Basalt

Marci Krivonen

Next week voters in the sprawling, mid-valley Crown Mountain Park and Recreation District will head to the polls. Four people are running for three open seats on the board of directors. Three of them are incumbents and the fourth jumped in after voters turned down a proposal last fall, to build a recreation center. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

It’s a cloudy, chilly day as Ted Bristol drives me through the 130-acre Crown Mountain Park in El Jebel. Despite the light snowfall, some bundled-up dog waters are braving the cold.

Marci Krivonen

If you’ve driven through downtown Basalt recently, it’s hard to miss the mess of trees, electrical boxes and garbage covering a central stretch of land. It’s the site of the old Pan and Fork Mobile Home park, where more than 300 people used to live. The Town of Basalt helped those residents relocate and now it’s focusing on redeveloping the five acres. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen walked through the area with Town Manager Mike Scanlon.

http://www.flyfishingconnection.com/

The Roaring Fork Conservancy is taking a look at what a healthy Fryingpan River means to the local economy. The Fryingpan Valley Economic Study is underway and will continue into next year according to the Basalt based organization. The group says the study aims to understand visitor use and spending related to recreational activities on the Lower Fryingpan River and Ruedi Reservoir, and the river’s economic importance. The final result will give people an idea of what a healthy river means to the local economy. The Conservancy believes the report will also aid in helping to keep the river healthy. Colorado State University and Colorado Mountain College are assisting with the study that is funded in part by the town of Basalt, Eagle County, the Aspen Skiing Company Environment Foundation and other private donors. Over a decade ago the Conservancy conducted a similar study and found the Fryingpan Valley's recreational activities contributed an estimated $1.8 million annually in total economic output to Basalt's economy. Updated numbers are expected to be greater.

www.ourtownplanning.org

The process of moving families out of Basalt’s Pan and Fork mobile home park is nearly complete. Just one family remains in the flood-prone neighborhood which will eventually become a public park. 

Since August, officials from the Town of Basalt have been working with families in the 38 homes, to help them find new housing. The Town purchased part of the trailer park in 2011 so it could redevelop it. Town Manager Mike Scanlon says more than 380 people were living in the park.

Marci Krivonen

Issues like economic recovery, marijuana and affordable housing were discussed at a candidate forum in Basalt Monday night. The candidates are vying for open seats on Basalt’s Town Council.  Four of the five registered candidates participated. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen was there and filed this report.

www.basalt.net

Basalt’s municipal election is about one week away and five candidates are vying for three open seats on the Town board. One of the biggest issues is business. While downtown stores struggle, the new urban Willits area is busy. Mike Scanlon is Basalt’s Town Manager.

www.ourtownplanning.org

The Town of Basalt’s halfway through its unconventional urban planning process. In February, Town officials invited residents to participate in what they’re calling the “Our Town” process, where they lay out a map of downtown and ask people what they’d like to see there. So far, more than 300 people have offered up ideas. They’re zeroing in on a 12 acre chunk of public-private land that runs from Old Pond Park to Basalt Grocery and the Aspenalt Lodge. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke to Basalt Town Manager Mike Scanlon.

Rocky Mountain Institute

The non profit Rocky Mountain Institute is moving forward with plans to build an “Innovation Center” in downtown Basalt. The organization submitted a sketch plan to Town Council last month and if council supports it, construction could start in the fall. RMI specializes in sustainability and energy efficiency and the structure near the Roaring Fork River, will be highly efficient. The $15 million building will be double the size of the group’s current headquarters in Old Snowmass.

Town of Basalt

Even though snow is ankle deep and winter’s far from over, gardeners in Basalt are gearing up for spring. This year, it’ll be hard to miss a new project just off Highway 82. A Town park will be transformed into a food forest or, an edible, urban garden. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains.

"We are ready to go!"

Lisa DiNardo is the Town of Basalt’s Horticulturist. She’s in charge of beautifying Basalt’s public spaces and this year, there’s a new challenge: a food forest bordering the round-about at the entrance to Old Town.

With just eight days until the Olympics start in Sochi...the Aspen community sends off four local athletes who will compete.

Health care prices in the Valley have been rising for years. Now, a handful of local employers are trying to improve worker’s health--and bring down costs.

Basalt’s setting a path for its future...in a non-traditional way. It’s using a method called “crowd-sourcing” to gather input on urban planning.

A new group in Aspen wants to make it easier for young people to stay in Aspen. City council approved the Next Generation Advisory Commission this week.

And, as Colorado’s population grows, the state’s water supply can’t keep up. A Basalt organization is involved in a statewide water plan.

Terrain parks are ubiquitous at ski resorts around the country. Now, there’s an effort to make them safer.

Finally, Aspen’s Torin Yater-Wallace is heading to the Olympics. The freeskier is recovering from injuries...but, says he’s ready to compete.

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