city of aspen

www.aspenmod.com

The City of Aspen launched a new website this week highlighting “modern era” local architecture. The 73 properties featured on the site were built post World War Two, mainly between the 1940s and 1970s. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

The mid-20th century was when Aspen went from being a quiet mountain town to an internationally known resort and the changes are reflected in the area’s architecture. Amy Simon is the Historic Preservation Officer with the City of Aspen.  

A new report says there isn’t enough natural gas in the Thompson Divide to make it worth drilling. But the industry argues there aren’t enough facts to say if the leases would be a bust…

A new marijuana task force is meeting for the first time today. The goal is to monitor the effects of recreational pot on the Roaring Fork Valley.

The City of Aspen’s utility wants to run on 100-percent renewable energy and its enlisted the help of a government laboratory to help them get there. Aspen will inch closer to its renewable goal when it starts taking power from a new hydro plant in Ridgway later this month.

Local teenagers are getting a lesson on slam poetry. Two performance artists are visiting schools this week, teaching kids how to write and deliver “spoken word” poetry.

Finally, a Durango biathlete is competing in Sochi tomorrow. Her story is a unique one - she owes her Olympic bid to her twin sister.

www.nrel.gov

The City of Aspen is working with an outside agency to come up solutions on how to meet their renewable energy goal. The City’s utility wants to be completely renewable by 2015. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, the City is working with NREL, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to come up with solutions. And, the controversial Castle Creek hydro plant is still in the cards.

Marci Krivonen

Aspen’s sending four athletes to the Olympics in Sochi, Russia and the community gathered Wednesday, to send them off. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen was at the event at the Gondola Plaza. She filed this report.

"Welcome to our 2014 Sochi Winter Olympic send-off for our local Olympians!"

Chris Klug, a three-time Olympian, hosted the ceremony. A sizable crowd gathered under light snow while Klug introduced the four Olympic athletes.

"We extend sincere congratulations to Jeremy Abbott, Simi Hamilton, Noah Hoffman and Torin Yater-Wallace," he said.

Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Pitkin County is leading an effort to explore the development of new trails in the Upper Valley. At issue is whether new trails are needed for users like mountain bikers, hikers and equestrians. The effort is also meant to stop illegal trails from being built.

The County is focusing on a 125,000 acre swath of public land that covers areas from Woody Creek to Independence Pass, and acreage in between.

Gary Tennenbaum with Pitkin County Open Space and Trails said the Upper Roaring Fork Trails Plan will guide trail planning for the next 10 to 20 years.

The first purchases of recreational marijuana in the Roaring Fork Valley happened this week. People lined up outside the Doctor’s Garden in Carbondale on Wednesday.

While weed becomes legal for adults 21 and older, parents are worried about the effects retail pot might have on teenagers, if it gets into their hands.

A trial in Aspen this week leads to an acquittal for a brew pub in Aspen. The Aspen Brewing Company was cited for noise violations.

Rainbow flags along Aspen’s streets mark Gay Ski Week in Aspen. This year, there are more participants than ever before. And, a group ceremony for civil unions will wrap up festivities.

As ski equipment improves and people are skiing faster, ski resorts are working harder to educate people. Aspen-Snowmass is focusing on ski safety.

Finally, the U-S cross country team is doing well this season. And, some think there’s a chance the team could medal. That hasn’t happened for more than 30 years.

Rukes.com

This month’s Winter X Games will mean more road closures in Aspen than in previous years.  That's because the city wants to make way for music concerts downtown, in Wagner Park. Aspen is taking pains to make sure businesses and residents know what to expect…including a recent meeting at City Hall. 

 

Below is a transcript of Reporter Elise Thatcher's story:

Axwell: “Center of the Universe”

Today we hear from Aspen Mayor Steve Skadron about his vision for the resort town in the coming year. Then we dig through the Aspen Public Radio archives and listen to some of this year’s most interesting and thought-provoking local stories. One Glenwood Springs woman was caught in a dangerous financial trap. And, her problem is somewhat common in Colorado’s immigrant community. As habitat for the Greater Sage Grouse disappears across the West, federal officials are deciding how strong protections should be on some Colorado land. Local stakeholders are watching closely. And a snowboarding veteran is battling a major injury with the Olympic Games a little more than a month away.

Rob St. Mary

The City of Aspen started the Canary Initiative in 2005 with an eye to trimming the city’s greenhouse gas emissions by 30% by 2020. The city announced Wednesday it met the goal seven-years early.

“Well, we found out this year, to our great celebration, was that we actually achieved our goal this year. So, the City of Aspen reduced our greenhouse gas emissions by 30.7%.  So, that’s a huge accomplishment.”

If you’ve had your holiday lights for a while… especially if that’s more than a couple of years  … Pitkin County and the City of Aspen are hoping you’ll consider buying new, more energy efficient lights to put up over the coming weeks. It’s part of an effort to lower energy use in the Aspen area… and make some cash, too. APR’s Elise Thatcher has more.

Reporter:  Let’s get to the money first. Liz O’Connell is with the City of Aspen.

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