city of aspen

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On Thursday, City of Aspen and Pitkin County staff took water and sediment samples at Grizzly Reservoir following discoloration of the Roaring Fork River. The work follows concerns from elected leaders.

The crystal clear water turned brown early this week after a dam problem forced the release of muddy water from Grizzly Reservoir. Between 10 and 20 acre feet flowed from Lincoln Creek into the Roaring Fork River.

Bank looks to foreclose on Ute building on Hopkins Avenue

Aug 12, 2015
Carolyn Sackriason

  Foreclosure proceedings have begun on a high-profile building in downtown Aspen. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has the details.


Alpine Bank has started foreclosure proceedings against the owners of a downtown Aspen building that has been the subject of several lawsuits, including one brought by the city government.


Valley Roundup - August 7, 2015

Aug 7, 2015

The sheriffs on both ends of the valley are crying foul over having to foot the bill for Hillary Clinton’s recent visit.

Marci Krivonen

An Aspen-area farm is taking cues from the “mecca” of sustainable agriculture. Joel Salatin runs the Polyface Farm in Virginia. Many agricultural operations have duplicated his practices, including Aspen TREE at Cozy Point Ranch. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Aspen TREE runs a relatively small farm and ranch in a rural area. But, it doesn’t always sound rural.

Aspen City Council Tuesday agreed not to purchase commercial spaces and affordable housing units in a historic downtown building. 

The City has a “right of first refusal” for units in the ISIS building, where Aspen’s movie theater operates. A buyer has offered $10.4 million for two retail spaces and a pair of affordable housing units, but not the theater. The deal requires keeping the residential units affordable.

Valley Roundup 7-13-15

Jul 31, 2015

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason

Joining me this week are Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, Randy Essex, editor of the Glenwood Post Independent, Andy Stone, columnist and former editor of the Aspen Times and Michael Miracle, editor of Aspen Sojourner magazine.

Aspen residents continue to take their town back by slowing growth and development in their own grassroots way. It’s anyone’s guess how elected officials will respond.

Creative Commons/Flickr/mariordo59

The City of Aspen is looking to plug in an effort to decrease its carbon footprint. 

Last year nineteen percent of Aspen’s greenhouse gas emissions came from vehicles and buses moving, sometimes crawling, through town. Tyler Svitak with the Denver group Clean Cities Coalition did a study. He told city council Tuesday it recommends plug-in electric cars to replace aging city vehicles and...

A significant chunk of workers in Aspen have high blood pressure.That’s according to data from health fairs last fall, coordinated by the five biggest employers in the Upper Roaring Fork Valley. They’re part of the Valley Health Alliance, a new nonprofit aimed at improving health in the Upper Valley.

Marci Krivonen

To make way for a new home in Aspen’s west end neighborhood, the property owner recently cut down several trees. That kind of removal must pass muster with the City of Aspen, which considers the trees in town a “community forest.” Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with city forester Ben Carlsen about when removing a tree is permitted.

Ben Carlsen is the City of Aspen Forester. He says the tree mitigation costs for the home on Aspen Street reached nearly $40,000.

Carolyn Sackariason

  Aspen has city rules preventing employees and elected officials from accepting certain kinds of gifts. At the same time, employees accept expensive passes to one of the biggest events of the summer.