Basalt

At a special meeting on Tuesday night, Basalt’s town council hired its second interim town manager in four months.

Aspen Public Radio News

David Myler is an attorney in Basalt; he and his partner, Bill Lamont, are currently looking into creating a regional housing authority for the Roaring Fork Valley.

 

On this week’s Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Wyatt Orme present a compilation of the week’s news.

Aspen Public Radio News

At Valley Meats in Carbondale, four men sit on their lunch break in complete silence, starting at their phones. The valley’s only local, Spanish-language radio station plays in the background: La Tricolor, 107.1.

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Elected officials have approved the purchase of $7 million worth of conservation easements and land in Pitkin County.

Basalt joined forces with Aspen, Snowmass and Pitkin County this week in hiring an attorney to negotiate “franchise agreements” with Comcast.

Officials broke ground Tuesday in Basalt for the Roaring Fork Apartments. The project will provide affordable housing, unlike anything else in the valley.

County officials across Colorado are busily inspecting the size, quality, and whatever else is considered in determining property values. This happens every odd year.

Yesterday, the Basalt Town Council voted unanimously for a property tax, but they decided to hold off on the decision to pay town employees more.

Elizabeth Stewart Severy, Aspen Public Radio News

Unofficial results indicate that Basalt voters narrowly rejected ballot questions related to buying the former Pan and Fork mobile home parcel. Tuesday night results show that about 52 percent of voters said “no” to the town buying the land to build a park, and about 55 percent voted against park-related improvements.

Basalt’s interim town manager will continue to serve until elected officials can find somebody else.

Elise Fitzsimmons/Aspen Public Radio

Most everyone in the Roaring Fork Valley and beyond should have received their ballots by now. The Aspen Public Radio news team has answers about the logistics of voting in this mail-in election.

Aspen Public Radio News

Basalt has three questions related to parks, open space and trails on November’s ballot, two of which are connected to each other and one that stands on its own.   

Ideological differences were clear last night in a debate over the future of Basalt’s Pan and Fork property.

The Arts Campus at Willits in Basalt had a summer full of ups and downs. The group hired its first managing director, Ryan Honey, but also faced lots of drama surrounding its budget and future funding.

www.basalt.net

  Ted Guy, of Basalt, filed a lawsuit on Wednesday against the town government for not being transparent enough. Guy is suing Basalt’s mayor, the town clerk and all five council members.

 

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

The Wheeler Real Estate Transfer Tax, and the multiple questions in Basalt about the Pan and Fork land parcel, will both have effects on art-focused nonprofits. Aspen Public Radio’s Patrick Fort spoke with Gena Buhler from the Wheeler Opera House and Genna Moe from The Art Base to see how each would be affected by November’s votes.

The legal bills are mounting in the town of Basalt after a tumultuous year for the municipality.

 

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

  Genna Moe has been a mainstay in the Roaring Fork Valley arts community for almost ten years. She ran children’s programs at the Aspen Art Museum. She worked at the Wheeler Opera House.

 Lisa Singer’s interpretations of stormy weather are on display at the Art Base in Basalt starting Friday. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Patrick Fort about what creating these paintings does for her state of mind.

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