city of aspen

Your Morning News - December 16th, 2014

Dec 16, 2014

Aspen Planners Consider Mark Hunt Proposal on Lodging

Planning officials in Aspen are considering whether to allow certain exceptions for one of the development projects Mark Hunt is involved with. The Chicago businessman has purchased more than a dozen properties in town in recent years.

The project would be built on Main Street, where a Conoco gas station is now. Aspen’s planning and zoning commission is reviewing a laundry list of exceptions that Hunt is asking for. Aspen Senior planner Sara Adams says one is canceling what’s called impact fees.

“So that comes to a total of about $91,400, roughly, in impact fees.”

Hunt is also requesting a height increase, more than doubling the amount of floor space, eliminating the required two to three affordable housing units while leasing more than twenty parking spaces in the Rio Grande Parking Plaza rather than building more parking for guests.

The proposed building would be three stories tall with a gable roof and a rooftop deck. The rooms would be on the smaller side. Hunt has said the effort is to boost the affordable lodging in Aspen. Again, city planner Sara Adams

“First floor is retail, restaurant, lodge lobby. Second and third floor are all lodge rooms. You know a hundred and seventy to a hundred and eighty square feet, average size, bunk beds.”

In the basement there would be amenities like a bar and a Turkish steam bath. The proposal is goes before the Planning and Zoning Commission tonight. Members will decide what recommendations to make to City Council which will consider the proposal. Another Hunt development that’s very similar will be considered in January.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week the White River National Forest released an oil and gas plan. But, does that settle the matter on drilling in the Thompson Divide?

The City of Aspen continues to refine a new lodging incentives ordinance. At the same time, the council is asking the city management to give them better information.

The State of Colorado is not messing around when it comes to regulations and medical pot shops.

Could Aspen’s Little Annie’s return from the grave… again?

Your Evening News - December 11th, 2014

Dec 11, 2014

Aspen Seeks Input on New Bike/Pedestrian Plan

The City of Aspen is updating its Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan and seeking public input. When the plan was conceived 20 years ago, several new trails were the result.

The original plan led to improvements like trail connections and new trails such as the East of Aspen trail and the Ute Avenue Trail. A lot has changed since the original master plan was drawn up, says City of Aspen Senior Project Manager Tyler Christoff. He says it’s time for a revision.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a look at the week’s news with various writers and editors in the valley.

This week the Aspen City Council decided on a new plan to increase the number of lodging beds in town. But, is anyone happy with the plan?

It looks like the economy has recovered as there is very little vacancy in the commercial core of Aspen.

Does Pitkin County need bigger bike lanes? We might just get them.

A local service man, Captain William H. DuBois is being remembered.

Glenwood Springs wants to get tough on unlocked trash.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Aspen City Council decides to take up lodging incentives again-- but much more cautiously.

Garfield County Commissioners suggest alternate routes for energy companies to reach leases on the contested Thompson Divide.

And the Glenwood Springs Police Department aims to crack down on people who don’t lock up their trash from bears.

The USA Pro Challenge announces Aspen will be included again in its route for 2015, only this time it won’t be the start.

Valley Roundup - October 31st, 2014

Oct 31, 2014

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week - getting citizens behind urban planning.  In Basalt, angry pro-development residents hammer town council.

In Aspen, the city tries citizen surveys to move on a lodging incentive package.

There is a big drug bust mid-valley with more arrest to come.  And for the now legal drug, more marijuana grow operations approved in Missouri Heights.

Also this week Sam Wyly says he is bankrupt.

And on the Download with Rob St. Mary, a look at online election information.

Valley Roundup - October 3rd, 2014

Oct 3, 2014

Welcome to Valley Roundup a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week  - Aspen’s parking debacle forces the department’s director out as internal emails on the scam are released.

The owners of an Aspen penthouse are back in court.  This time its about the building’s front door which they say is for their use only.

Also this week two hotels announce big redevelopment plans.

And, prosecuting the Aspen art museum climbers

Loopnet.com

This week, the city of Aspen is going toe to toe with a developer and townhouse owners, over access to a building downtown. The City requires builders to make sure they provide access for affordable housing tenants and people with disabilities. Now, town attorneys are arguing in court the developer JW Ventures and two of their condo owners failed those mandates…. by letting the condo owners keep everyone else from using the main entrance.

Valley Roundup - August 29th, 2014

Aug 29, 2014

Welcome to Valley Roundup a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week  - Aspen City Council dumps its much despised lodging incentive ordinance that would allow giant hotels and cut affordable housing. 

Glenwood residents get ready to vent about the Grand Avenue Bridge

Also this week, the tortoises head for a warmer spot as the Aspen Art Museum gets worldwide publicity

And, on the download, computer devices edge out clothes as must haves for students this year.

Marci Krivonen

When it comes to how to regulate recreational marijuana, there are more questions than answers. That was the conclusion at a Pitkin County Commissioner’s meeting Tuesday, where officials discussed public safety and environmental health surrounding pot. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

It’s been nearly nine months since recreational marijuana shops in Colorado started selling pot to adults 21 and older. Now, Pitkin County is examining problems and concerns that have cropped up.

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