Colorado Mountain College

Nova Southeastern University

  Colorado Mountain College is looking at offering a new graduate program. But it would be through a school known for student loan debt.

Colorado Mountain College

The number of students taking courses at Colorado Mountain College is up. The biggest jump in enrollment is in Rifle.

The Rifle campus saw double-digit growth compared to last year’s enrollment. Campus officials point to more courses, a new downtown location and an increased number of high school students taking courses.

Campus-wide, enrollment grew by 3.4 percent. In the Roaring Fork Valley, campuses in Aspen, Carbondale and Glenwood Springs also saw growth. Lin Stickler oversees enrollment for CMC.

Colorado Mountain College/Facebook

Today’s Colorado Mountain College Board of Trustees meeting includes a session reviewing a draft of a Diversity Equity and Inclusion Plan aimed at the changing demographic of the schools students and surrounding communities.

Twitter/Carrie Morgridge

  Former residents Carrie and John Morgridge have their names on a lot of buildings, including the Colorado Mountain College campus in Aspen and the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. The former Aspen residents live on the Front Range now and are prolific philanthropists. Mrs. Morgridge recently penned the book “Every Gift Matters: How Your Passion Can Change the World.”

Nathan Lopez Photography

Colorado Mountain College has chosen a Dean for its Roaring Fork Campus. Heather Exby will lead the three locations for the broader Valley-wide campus: Carbondale, Spring Valley, and Glenwood Springs.

Mountain Edition - April 9th, 2015

Apr 9, 2015

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

A federal mid valley investigation turns out to be a gang crackdown.

Glenwood Springs residents elect two new city council members.

Questions are raised about an Aspen City Council candidate running in the spring election.

He and other candidates tackle issues at the chamber of commerce forum.

Forest Service offices reopen in Glenwood Springs.

We hear what comes next for Explore Booksellers in well as for local alpine skier Wiley Maple.

Today on CrossCurrents - Dr. Carrie Hauser, president of CMC with Dr. Ted Mitchell, Undersecretary of Education on the proposal for free community college.

Also, Gail Mizner, Shelly Safir-Marolt and Tammy Barr from the play "Calendar Girls".

Your Morning News - January 29th, 2015

Jan 29, 2015

Petition to Control Aspen Development Gaining Signers

A group of Aspen residents gathered at a private home last night to sign a petition about controlling development in town. If it gets enough signatures approved, the proposal would go on the May ballot. It would require voter approval on any new development that doesn’t follow the land use code. Participant Doug Wilson explained why he believes it’s a good idea to keep exceptions to a minimum.

“In the late 1960’s and early 1970’s we worked really hard to come up with the building code that we have today, and it’s made the town retain so much of it’s delicious nature and I’d like to maintain that in the future.”

Wilson is one of a small army of people gathering signatures around town to support the ballot measure. As of last night, they had about five hundred. Bert Myrin worked with about 10 people to put together the proposal. While hosting last night’s event, he said preventing exceptions would level the playing field for developers and residents.

“It’ll create a less divisive community, because everyone will know what the expectations are for the size of the box and the impact it’s going to have on the neighborhood.”

If it’s up to voters to focus on exceptions, Myrin believes that allow City Council to focus on other important issues.

Organizers hope to submit a thousand signatures next Tuesday. Election officials require about three hundred to put a measure on the ballot.

In response to the proposal, Aspen’s City Council is looking at whether to change the land use code before the election. Mayor Steve Skadron said in a heated discussion Monday that he opposes having voters decide what development is appropriate in town.

Your Evening News - January 28th, 2015

Jan 28, 2015

CMC Holds Local Associates Level Tuition to Zero Increase

Tuition for locals will be the same at Colorado Mountain College this academic year. The board of trustees approved a zero increase on associate-degree-level courses for those who live in the district. Those who are in-state but out of district will be an extra $6.50 per credit hour at the associates-degree level while residents of Chaffee, Grand and Jackson Counties will pay $6 extra per credit hour. The biggest increase comes for those paying out-of-state tuition, who will see a $56 per credit hour increase. A news release from CMC says the school remains one of the most affordable in the state. At the same time, the board of trustees are expected to work over the next few months on comprehensive and strategic plans to improve student access and achievement through changes to the school’s financial aid programs.

Flickr/Colorado Mountain College

Colorado Mountain College’s Board of Trustees met on Thursday to get legal advice on how to proceed on a pending court case. The trustee’s meeting was closed to the public.