Books

Marci Krivonen

All this week volunteers and staff at the Pitkin County Library have been boxing up books and hauling them to a new location. For the next several months, the library will operate out of the former Aspen Art Museum, or old power house. The move allows construction on the library building. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen caught up with head librarian Kathy Chandler mid-move.

Charles Baxter is the author of five novels, five short story collections, three collections of poetry and two essay collections on fiction.  His novel The Feast of Love was nominated for a National Book Award.  His most recent story collection is called There’s Something I Want You to Do.  Baxter lives in Minneapolis and teaches at the University of Minnesota and in the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.  www.charlesbaxter.com.

Kevin Morris has written for The Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times and Filmmaker Magazine. He is the co-producer of the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical, “The Book of Mormon,” and producer of the classic documentary film, “Hands on a Hardbody.”

He is also the founding and managing partner of the entertainment law firm Morris, Yorn, et al., which specializes in representing actors, writers, and directors in the motion picture and television industries. He lives with his wife and two children in Los Angeles. This is his first collection of fiction. www.kevinmorrisauthor.com

Lily King grew up in Massachusetts and received her B.A. in English Literature from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and her M.A. in Creative Writing from Syracuse University. Her novels include The Pleasing Hour, Father of the Rain, and Euphoria. Her work has won various awards including a New York Times Notable Book award, and a Kirkus Award for Fiction. Euphoria won the New England Book Award for Fiction 2014 and was a finalist in the National Book Critics Circle Awards. Euphoria was named one of the 10 Best Books of 2014 by The New York Times Book Review.

David Shankbone

Edwidge Danticat was born in Haiti in 1969 and came to the United States when she was twelve years old. She graduated from Barnard College and received an M.F.A. from Brown University. She writes fiction, memoir, non-fiction and essays. Her books include Breath, Eyes Memory, Krik? Krak!, The Farming of Bones, Brother, I’m Dying, The Dew Breaker, Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work and her latest novel Claire of the Sea Light. She is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, was awarded the American Book Award for The Farming of Bones. Both Krik? Krak! and Brother, I’m Dying received National Book Award Nominations and Brother, I’m Dying won a National Book Critics Circle Award. She lives in Miami with her family.

Doug Phelps is president of the board of directors for an organization that recently purchased Explore Booksellers. Public Interest Network saved the venerable bookstore from closing when it bought the Main Street property for $4.6 million. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason.

More about Explore Booksellers: http://www.explorebooksellers.com/

Dinaw Mengestu was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in 1978. He is the recipient of a fellowship in fiction from the New York Foundation for the Arts and a Lannan Literary Award, and received a "5 under 35" Award from the National Book Foundation. His first novel, The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, was named a New York Times Notable Book and awarded the Guardian First Book Award and the Los Angeles Times Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, among numerous other honors. His latest novel is called All Of Our Names.

 

Edward Carey

Elizabeth McCracken is the author of five books: Here’s Your Hat What’s Your Hurry (stories), the novels The Giant’s House and Niagara Falls All Over Again, the memoir An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination, and the forthcoming Thunderstruck & Other Stories.  She’s received grants and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Liguria Study Center, the American Academy in Berlin, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

She has taught creative writing at Western Michigan University, the University of Oregon, the University of Houston, and the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop.  She holds the James A. Michener Chair in Fiction at the University of Texas, Austin, and boy are her arms tired.

Ilana Panich-Lisman

Jennifer duBois is the recipient of a 2013 Whiting Writer’s Award and a 2012 National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 award. Her debut novel, A Partial History of Lost Causes, was the winner of the California Book Award for First Fiction and the Northern California Book Award for Fiction, and was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Prize for Debut Fiction. Her second novel, Cartwheel, has been nominated for a New York Public Library Young Lions Award. Jennifer earned a B.A. in political science and philosophy from Tufts University and an M.F.A. in fiction from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop before completing a Stegner Fellowship at Stanford University. Her writing has appeared in such publications as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Playboy, The Missouri Review, Salon, The Kenyon Review, Cosmopolitan, Narrative, and ZYZZYVA. A native of western Massachusetts, Jennifer currently teaches in the MFA program at Texas State University.

Debbi Cooper

Molly Antopol’s debut story collection, The UnAmericans (W.W. Norton), was longlisted for the 2014 National Book Award, named a finalist for the Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers Award, the New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award, the National Jewish Book Award and the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature, and was a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 honoree. It was chosen as a “Best Book of 2014” by over a dozen venues and will be published in seven countries. She teaches at Stanford University, where she was a Wallace Stegner Fellow, and lives in San Francisco.

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