city of aspen

Pro cycling race will close Independence Pass

Aug 17, 2015
Facebook/USA Pro Challenge

The biggest impact to local traffic this week from the USA Pro Challenge will be on Independence Pass.

The professional cyclists will arrive in Aspen Wednesday (8/19) via Independence Pass. They’ll leave town the next day, on Thursday (8/20), headed to Breckenridge in stage four of the race.

This is the fifth year the riders will move through Aspen. The race always brings traffic disruptions.

Twitter @IamMBB

On Thursday, City of Aspen and Pitkin County staff took water and sediment samples at Grizzly Reservoir following discoloration of the Roaring Fork River. The work follows concerns from elected leaders.

The crystal clear water turned brown early this week after a dam problem forced the release of muddy water from Grizzly Reservoir. Between 10 and 20 acre feet flowed from Lincoln Creek into the Roaring Fork River.

Bank looks to foreclose on Ute building on Hopkins Avenue

Aug 12, 2015
Carolyn Sackriason

  Foreclosure proceedings have begun on a high-profile building in downtown Aspen. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has the details.

 

Alpine Bank has started foreclosure proceedings against the owners of a downtown Aspen building that has been the subject of several lawsuits, including one brought by the city government.

 

Valley Roundup - August 7, 2015

Aug 7, 2015

The sheriffs on both ends of the valley are crying foul over having to foot the bill for Hillary Clinton’s recent visit.

Marci Krivonen

An Aspen-area farm is taking cues from the “mecca” of sustainable agriculture. Joel Salatin runs the Polyface Farm in Virginia. Many agricultural operations have duplicated his practices, including Aspen TREE at Cozy Point Ranch. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Aspen TREE runs a relatively small farm and ranch in a rural area. But, it doesn’t always sound rural.

metrotheatres.com

Aspen City Council Tuesday agreed not to purchase commercial spaces and affordable housing units in a historic downtown building. 

The City has a “right of first refusal” for units in the ISIS building, where Aspen’s movie theater operates. A buyer has offered $10.4 million for two retail spaces and a pair of affordable housing units, but not the theater. The deal requires keeping the residential units affordable.

Valley Roundup 7-13-15

Jul 31, 2015

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason

Joining me this week are Curtis Wackerle, editor of the Aspen Daily News, Randy Essex, editor of the Glenwood Post Independent, Andy Stone, columnist and former editor of the Aspen Times and Michael Miracle, editor of Aspen Sojourner magazine.

Aspen residents continue to take their town back by slowing growth and development in their own grassroots way. It’s anyone’s guess how elected officials will respond.

Creative Commons/Flickr/mariordo59

The City of Aspen is looking to plug in an effort to decrease its carbon footprint. 

Last year nineteen percent of Aspen’s greenhouse gas emissions came from vehicles and buses moving, sometimes crawling, through town. Tyler Svitak with the Denver group Clean Cities Coalition did a study. He told city council Tuesday it recommends plug-in electric cars to replace aging city vehicles and...

A significant chunk of workers in Aspen have high blood pressure.That’s according to data from health fairs last fall, coordinated by the five biggest employers in the Upper Roaring Fork Valley. They’re part of the Valley Health Alliance, a new nonprofit aimed at improving health in the Upper Valley.

Marci Krivonen

To make way for a new home in Aspen’s west end neighborhood, the property owner recently cut down several trees. That kind of removal must pass muster with the City of Aspen, which considers the trees in town a “community forest.” Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with city forester Ben Carlsen about when removing a tree is permitted.

Ben Carlsen is the City of Aspen Forester. He says the tree mitigation costs for the home on Aspen Street reached nearly $40,000.

Carolyn Sackariason

  Aspen has city rules preventing employees and elected officials from accepting certain kinds of gifts. At the same time, employees accept expensive passes to one of the biggest events of the summer.

Marci Krivonen

A study is underway in the upper valley (Aspen/Pitkin County) to see what people are tossing in the trash. It’s a dirty job, but the goal is to find ways to get more people to recycle and extend the life of the Pitkin County landfill. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

A front loader dumps bags of trash onto a tarp at the Pitkin County landfill. It’s garbage from households and businesses from Carbondale to Aspen.

Nearby a group of ten workers in white safety suits is picking through the trash.

Marci Krivonen

In Aspen’s busy summer season, about 1500 vehicles move through downtown intersections each day. To make streets safer, city council made it a priority, creating the “Rethink the Streets” program. It includes a temporary project at the corner of Galena and Hopkins. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen met City Engineer Trish Aragon there. Here's their interview:

Trish Aragon is City Engineer in Aspen. The city is holding an ice cream chat to take feedback on the downtown street project Wednesday afternoon, starting at 4 pm outside of city hall.

City of Aspen hires new parking director

Jun 17, 2015

  After an extensive search, the city of Aspen has hired a new parking director. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has more.

 

Plan aims to conserve water across Roaring Fork Valley

Jun 16, 2015
Facebook/Roaring Fork Conservancy

It’s hard to think of conserving water when rivers and streams are swollen with spring runoff...but, city of Aspen officials are mulling how to prepare for a drier future. 

Aspen is one of five communities involved in a regional water conservation effort. Organizers say the efficiency plan is the first of its kind in the state to encompass an entire watershed. Mark Fuller is executive director of the Ruedi Water and Power Authority.

"The idea is to reduce future municipal demands and it’s part of an overall watershed effort to increase streamflows," he says.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the Roaring Fork Valley in the past week. 

A couple that lives in a penthouse in downtown Aspen now has to share the building’s entrance with their neighbors. As a result, their property value decreased $1.3 million, a judge has ruled.

There’s more debate around the live debate that Aspen Public Radio broadcast with city council candidates Bert Myrin and Mick Ireland.

Penthouse owners and worker bees to use same door

May 18, 2015
Carolyn Sackariason

  Three Aspen residents are finally able to use the front door to get to their apartments in a downtown building, after a judge ruled the condo owners above them have no right to deny them access. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

Pitkin County District Court Judge Gail Nichols released a 90-page ruling Friday. It found JW Ventures, the developer of the building on E. Hopkins Ave., unlawfully represented to Michael Sedoy and Natalia Shvachko that they would have exclusive use of the east door and elevator to their two-story penthouse.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week. 

Aspen High School principal Kim Martin resigned after only three years on the job.

More complaints are surfacing about the proliferation of pot shops in family friendly Glenwood Springs weed.

Meanwhile, a major commercial development proposal for one of the last big open space in the valley has been pulled by the developer.

And, with summer comes traffic. Residents in the West End neighborhood of Aspen say keep it on Main Street and not on theirs.

Mountain Edition - May 14th, 2015

May 14, 2015

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

The embattled principal of Aspen High School announces her resignation.

A tax in Aspen is generating an extra $2 million annually. The public is getting a chance to decide how to spend it.

Finding affordable housing is always a challenge, but right now, Mid-Valley residents are facing significant hurdles.

A mentoring organization is seeking men, especially in Basalt and Carbondale.

And, a Carbondale resident is in the middle of Nepal’s aid effort. We talk to him about the latest earthquake to hit the area.

The City of Aspen is finding itself with an extra $2 million every year from what’s called the real estate transfer tax, or RETT. And Aspen residents will have an opportunity in the coming months to weigh in on how to spend it. Then next year they’ll be asked to vote to renew the revenue stream and where it should be spent. Right now it’s dedicated to the Wheeler Opera House. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason talked with City Manager Steve Barwick about the possibilities.

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