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Another development application has been submitted for a downtown building in Aspen. Already five projects have been turned into the city in advance of tomorrow’s election when a change in the charter amendment could affect projects getting approval. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.    

Downtown landlord Mark Hunt is under contract to purchase the old Guido’s Swiss Inn, as well as the structure next to it, known as the Salmon building because of its color. Both are on the Cooper Avenue Mall.

Aspen City Council is getting up to speed on a time limit for how long the municipal government has to review government development projects. The city's planning department is recommending Aspen follow a mandatory 60 day time limit for ruling on a municipal development proposal. That's according to state law.

Roger Adams

Steve Skadron is hoping to hang on to the mayor’s seat in Aspen. He has one challenger in the May election but says his proven leadership will earn him votes. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Skadron has served two terms on council. This would be his second term as mayor. He runs a marketing business and has lived in town for two decades. He says he’s pursuing re-election as a commitment to public service.

Carolyn Sackariason

The smells of legalization are emanating across an alley and into the homes of Aspen residents, prompting city officials to take action. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has the details.

The marijuana dermal patch manufacturer Meachum and Company, which produces its product under the trade name, RX Green, was paid a visit by three Aspen city officials last week after neighbors complained of strong pot odors wafting up from its basement shop.

Roger Adams

The race for mayor in Aspen has become more heated as election day gets closer. Two people are running for the seat. Ballots will be counted May 5th. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen sat down with candidate Torre.

Torre isn’t a newcomer to city politics. He served eight years on council. This is his fifth attempt to become mayor. The tennis instructor has lived in town for two decades and says he’s running because he feels the public’s voice has been lost.

Grassroots TV

The candidates running for Aspen City Council and mayor were grilled Thursday night at the annual Squirm Night forum. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Affordable housing, development and the residency of one candidate came up during the two hour forum in council chambers. Editors from local newspapers grilled the seven people running for two open seats on council.

One question asked the candidates to grade the City Manager’s Office. Retired affordable housing director Tom McCabe and former mayor Mick Ireland:

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The candidates running in Aspen’s spring election are already raising thousands of dollars in the race for elected office. The first of three campaign finance reports was filed Tuesday.

Construction in and around Mill Street may have let up a bit but there is still plenty of work that will continue in the coming weeks. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason talked with Jack Wheeler, the city’s capital asset manager, and has the details.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

Glenwood Springs has two new council members.

It looks like the Thompson Divide will be safe from oil and gas drilling. But, what about other areas and how do residents there feel about that sort of activity in their backyards?

There’s movement and millions of dollars in play in getting a base village built at the base of Snowmass ski area.

Meanwhile, a new executive director has been hired at the Wheeler Opera House.

And, an Aspen City Council candidate is being scrutinized for something he did 10 years ago.

Joining me this week are Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, Jill Bethard, editor of the Snowmass Sun, Randy Essex, editor of the Glenwood Post Independent and Michael Miracle, editor of Aspen Sojourner magazine.

Marci Krivonen

It’s that time of year...when the weather’s freeze-thaw pattern causes deep caverns to form on city streets and state highways. Potholes are ubiquitous almost everywhere but in the high country, the weather’s more extreme so the roads are ripe for ripping open. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

It’s the morning rush hour on West Main Street in Aspen. Buses, cars and construction vehicles stream into town.

Reporter: "So this is the problem area?"

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