For decades the Aspen Valley Land Trust has kept open spaces in the Roaring Fork Valley from being developed. Now, the organization’s director is preparing to step down. Martha Cochran sat down with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen. She says the work AVLT has done to permanently preserve land is not just critical for views and historic land uses, like ranching, it’s important for wildlife.

Martha Cochran is executive director of Aspen Valley Land Trust. She’s stepping down at the end of the year, but intends to stay in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Creative Commons/Flickr/David Leo Veksler

The City of Aspen will target homes and neighborhoods in a push to reduce its carbon footprint. The latest inventory of pollutants shows Aspen is falling behind in meeting goals to reduce emissions. 

Since 2004, greenhouse gas emissions in Aspen have dropped by 7.4 percent. Ashley Perl is with the City’s Canary Initiative that tracks this data.

"That’s no small task for our town because we’ve been growing a lot and our economy has grown as well, and we’ve enjoyed a great quality of life while continuing to reduce emissions.”

The marijuana industry in Colorado got some attention at the Aspen Ideas Festival last week. Festival participants toured a grow operation near Basalt and heard from experts about the somewhat bumpy rollout of recreational pot. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

There’s a few rules before you take a tour of High Valley Farms near Basalt.

Marci Krivonen

An effort to make Aspen a “City of Wellbeing” is underway. The initiative is in its beginning stages, but would connect community agencies, organizations and businesses to fill gaps in mental and physical health in the valley. Local resident Gina Murdock is spearheading the idea.

"We have a lot of healthy, fit people. But on the other side, we have one of the highest suicide rates in our county, per capita. So, for me, that’s a red flag. It’s one of the reasons I’m leading this."

Screenshot, Holland & Hart LLP

A Florida development company wants to build a new Four Seasons Hotel near Aspen’s “S” curves, but there’s a major hurdle first. Miami-based Cisneros Real Estate wants to annex nearly seven acres of County land at the base of Shadow Mountain in a residential neighborhood.

Marci Krivonen

Health care, violence and the wage gap are a few topics to be tackled at this year’s Aspen Ideas Festival. The 10-day event started Thursday (6/25). 

It’s the Festival’s eleventh year and this year it looks different.

"We decided to freshen it up a little bit and change some things around, and we’re sitting in a new pavilion," she says.

Jim Salter leaves his mark on Aspen

Jun 25, 2015

By all accounts, Jim Salter was one of the smartest people who spent time in Aspen, and he had the dogs to match.



"He also had the most intelligent dogs," says Bill Stirling is a long-time resident and former mayor of aspen. His late wife, Katharine Thalberg, founded Explore Bookstore, where Stirling met Salter. "They were corgis. They were very long and low to the ground and highly intelligent which would be just the kind of dog Jim would have. You could almost speak to those dogs and expect a pretty good reply from them."

Facebook/Protegete:Nuestro Aire, Nuestra Salud

The number of ethnic minorities involved in environmental organizations across the country is dismally low and it’s the same in the Roaring Fork Valley. Some statewide groups have noticed the problem and are creating programs for the Latino community. They say reaching this population is an important step toward reducing carbon emissions. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Dulce Saenz immigrated with her family to Colorado from Mexico when she was a toddler. She says she heard the term “carbon footprint” for the first time last year.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week. 

A news story about a missing Aspen native has created a  ruckus among longtime residents.

As summer sets in, so does the homeless population in Glenwood Springs, which is angst in the business community.

Meanwhile, a custody dispute involving a Snowmass Village father has garnered international attention.

When is a service dog a legitimate reason to take the pet into a restaurant or live in affordable housing?

Facebook/Pitkin Co. Open Space and Trails

Heavy rain Tuesday night boosted the Roaring Fork River in Aspen to flood stage. Minor flooding is possible in low-lying areas. 

Flows in the Aspen stretch of the Roaring Fork were nearly four times the typical amount Wednesday morning. Pitkin County Sheriff Joe Disalvo says people with homes in a floodplain should be prepared to sandbag and self-rescue if waters get too high.