Colorado Mountain College

The season opener for Sopris Theatre Company at Colorado Mountain College is Tom Stoppard’s play “Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead.” It starts Friday.

Colorado Mountain College (CMC) wants to make up for diminishing revenue by tinkering with property taxes. Voters have the final say this November.

Graphic: Aspen Art Museum

On Thursday, the Aspen Art Museum will host The Great Debate, a forum where presenters will confront one of the most fundamental questions of contemporary art.

Voter’s within Colorado Mountain College’s (CMC) tax district will be asked to weigh in on the institution’s finances this fall.

Courtesy of Colorado Mountain College

Glenwood Springs resident Carrie Hauser has been appointed by the governor to serve on the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission.

Welcome to the beginning of another week in the Roaring Fork Valley!

 

 

Aspen Words’ Summer Words program kicked off yesterday, with a Reader’s Retreat with Viking Penguins Executive Director Carole DeSanti and panel discussions starting today and running through Friday. For more details, visit aspenwords.org.

Ed Kosmicki

New graduates from Colorado Mountain College (CMC) received their diplomas this weekend. Commencement ceremonies were held on both Friday and Saturday.

Scot Gerdes

The Sopris Theatre Company’s production of “One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest” kicks off a two-week run today at Colorado Mountain College.

Dr. Carrie Hauser, President of Colorado Mountain College and Margaret Clement, Assistant Dean of instruction based on the Aspen campus, speaking about the 50th anniversary celebration planned for the Aspen Campus April 7.

 

If voters in Garfield County, Aspen and Carbondale want out of Senate Bill 152, now is their chance; it’s on the ballot.

 

Welcome to Valley Roundup during this summer’s pledge drive. I’m Carolyn Sackariason. Thank you for listening and your support. It’s listeners like you who we rely on to produce shows like Valley Roundup so please take a moment and make your financial contribution. No pledge is too small or large! We are here to take your donation. Please call 920-9000 or pledge right here online. And now, let’s get on with the show.

Elise Thatcher

  Taking a GED or ESL class at Colorado Mountain College costs about $40 right now. Starting this summer, school officials were planning on charging twice as much, but now that price increase is on hold until the fall.

Nova Southeastern University

  Colorado Mountain College is looking at offering a new graduate program. But it would be through a school known for student loan debt.

Enrollment up at Colorado Mountain College

Sep 21, 2015
Colorado Mountain College

The number of students taking courses at Colorado Mountain College is up. The biggest jump in enrollment is in Rifle.

The Rifle campus saw double-digit growth compared to last year’s enrollment. Campus officials point to more courses, a new downtown location and an increased number of high school students taking courses.

Campus-wide, enrollment grew by 3.4 percent. In the Roaring Fork Valley, campuses in Aspen, Carbondale and Glenwood Springs also saw growth. Lin Stickler oversees enrollment for CMC.

Colorado Mountain College/Facebook

Today’s Colorado Mountain College Board of Trustees meeting includes a session reviewing a draft of a Diversity Equity and Inclusion Plan aimed at the changing demographic of the schools students and surrounding communities.

Twitter/Carrie Morgridge

  Former residents Carrie and John Morgridge have their names on a lot of buildings, including the Colorado Mountain College campus in Aspen and the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. The former Aspen residents live on the Front Range now and are prolific philanthropists. Mrs. Morgridge recently penned the book “Every Gift Matters: How Your Passion Can Change the World.”

Nathan Lopez Photography

Colorado Mountain College has chosen a Dean for its Roaring Fork Campus. Heather Exby will lead the three locations for the broader Valley-wide campus: Carbondale, Spring Valley, and Glenwood Springs.

Mountain Edition - April 9th, 2015

Apr 9, 2015

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

A federal mid valley investigation turns out to be a gang crackdown.

Glenwood Springs residents elect two new city council members.

Questions are raised about an Aspen City Council candidate running in the spring election.

He and other candidates tackle issues at the chamber of commerce forum.

Forest Service offices reopen in Glenwood Springs.

We hear what comes next for Explore Booksellers in Aspen...as well as for local alpine skier Wiley Maple.

Today on CrossCurrents - Dr. Carrie Hauser, president of CMC with Dr. Ted Mitchell, Undersecretary of Education on the proposal for free community college.

Also, Gail Mizner, Shelly Safir-Marolt and Tammy Barr from the play "Calendar Girls".

http://coloradomtn.edu/about-cmc/president/dr-carrie-besnette-hauser/

Your Morning News - January 29th, 2015

Jan 29, 2015

Petition to Control Aspen Development Gaining Signers

A group of Aspen residents gathered at a private home last night to sign a petition about controlling development in town. If it gets enough signatures approved, the proposal would go on the May ballot. It would require voter approval on any new development that doesn’t follow the land use code. Participant Doug Wilson explained why he believes it’s a good idea to keep exceptions to a minimum.

“In the late 1960’s and early 1970’s we worked really hard to come up with the building code that we have today, and it’s made the town retain so much of it’s delicious nature and I’d like to maintain that in the future.”

Wilson is one of a small army of people gathering signatures around town to support the ballot measure. As of last night, they had about five hundred. Bert Myrin worked with about 10 people to put together the proposal. While hosting last night’s event, he said preventing exceptions would level the playing field for developers and residents.

“It’ll create a less divisive community, because everyone will know what the expectations are for the size of the box and the impact it’s going to have on the neighborhood.”

If it’s up to voters to focus on exceptions, Myrin believes that allow City Council to focus on other important issues.

Organizers hope to submit a thousand signatures next Tuesday. Election officials require about three hundred to put a measure on the ballot.

In response to the proposal, Aspen’s City Council is looking at whether to change the land use code before the election. Mayor Steve Skadron said in a heated discussion Monday that he opposes having voters decide what development is appropriate in town.

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