Aspen

Aspen Ideas touches on violence, health care, religion

Jun 26, 2015
Marci Krivonen

Health care, violence and the wage gap are a few topics to be tackled at this year’s Aspen Ideas Festival. The 10-day event started Thursday (6/25). 

It’s the Festival’s eleventh year and this year it looks different.

"We decided to freshen it up a little bit and change some things around, and we’re sitting in a new pavilion," she says.

Jim Salter leaves his mark on Aspen

Jun 25, 2015

By all accounts, Jim Salter was one of the smartest people who spent time in Aspen, and he had the dogs to match.

 

 

"He also had the most intelligent dogs," says Bill Stirling is a long-time resident and former mayor of aspen. His late wife, Katharine Thalberg, founded Explore Bookstore, where Stirling met Salter. "They were corgis. They were very long and low to the ground and highly intelligent which would be just the kind of dog Jim would have. You could almost speak to those dogs and expect a pretty good reply from them."

Facebook/Protegete:Nuestro Aire, Nuestra Salud

The number of ethnic minorities involved in environmental organizations across the country is dismally low and it’s the same in the Roaring Fork Valley. Some statewide groups have noticed the problem and are creating programs for the Latino community. They say reaching this population is an important step toward reducing carbon emissions. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Dulce Saenz immigrated with her family to Colorado from Mexico when she was a toddler. She says she heard the term “carbon footprint” for the first time last year.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week. 

A news story about a missing Aspen native has created a  ruckus among longtime residents.

As summer sets in, so does the homeless population in Glenwood Springs, which is angst in the business community.

Meanwhile, a custody dispute involving a Snowmass Village father has garnered international attention.

When is a service dog a legitimate reason to take the pet into a restaurant or live in affordable housing?

Facebook/Pitkin Co. Open Space and Trails

Heavy rain Tuesday night boosted the Roaring Fork River in Aspen to flood stage. Minor flooding is possible in low-lying areas. 

Flows in the Aspen stretch of the Roaring Fork were nearly four times the typical amount Wednesday morning. Pitkin County Sheriff Joe Disalvo says people with homes in a floodplain should be prepared to sandbag and self-rescue if waters get too high.

Marci Krivonen

The White River National Forest is encouraging backcountry campers to use bear-proof canisters to store their food. It’s an education effort this year and will become law next summer. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The Ute Mountaineer in Aspen is one of a handful of stores in the Roaring Fork Valley renting and selling bear-proof canisters. The hard plastic, round containers have names like “Bear Keg” and “Bear Vault.” Nathan Martinez is store manager.

Search for missing Aspen man suspended

Jun 8, 2015
Creative Commons/Flickr/Mark Donoher

A search for a missing Aspen man has been called off. Will Graham, 31, went missing Thursday. Law enforcement found his vehicle and some belongings at the Devil’s Punchbowl, a popular summertime recreation spot east of Aspen. A multi-day search ensued, involving overnight patrols and a swift water rescue team. If new information is uncovered, the search will resume. The Pitkin County Sheriff’s Office is asking anyone with information to call them at (970) 920-5300.

roaringfork.org

There’s less water from the Roaring Fork River being diverted to the East Slope this spring and it’s increasing flood danger. Over the weekend, law enforcement in Aspen and Basalt monitored high flows. Wetter-than-normal conditions on the East Slope temporarily stopped diversions through the Twin Lakes tunnel. They’ll start up again later this month. Bill Linn is Assistant Police Chief in Aspen.

aspenk12.net

The Aspen School District is hoping a change to its affordable housing rules will attract and retain more employees. Starting in August, school staff living in district rentals will only be allowed to live there five years. The school’s Employee Transitional Housing Program includes 43 units, mostly in Woody Creek and Snowmass Village.

The goal, says school superintendent John Maloy, is to provide more room for newly hired staff. He says last year, there was just one unit open for 27 new employees.

Elise Thatcher

CenturyLink is investigating who the perpetrator was that caused thousands of its Roaring Fork Valley customers to not have cellular, landline or internet service for more than 16 hours on Tuesday and Wednesday.  

Facebook/Aspen Hope Center

The Aspen Hope Center turns five on June 1st. The nonprofit serves those in emotional crisis with most clients either dealing with mental health problems or substance abuse. Last year, the organization made headlines as it worked to tackle the problem of suicide after a cluster of deaths happened in a matter of days. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The organization started in 2010 after a study showed the Roaring Fork Valley needed more mental health services. Aspen resident Joe Disalvo already knew that.

Marci Krivonen

The late Willard Clapper was honored in the Mid-Valley yesterday. A baseball field at Crown Mountain Park in El Jebel was named for the Aspen resident and longtime teacher who was deeply involved in local athletics. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Dozens of people gathered in the rain Wednesday to dedicate the field to Willard Clapper. The former teacher, volunteer firefighter and baseball coach died in October after battling lymphoma.

"Most of you know that I’m Willard’s daughter and I’m very proud (to be)," said Ashley Austin. 

Historic Aspen church could see renovation, expansion

May 4, 2015
Marci Krivonen

A 120-year-old church in Aspen is raising money to renovate and expand. St. Mary’s Catholic Church on Main Street is one of the town’s most historic buildings. But it’s maxed out and church officials say more space is needed. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

For more than a century mass has been held regularly at St. Mary’s, even when miners moved out and the town’s population shrank.

One of three construction projects at the busiest intersection in downtown Aspen is almost done with its first phase. But it won’t be entirely finished until the middle of next month. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

A group of children exits the Pitkin County Library. They may unfamiliar with the sounds on the street, but any pedestrian or motorist who’s been on Mill Street lately has no doubt heard all kinds of construction activity. From catering trucks and backhoes to jackhammers and massive drills, welcome to the sounds of spring in Aspen.

Aspen City Council race: Marcia Goshorn

Apr 7, 2015
Marci Krivonen

We continue our series profiling the candidates running for Aspen City Council. Seven people are vying for two open seats. Candidate Marcia Goshorn is frustrated with city council. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains why.

Goshorn has lived in Aspen for nearly four decades. She first visited in 1960. Now she runs a property management company and keeps a close eye on city hall. She says council isn’t listening to citizens.

Pothole problems pronounced in Colorado high country

Apr 1, 2015
Marci Krivonen

It’s that time of year...when the weather’s freeze-thaw pattern causes deep caverns to form on city streets and state highways. Potholes are ubiquitous almost everywhere but in the high country, the weather’s more extreme so the roads are ripe for ripping open. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

It’s the morning rush hour on West Main Street in Aspen. Buses, cars and construction vehicles stream into town.

Reporter: "So this is the problem area?"

Snow, precip totals for March close to average in Aspen

Mar 31, 2015
Marci Krivonen

After a dry start to the year, the month of March brought much needed moisture to the Aspen region. 

Marci Krivonen

This election voters in Aspen will choose from a full list of candidates. A history of several candidates running for local office isn’t uncommon in Aspen. In fact, it’s the norm. This year, two people are running for a two-year mayor’s term. Seven are running for two open council seats. Council terms are four years. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Bill Stirling was mayor of Aspen for eight years from the mid 1980’s to the early 90’s. In one race, he decided to meet the public outdoors.

U.S. Ski Team/Tom Kelly

Cross-country skier Simi Hamilton is satisfied with his season so far. The Aspen native placed 12th in the World Championships in Sweden last month. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen sat down with him.

Hamilton will finish his final race of the season this weekend. During his season, Hamilton put together a video of the U.S. Cross Country team that went viral on the internet. Nearly 59,000 people have viewed it on YouTube. 

Warm temps wake bears from winter slumber

Mar 5, 2015
Ken Krehbiel

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is reporting a handful of rare black bear sightings in the heart of winter. Warm weather in January and February got a few bears up and moving, and looking for food. 

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