Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

Eagle County

Chris Lindley began his new job with Eagle County on May 1.

Mountain Edition - October 16th, 2014

Oct 16, 2014

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Hospitals in the Roaring Fork Valley are keeping an eye on how they should be prepared for Ebola cases.

New construction gears up in Basalt on two different projects.

There’s one contested Pitkin County Commissioners’ race this election. We hear from both candidates.

A poll of Latino voters shows this group is leaning toward Democratic candidates… but a large chunk believe that party may be taking them for granted.

Christopher Mullen/Glenwood Springs Post Independent

   Valley View Hospital issued a statement Thursday afternoon saying doctors are treating a number of patients with symptoms similar to a virus making the rounds in Denver.  Valley View Executive Director Stacey Gavrell released the statement, which says, quote: “While a number of patients have had respiratory symptoms that could be the EV-D68, they have not been confirmed.”

Centers for Disease Control

Health officials in the Roaring Fork Valley say they’re not worried about a severe respiratory illness making the rounds in Denver and other states. Doctors in Denver have treated thousands of patients, some of them confirmed cases of a rare virus called Enterovirus D68 (or EV-D68). 

As of Wednesday afternoon, representatives of Eagle and Pitkin counties said they were not aware of any cases.  Garfield County reported one case, but then said there wasn't enough information from Valley View Hospital to confirm. Requests to Valley View on Thursday were unanswered.

Marci Krivonen

On Thursday we told you about how the Aspen-based Valley Marijuana Council is working on educating people about retail pot. Today we’ll explain how the State of Colorado is using tax money from marijuana sales to create an education campaign of its own. The Colorado Department of Public Health is planning to roll out television commercials, radio spots and billboards early next year around how to use marijuana safely.

Marci Krivonen

A new survey from the Colorado Department of Public Health shows fewer high school students think using marijuana is risky. The data reflects perceptions before recreational pot sales started at stores around the state in January. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The Healthy Kids Colorado Survey shows the percentage of students who thought using marijuana was moderately or very dangerous declined from 58 percent in 2011 to 54 percent last year.