commission for three days, thanks to a broken bearing. Skiers had to take several lifts to the top, creating a kind of “Aspen unplugged” experience. That is, until the Ski Co had a private jet deliver the replacement part.  

Below is a transcript of reporter Elise Thatcher's story:

Elise Thatcher

There’s a wine shortage… and it could get worse. So predicts a recent report by banking giant Morgan Stanley. The report blames bad weather and other factors for a looming shortage of fine wines. What is not clear is if the forecast is right. At least one financial writer calls the report a ploy to boost certain investments. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with Aspen sommelier Tim Baldwin, Assistant Food and Beverage Director at The Little Nell in Aspen. First, she asked him what his take is on the wine shortage.

Interview: Paula and Jim Crown

Oct 31, 2013
PaulaCrown.com

  In October, The Aspen Skiing Company was one of ten companies to receive an award from American for the Arts.  The awards went to the 10 "Best Businesses Partnering with the Arts in America."  Among them were Bacardi, Turner Broadcasting and Microsoft.  The inspiration behind this commitment to art comes in large part from Paula and Jim Crown, Managing Partners of the Aspen Skiing Company.  Paula Crown also is an artist.  They spoke with APR’s Roger Adams. 

Marci Krivonen

Residents of the Roaring Fork Valley work a wide range of jobs, from ski lift operators and bus drivers to carpenters and seasonal police officers who patrol for signs of bears. Today we start a series we’re calling Working The Valley.

Kurt Fehrenbach is a long-time Valley resident who splits his time teaching skiing in the winter and helping mountain bikers in the summer. His job as a Bike Pro in Snowmass Village is relatively new but, he says, he’s been biking nearly all his life. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

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