Castle Creek valley

Brent Gardner-Smith/Aspen Journalism

City of Aspen staff is working to understand and prepare for future water needs. Part of that could mean a reservoir to store municipal water. The city also faces opposition from environmental groups and private landowners in state water court over its rights to build dams on Castle and Maroon Creeks.

Brent Gardner-Smith / Aspen Journalism

Aspen City Council hopes to get voter approval to buy land for municipal water storage, and they’ll discuss a ballot question Monday night.

 

Courtesy of Brent Gardner-Smith/Aspen Journalism

Last month the City of Aspen announced plans to buy about 60 acres of land in Woody Creek that would be used for a reservoir in the future. It’s part of the city’s work to explore options other than using water rights to build reservoirs on Castle and Maroon Creeks. Environment reporter Elizabeth Stewart-Severy has been reporting on the issue and talked with producer Christin Kay about the latest developments.

Brent Gardner-Smith / Aspen Journalism

As the City of Aspen is poised to purchase land that could be used as a reservoir, city council heard about the need for such water storage.

Courtesy of City of Aspen

As it faces opposition to its water rights to build dams on Castle and Maroon creeks, the City of Aspen is now is under contract to buy land as an alternative site for a reservoir.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

City of Aspen voters will elect a mayor and two council seats next month. Some locals are pushing for new blood on council, largely because of the current council’s vote to hold on to water rights to build dams on Castle and Maroon creeks. Elizabeth Stewart-Severy has been following the issue and is here to give us an update.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio News

Jay Parker knows his way around Aspen’s mine tunnels. He’s spent about 40 years working at the Smuggler Mine. On a recent tour, he added consideration of water storage to the history and geology that he provides.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

The City of Aspen is working to retain conditional water rights to build reservoirs on Maroon and Castle Creeks, and the court battle could get expensive.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

The last day to formally challenge the City of Aspen’s conditional water rights on Maroon and Castle creeks was Dec. 31. At least 10 people and organizations are opposing the city in court.

American Rivers

The City of Aspen has filed to keep conditional water rights on Castle and Maroon creeks because, council members say, the town may one day need water storage. The national advocacy group American Rivers plans to be one of several organizations that will oppose the city in water court.

Aspen Public Radio News

Pitkin County commissioners voted Tuesday to oppose the City of Aspen’s claim to conditional water rights on Maroon and Castle creeks.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

Earlier this fall, Aspen City Council heard loud and clear that residents don’t want to see dams on Castle or Maroon creeks, and then filed to keep the rights to build reservoirs there anyway. Now the city is making good on its promise to explore other options.

Courtesy of demography.dola.colorado.gov

As the national conversation about climate change heats up, the City of Aspen is turning its eye toward planning for a warmer, drier future. Aspen and other resort towns face a unique challenge in predicting just how many people might be living here in decades to come.  

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

Aspen City Council voted unanimously last night to keep the water rights to build reservoirs on Maroon and Castle creeks. The vote comes despite public opposition.

Brent Gardner-Smith/Aspen Journalism

City of Aspen staff is directing council to keep water rights for reservoirs on Castle and Maroon Creeks. As Elizabeth Stewart-Severy reports, this goes against public sentiment.

Aspen Public Radio News

The City of Aspen hosted an open-house discussion last week about its water rights to build reservoirs on Maroon and Castle creeks, but interested locals still have a lot of questions.

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

The City of Aspen is holding a public open house today to discuss its conditional water rights on Castle and Maroon Creeks.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

A lawsuit that the town of Basalt filed against one of its citizens has been thrown out of court by a judge.

Judge dismisses Basalt lawsuit over open records request

Marci Krivonen

The Castle Creek valley just outside of Aspen is becoming increasingly popular to recreationists like hikers and cyclists. Pitkin County and the White River National Forest are taking comments from the public on how to best manage the area.