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Attorney General Jeff Sessions

Updated at 6:25 p.m. ET

Attorney General Jeff Sessions told the House Judiciary Committee Tuesday that his "story has never changed" about his and other Trump campaign officials' connections to Russia.

"I will not accept, and reject accusations that I have ever lied," Sessions said. "That is a lie!"

Valley Roundup for Morning Edition, Aug. 11, 2017

Aug 10, 2017

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

 

Joining me this week are Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News. I’m Carolyn Sackariason and you are listening to Valley Roundup, an analysis and commentary of the week’s news with writers and editors. We continue our conversation with Jason Auslander, reporter for the Aspen Times, Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Springs Post Independent and Lorenzo Semple, columnist for the Aspen Daily News.

 

 

Architect of the Capitol

Over the past few months, we have brought you live coverage of major historic events happening in Washington. These include the Senate intelligence committee hearings with Attorney General Jeff Sessions and former FBI director James Comey.

Architect of the Capitol

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee at 2:30pm ET today, as the investigation continues into Russian attempts to influence the 2016 presidential election. 

The nation's top legal officer is set to go before Congress on Tuesday to try to defuse a bomb that the former FBI director dropped into his lap.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is scheduled to appear before the Senate Intelligence Committee less than one week after James Comey told the committee he could not discuss openly certain information about Sessions' recusal from the investigation into Russia's election meddling last year.

Pitkin County officials are still scratching their heads about why the federal government has threatened one of their funding sources.

Neighborly disputes are nothing new. There’s the dog next door that poops on your lawn. The house that throws loud backyard parties. The guy down the block who always plows through the stop sign.

But in Colorado, the introduction of legal, home-grown marijuana has elevated tension among neighbors to a whole new level.

Because of gaps in the state constitutional amendments that legalized cultivation of the drug for recreational and medical purposes -- and in the ensuing rules that sought to regulate it further -- some rural pockets in Colorado are seeing large-scale cooperative marijuana grow operations sprout up with little oversight.